Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3392738 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 16, 1968
Filing dateJul 26, 1967
Priority dateJul 26, 1967
Publication numberUS 3392738 A, US 3392738A, US-A-3392738, US3392738 A, US3392738A
InventorsPansini Andrew L
Original AssigneeAndrew L. Pansini
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic cleaner for swimming pools
US 3392738 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 16, 1968 A. PANSINl 3,392,738

AUTOMATIC CLEANER FOR SWIMMING POOLS Filed July 26, 1967 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. ANDREW L. PANSINI ATTORNEY July 16, 1968 A. 1.. PANSINI AUTOMATIC CLEANER FOR SWIMMING POOLS Filed July 26, 1967 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 R m w m ANDREW L. PANSINI ATTORNEY y 6, 1968 A. L. PANSINI AUTOMATIC CLEANER FOR SWIMMING POOLS Filed July 26, 1967 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG -11 FIG. 14

M mfi NM WP N IL W E R D N A I ay/44 v! M ATTORNEY PIC-2-15 July 16, 1968 A. L. PANSINI 3,392,733

AUTOMATIC CLEANER FOR SWIMMING POOLS Filed July 26, 1967 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR.

ANDREW L. PANSINI BY War/PW ATTORNEYS United States Patent Ofice 3,392,738 Patented July 16, 1968 3,392,738 AUTOMATIC CLEANER FOR SWIMMING POOLS Andrew L. Pansini, 180 Los Cerros Drive, San Rafael, Calif. 94904 Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 358,486, Apr. 9, 1964. This application July 26, 1967, Ser. No. 660,555

23 Claims. (Cl. 134-167) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A swimming pool cleaner having a substantial length of hose provided with a terminal cleaning nozzle, said hose being adapted to be normally submerged for free movement along the bottom of a swimming pool and being provided intermediate the length thereof with jet nozzle transport means adapted to move said hose first in one direction and then in another direction and there by prevent the stalling of said hose against submerged pool surfaces while removing dirt from the bottom of the pool through moving contact therewith.

This application is a continuation-in-part of my co-pending application, Ser. No. 575,921, filed Aug. 22, 1966, now abandoned, said latter application having been in turn a continuation-in-part of my co-pending application, Ser. No. 358,486, filed Apr. 9, 1964, now abandoned.

This invention relates to an automatic cleaner for swimming pools and the like and more particularly to a device adapted to remove the accumulated scum and dirt from the sidewalls and bottom of a pool by the jet of water issuing from a discharge nozzle attached to a flexible hose. The objects to be attained by the present invention are somewhat similar to those achieved through the use of the invention of my prior Patents 2,975,791 of Mar. 21, 1961, and 3,032,044 of May 1, 1962.

The above-cited patents disclose pool cleaning devices which include a supply conduit extending inwardly of the pool and supported at its inner end on a float. Connected with the supply conduit is a flexible cleaning hose, provided with a discharge nozzle at its free end, which is adapted to travel in a random manner over the bottom and sidewalls of the pool, movement of the same being caused by the reaction of the discharge jet on the discharge nozzle.

The main object of the present invention is to generally improve the operation of swimming pool devices of the type herein contemplated and specifically the devices shown in the above-cited patents. More particularly, as will be understood later on, the pool cleaner of the present invention is adapted to achieve substantially the same end result obtained by the devices of the cited patents while having eliminated therefrom several of the complexities of the prior devices. It will be seen that the present invention is substantially less expensive to manufacture than those disclosed in the prior art and does not sacrifice efficiency of operation.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a swimming poolcleaning device which lends itself particularly to the cleaning of pools having irregular shapes and contours and which device in fact takes advantage of such irregularities to promote elficiency.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following specification and from the drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of a typical swimming pool showing one form of the device of the invention in operation therein;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of a portion of the swimming pool of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view in side elevation of one form of cleaning hose transportng means;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 showing a simplified form of cleaning hose transporting means;

FIG. 5 is a view in side elevation, partly broken away, of an auxiliary device which may be employed along with a cleaning hose transporting means;

FIG. 6 is a view in transverse section taken in a plane indicated by lines 6-6 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a view in vertical section through the deck of a swimming pool showing a winding reel which may be employed as part of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a top plan view of the structure and apparatus of FIG. 7 with portions broken away and in section to show internal structure;

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 8 showing a modified form of the invention;

FIG. 10 is a top plan view of a modified form of driving nozzle;

FIG. 11 is a top plan view of a portion of a swimming pool showing another form of the device of the invention in operation therein;

FIG. 12 is an enlarged view taken along lines 12-12 of FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a view in perspective of the cleaning hose transporting means of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a top plan view of a portion of a swimming pool showing still another form of the device of the invention in operation therein;

FIG. 15 is an enlarged view, partly broken away, taken along lines 15-15 of FIG. 14;

FIG. 16 is a view in side elevation of still another form of the cleaning hose transporting means of the invention, the housing therefor being broken away to show the internal mechanism;

FIG. 17 is a top plan view of the hose transporting means of FIG. 16, the same including drive jet interruption means not embodied in the FIG. 16 embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 18 is a view corresponding to that of FIG. 16 but showing still another form of the cleaning hose transporting means of the invention; and

FIG. 19 is a detail view showing further control means for a cleaning hose transporting means; which may be of the type shown in FIG. 18.

In detail, and first with reference to FIG. 1, the invention will be described in connection with a typical pool installation that includes a bottom 1, an end wall 2 at the deep end of the pool and steps 3 at the shallow end of the pool. Sidewalls 4 extend along the long dimension of the pool.

A supply hose 7 is provided and is connected to a source of water under pressure which is indicated schematically at 8 in FIG. 2. Between the source 8 and the supply hose 7 there is interposed a solenoid-actuated valve indicated schematically at 9. This valve 9 is controlled by a conventional timing device 10 which serves to close the valve 9 periodically for a short duration of time and for a reason which will be described in detail later on.

The supply hose 7 is connected to a transporter generally designated 12 (FIG. 3). The transporter 12 comprises a rigid length of conduit 13 provided at one end with, for example, a female hose fitting 14 for securement to supply hose 7, and at its other end with a male fitting 15 to which a cleaning hose 16 is connected. As seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, cleaning hose 16 is flexible and is provided at its free end with a discharge nozzle 17.

Intermediate the ends of conduit 13 of transporter 12 is a tubular section 19 perpendicular to and connected with conduit 13 at one end and secured at its other end to a jet supply conduit 20.

Reactive propulsion transport jets 21, and 22, respec tively, are formed at opposite ends of the jet supply conduit 20, and a ball 23 is freely disposed in conduit for movement therealong into engagement with one or the other of valve seats and 26 formed inwardly of jets 21 and 22, respectively.

At this point it will be seen that water from source 3 may flow in supply tube 7 through conduit 13 (FIG. 3) of transporter 12 and then through cleaning hose 16 to be discharged through discharge nozzle 17. At the same time, water under pressure flows through section 19 into jet supply conduit 20 and then is discharged through whichever one of the jets 21, 22 is not obstructed by ball 23. It will be apparent that movement of discharge nozzle 17 is effected because of the flexibility of the cleaning hose 16 and at the same time additional movement of the cleaning hose 16 results from the movement of transporter 12, the latter movement being caused by the reactive propulsion imparted by whatever transport jet is in operation. From FIG. 3 it will be seen that when transport jet 21 is in operation, the movement of transporter 12 will be such as to tend to put the supply hose 7 in tension whereas when transport jet 22 is in operation, the movement will tend to put the supply hose 7 in compression.

In order to encourage translation of transporter 12 as opposed to rotation which would cause coiling of supply hose 7, the section of supply hose 7 adjacent transporter 12 is preferably made stiffer than the remainder of supply hose 7. This additional stiffness may be accomplished by providing a length of plastic tubing 28 around the hose 7 adjacent the transporter 12.

The present invention takes advantage of the fact that the typical swimming pool is usually of such a contour as to provide curved surfaces or inclined surfaces along all of which the transporter 12 is bound to move after a period of time. Assuming, for example, that the transporter 12 is in the position of FIG. 1 and moving upwardly along the inclined bottom 1 under the influence of transport jet 21 when the timer 1t) shuts off the valve 9, it will be apparent that the ball 23 will move by gravity along jet supply conduit 20 into engagement with the valve seat 25 of jet 21. By setting the timer 11) so that it shuts the valve 9 off for only a few seconds, subsequent opening of the valve 9 will result in reversal of direction of movement of the transporter 12 and consequent movement of the transporter 12 toward the end wall 2 of the pool. Obviously, a reversing action will occur if transporter 12 is tending to climb wall 2 at the time the valve 9 is actuated. It will also be apparent that a similar reversing effect will result when the transporter 12 is moving crosswise of the pool and tending to climb sidewall 4.

The random movement of the transporter and the discharge nozzle 17 which results from the operation of the above-described device insures complete cleaning of the bottom and walls of the pool. In this connection, it will be noted that transporter 12 and supply hose 7 need not necessarily be sufficiently heavy to rest on the bottom of the pool but may be buoyant enough to assume an intermediate position between the bottom and the surface. In other words, the transporter may plane, and the discharge nozzle 17 is free to take any one of an infinite number of positions, including positions along the sidewalls and end walls of the pool, during which time it cleans the pool wall surface as well as the pool floor surfaces. In fact, the transporter may plane to a degree where the transport jet discharges into air rather than into the pool water. In either case, the transport jet operates pursuant to the same principle of reaction, and in the same manner and with the same results.

The present invention contemplates the provision of a buoyant supply hose 7 which does not necessarity tend to rest on the bottom of the pool but which may take an intermediate position permitting complete coverage of the pool surfaces by the discharge nozzle 17.

The present invention also contemplates that the transporter 12 may carry the discharge nozzle 17. This, of course, would be substantially the case if the length of cleaning hose 16 is reduced so as to be almost nil.

It will be apparent that cleaning action is achieved not only by the discharge nozzle 17 but, to a considerable degree, cleaning is also achieved by the transport jets 21, 22. If desired, said jets may be inclined slightly toward the conduit 13 thereby enhancing the cleaning action without detracting much from the propulsive force of the same.

Since the towing action of the cleaning hose by the transporter as opposed to the pushing action gives extremely good coverage without the transporter becoming stuck in one position, it is possible in some instances to eliminate the jet reversing mechanism and the solenoid operated valve by providing a simple jet as shown in FIG. 4. In this case, a conduit 30 connects the supply hose 7 and the cleaning hose 16 and said conduit is provided with an offset reactive propulsion nozzle 31 which has the eflfect of towing the cleaning hose and pushing the supply hose at all times.

The advantages achieved by the above-described embodiments of the present invention are partially attributable to the fact that the transport jets are directed substantially axially of the associated water conduits. Since the supply hose 7 is flexible, pushing action on this hose results in the discharge jet taking an irregular path even if the cleaning hose 16 were not present. In like manner, the tendency of the transporter to compress the cleaning hose axially when the jet direction is reversed also insures a completely irregular random path which is of importance to optimum operation of the device. In this connection it is to be noted that pushing action on the cleaning hose is better for cleaning the sidewalls of the pool, while pulling, or towing, action on the cleaning hose is better for general pool cleaning.

It will be apparent that the above-described: device not only provides an extremely simple apparatus for accomplishing the desired result but that the transport jets, in addition to serving their main purpose of moving the discharge nozzle 17, also act as discharge nozzles in helping to clean the walls and bottom of the pool. The amount of stiffness desired in the supply hose for any size pool may be regulated by providing one or more sections of tubing 28 over the supply hose 7 in order to achieve the desired rigidity adjacent the transporter 12.

An auxiliary to the transport means is shown in FIG. 5. In this case a fitting generally designated is provided with a jet orifice 41 and is externally threaded to be attached to the female hose fitting 14 of the supply hose 7. The orifice 41 is coaxial with the adjacent portion of supply hose 7 and is directed toward the cleaning hose 16 which is connected to a fitting generally designated 43. This fitting 43 is similar to fitting 40 except that it is provided with a relatively large diameter passageway 44 communicating with cleaning hose 16. The fittings 40 and 43 are spaced apart several inches, e.g., three to four inches and are secured together in spaced relationship by means of a small diameter rod 45 which may be welded or brazed or otherwise secured at its ends to said fittings. Rod 45 is eccentric relative to the central axis of the conduit (FIG. 6). The purpose of this structure is to cause a reduction in the water pressure of the water issuing from the discharge end of the cleaning hose, thereby preventing any tendency of the end of the cleaning hose to emerge from the surface of the pool and spit water over the pool deck and. adjacent areas. All of the water issuing from orifice 4-1, along with additional water aspirated into this jet stream, issues, but at low velocity, from the discharge end of the cleaning hose. If desired, a tubular wire mesh screen 46 may extend between the fittings 40, 43 and be secured at its opposite ends to said fittings by brazing or welding. Such a screen prevents leaves, paper and other debris from clogging the conduit 44 of the cleaning hose and at the same time does not interfere with the function of the jet issuing from orifice 41.

The present invention also contemplates the provision of storage means for the conduit that includes the supply hose and the cleaning hose. Such a storage installation is shown in FIGS. 7 and 8 wherein an upwardly opening cylindrical compartment 50 is provided in deck 51 adjacent one of the sidewalls 4 of the pool. Rotatably supported within compartment 50 is a winding reel generally designated 52 which is mounted for rotation about a vertical axis on a bearing 53. Reel 52 includes a drum portion 54 and a circular base portion 55 which is adapted to support the windings of the conduit. Supply water is conducted through pipe 58 into the compartment 50 and pipe 58 extends upwardly within reel 52 and terminates in a swivel 59. Water under pressure is supplied from swivel 59 through radially extending pipe 60 to a point adjacent the inner periphery of compartment 50. Pipe 60 is provided with a T 61 to which is connected the flexible supply hose 7. A horizontally extending passageway 62 connects the lower end of compartment 50 with the pool and is adapted to receive therethrough the supply hose 7.

As best seen in FIG. 8, the pipe 60 is provided at its outer end with a horizontally extending conduit 65 having nozzles 66, 67, at its outer ends. Intermediate said nozzles the conduit 65 is provided with a two-position valve 68 having an upwardly extending actuating arm 69. At this point it will be noted that one or the other of the two nozzles may be connected to the source of water under pressure by actuation of arm 69. If the valve 68 is actuated to connect nozzle 66 with the water under pres sure, the reel 52 will rotate in a counterclockwise direction (FIG. 8) to reel in the supply hose 7 by forming windings of said hose about the drum portion 54. By reversing valve 68, the reel 52 is rotated in a clockwise direction to reel out the hose.

Since hoses, especially those formed of plastic, have different degrees of rigidity depending on the temperature, it is preferable that the hose 7 be provided with a wire 70 running axially of the same as indicated in FIG. 8. In this manner, the hose may be made somewhat more rigid than it would be in warm weather in order that the windings are not tightly formed about the reel 52 but tend to resist the winding action so that when the hose is reeled out there is no tendency for the same to double up within compartment 50. This hose structure also has the advantage of providing more favorable random movement of the supply hose within the pool during normal operation.

The compartment 50 may be covered by a lightweight cover plate 72 positioned flush with the upper level of deck 51 and provided with a small central aperture 73 to facilitate removal and replacement of said cover plate.

In lieu of the two-way valve 68, the outer end of pipe 60 may be provided with a swivel 77 (FIG. to which is secured a nozzle 78 turned at right angles to pipe 60. The nozzle 78 may be manually swung to one or the other of its two horizontally directed positions in order to reverse the direction of rotation of the reel 52.

It will be noted that the water level within compartment 50 is the same as within the pool so that the driving jets may be submerged. However, in the structure of FIGS. 7 and 8, the arm 69 may extend above the level of the water so as to make the arm readily accessible when the cover plate 72 is removed.

A modified form of storage structure is shown in FIG. 9 wherein a compartment 80 is provided which does not communicate with the pool as in the structure disclosed in FIGS. 7 and 8. In this case the manually actuated reel generally designated 81 is provided and this reel includes an upwardly extending winding handle 82 which is accessible after cover plate 83 is removed. A hole 84 is provided in cover plate 83 so as to receive therethrough the hose 7 which may then extend over the deck 51 and into the pool as indicated.

The storage arrangements shown in FIGS. 7 and 9 lend themselves particularly to use with a transporter of the type shown in FIG. 5. However, the passageway 62 may be made large enough in cross-sectional extent to accommodate the transporters shown in FIGS. 3 and 4.

The invention also contemplates the use of a jet driven reel in the combination of FIG. 9. Such an installation is readily made in existing pools.

In FIGS. 11l3, there is shown a modification of the invention which enables periodic automatic reversal of the direction of jet drive without requiring an electric timer or a solenoid actuated valve, i.e. without requiring periodic cessation of water flow.

Interconnecting supply hose 107 and cleaning hose 116, the latter having discharge nozzle 117, is a cylindrical housing 113 containing spiders 115 and 118, stationary shafts and 122 carried by the spiders, a plurality of gear sets 124, constituting a speed reducing gear train, rotatably supported on bearings 126 carried by shafts 120 and 122. The input gear 128 of the train is fixed to rotatably supported stub shaft 130 to which there is secured a vaned rotor 132 adapted to be rotated by the input water to the housing. The output gear 134 of the train is in mesh with a gear ring 136 fixedly attached to a sleeve 138 having oppositely directed 180 slots 140 and 142. Sleeve 138 is mounted on conduit 144 for rotation thereon. Conduit 144 extends through housing 113, being fixedly supported by spiders 115 and 118, having at its ends discharge nozzles 146 and 148, and being internally divided by a plug 150, or the like, into two flow passageways, the input and output ends of one of which are constituted, respectively, by port 152 formed in conduit 144 and discharge nozzle 148, the input and output ends of the other of which are constituted, respectively, by port 154 formed in conduit 144 and discharge nozzle 146.

It will be appreciated that water flowing into housing causes rotation of sleeve 138 in a constant direction under relatively high torque and low speed to disclose first one and then the other of ports 152 and 154 through their associated valving slots 142 and 140, thereby regularly and sequentially changing the direction of jet drive through first one and then the other of the drive nozzles 146 and 148. The input water to housing 113 is divided for output between cleaning hose 116 and conduit 144.

In FIGS. 14-15 there is shown a satisfactorily workable variant of that embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. l3, corresponding parts being indicated by the same reference numerals plus 200. Except for the differences hereinafter described, these two embodiments of the invention are essentially the same as to consturction and mode of operation. Tubular section 21.9 is comprised of interfitting bosses, one of which is integral with conduit 213 and the other of which is integral with the jet supply conduit 220. A releasable clamp connection therebetween is afiorded by set screw 218, thereby enabling the jet supply conduit to be disposed at any angleto conduit 213 between axial alignment therewith, as in the embodiment of FIGS. 1-3, and 90 thereto, as shown in FIGS. 14-15, these two extreme positions being the two most practical and desirable positions for use.

The jet supply conduit 228 is substantially longer than jet supply conduit 20 of FIGS. l3 so that when conduit 220 is disposed at substantially a right angle to conduit 213 the inactive jet end of the former tends to engage the pool floor and thereby furnish outrigger support to prevent twisting of the hose sections about their long axes.

As is indicated in FIG. 14, when the jet supply conduit 220 is disposed cross-wise to conduit 213, the hose sections 207, 216 tend to assume the shape of a bow, the operative transport jet being disposed at the concave side thereof. Thus, in the solid line showing of FIG. 14, jet 222 is operating, while in the dotted! line showing of FIG. 14, jet 221 is operating. The resultant hose shape pattern responsive to jet transport action is quite similar 7 to that of the embodiment of FIGS. 1-3. Thus, in FIG. 2, the two hose sections 7 and 16 are moved, the former being pushed and the latter being dragged, from the solid line position to the dotted line position during the course of operation of transport jet 22.

FIGS. 16-19 illustrate further embodiments of the subject inventive concept, i.e. the provision of means for sequentially applying a driving force in more than one direction to a submerged pool-cleaning hose to ensure that the hose will extricate itself from any position in the pool where continued application of a uni-directional force would tend to immobilize the hose.

In FIG. 16, the water supply hose 307 and the cleaning hose 316 are attached to housing 313. The housing 313 is shown as being circular in plan view outline (FIG. 17) and, in side view outline, as being convexly formed at the top and bottom. Within the housing, shafts 360, 362 and 364 are supported for rotation by bearings 366. Attached to shaft 360 for rotation therewith is a vane impeller 368. Hose 307 is provided with a discharge end 370 adapted to direct water tangentially of the impeller and in driving relation thereto. Affixed to shaft 360 is an input gear 372 which is in mesh with gear ring 374, the latter being affixed to shaft 362. Also affixed to shaft 362 is a gear 376 which is in mesh with gear ring 378, the latter being aflixed to shaft 364. Shaft 364 is hollow and is formed with one or more ports 380 so that water may flow into and through shaft 364. The upper and lower ends of shaft 364 extend through the housing and are formed to provide a pair of jet nozzle segments 382.

The two drive jets provided by segments 382 impart a balanced driving force to the transporter housing with reference to its horizontal axis, thus driving the streamlined and symmetrically shaped housing generally horizontally through the water in submerged condition. The rotational movement of shaft 364 causes a continuous but slow movement of the nozzle segments 382 through 360, thereby effecting a continuous change in the direction of the effective jet driving force applied to the transporter housing and ensuring that the housing will be self-extricating from any dead-ended position it may reach within the pool.

FIG. 17 illustrates the transporter housing 313 modfied to the extent of being provided with one or more arcuate baffies 384 on each of its upper and lower surfaces. Each such baffle may comprise a mounting flange 386 for attachment to the housing and a flange 388 extending vertically and away from the housing into blocking relation with a segment of the full circle path of discharge of a nozzle segment 382. Such upper and lower bafiies, which may be attached to the housing for selective positional adjustment, as shown, function to simultaneously and periodically block and close off the jet openings of segments 832 and thereby temporarily stop the transporter in various positions within the pool. Pairs of baffles 384 can be employed to limit jet drive flow to selected directions, e.g. essentially parallel to the hose connection axis of housing 313 or essentially at a right angle to said axis.

While the size and shape of housing 313 are relatively unimportant, it is preferable that its vertical dimension be relatively compact and that its horizontal dimension in the direction at a right angle to its hose connection axis be fairly substantial in order to minimize the possibility of the housing flipping to an upside down position to thereby twist the hose.

FIG. 18 shows another form of transporter for the supply and cleaning hoses. Again, the housing 413 is preferably circular in plan view outline, and it has connected to it a water supply hose 407 and a cleaning hose 416. Rotatably mounted within housing 416 in bearings 466 are shafts 460, 462 and 464. Shaft 460 is provided with fixed gears 472 and 473; shaft 462 is provided with fixed gears 474 and 476; and shaft 464 is provided with fixed gear 478. This train of gears is driven by the worm gear end 490 of rotatably mounted shaft 492 to which impeller 494 is fixedly attached, the latter being driven in "rotation by input water from the supply hose 407. Shaft 464 is provided with a port 480 whereby water may pass through tubular arm 481, fixedly attached to shaft 464, and be discharged from jet nozzle segment 482 which is integral with arm 481 and and is parallel to and in vertical alignment with said arm 481. The reversed direction of nozzle segment 482, i.e. being directed toward the vertical axis of rotation of its carrier shaft 464 rather than, as in FIGS. 16-17, away from the vertical axis of rotation of the nozzle segment carrier shaft 364, causes the jet discharged from nozzle segment 482 to at all times tow, or pull, and not push, the housing, thereby enhancing the horizontal stability of the housing.

In FIG. 19, the embodiment of FIG. 18 is modified to the extent of incorporating means to selectively control the time of and direction of discharge of the transporter drive jet. Thus, there is disposed around shaft 464 in nonbinding relation thereto a sleeve 496 having a pair of opposed slots 498, each of which extend around the sleeve for somewhat less than Slots 498 are disposed at the level of port 480, so that when said port is in registry with either of said slots a driving jet issues from nozzle segment 482, and when said port is blocked by either of the two opposed imperforate portions 499 of the sleeve between the slots no driving jet issues from nozzle segment 482. Sleeve 496 is fixedly secured to plate 500, and the latter is provided with an elongated arcuate slot, not shown, through which a screw 502 passes for connection to the wall of housing 413. By loosening screw 502, pivotally adjusting plate 500, and re-tightening screw 502, the two opposed imperforate portions 499 may be disposed in alignment with the diametral axis of connection of the hoses 407, 416 to the housing, or at any selected angle relative to said axis, and thereby the driving jet may be turned off at selected angular positions of 090 relative to said axis.

The above specific descriptions of the preferred forms of the invention are not to be taken as restrictive since it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications in design may be resorted to without departing from the scope of the following claims. For example, it is not a departure from the present invention, as hereafter claimed, if the transport jet discharges into air. It is sutficient to be within the practice of the present invention for the locus of discharge and the direction of discharge of the transport jet to be such that the action of the jet tends to a measurable degree to either impart a compressive or a stretching force to a portion of the supply hose located in the generally adjacent vicinity of the transport jet.

Furthermore, it is to be pointed out that the various forms of apparatus herein specifically illustrated and described may serve a cleaning function to a satisfactory degree in the absence of the cleaning hose (e.g. 16 in FIG. 1) and its terminal discharge nozzle (e.g. 17 in FIG. 1), i.e. considering the downstream end of the transporter, to which the cleaning hose is normally attached, as being plugged, or closed off, and therefore lacking the cleaning hose and the latters discharge nozzle, each of the various forms of the invention, so modified, would be operable to effect pool wall and pool bottom cleaning through the combined dirt dislodging effect of the drive jet of the transporter and the physical contact with, and movement against, the pool walls and bottom of the supply hose and transporter.

Also, each form of the apparatus, whether with or without the cleaning hose and its attached terminal discharge nozzle, as above-described, can, with advantage, be provided with an additional jet discharge nozzle, e.g. of the type shown in FIG. 4. This additional nozzle would be located along the supply hose in flow communication with the supply hose at some position intermediate the transporter and the source of water under pressure, but in submerged condition, and said additional nozzle would be oriented so that the jet it discharged would put that portion of the supply hose which is upstream from the additional nozzle under a tension rather than a compression force. This would not only augment the pool cleaning effect by way of the presence of a further jet-discharging nozzle, but, more importantly, the water supply hose tensioning jet would reduce the load, i.e. the water supply hose, to be moved by the transporter.

Included within the subject inventive concept is apparatus consisting of a transporter, a supply hose connected thereto, a single fixedly positioned and continuously operable transporter drive jet oriented to impart a component of pulling motion to the supply hose and a component of lateral movement to ,the transporter so as to tend to prevent the transporter from becoming stalled against a portion of the pool structure, said apparatus either including or not including the abovementioned additional nozzle to reduce the load to be moved by the transporter.

What is claimed is:

1. A cleaning device for swimming pools and the like, comprising:

(A) an elongated conduit having an inner portion adapted to be connected at its inner end to a source of water under pressure and having an outer portion provided at its outer end with a first submergible discharge nozzle;

(B) a second discharge nozzle carried by said conduit at a point intermediate the ends thereof and directed substantially axially of the adjacent part of said inner conduit portion;

and wherein said second nozzle is coaxial with said adjacent part of said inner conduit portion and is adapted to direct at least some of the water discharged therefrom into the outer portion of said conduit for subsequent discharge through said first nozzle.

2. A cleaning device for swimming pools and the like, comprising:

(A) an elongated conduit having an inner portion adapted to be connected at its inner end to a source of water under pressure and having an outer portion provided at its outer end with a first submergible discharge nozzle;

(B) a second discharge nozzle carried by said conduit at a point intermediate the ends thereof and directed substantially axially of the adjacent part of said inner conduit portion;

and wherein said conduit is interrupted to provide a space between said second nozzle and the outer portion of said conduit, said second nozzle being directed coaxially of the adjacent part of said outer portion, whereby at least some of the water discharged from said second nozzle enters said outer portion of the conduit for subsequent discharge from said first nozzle, and means extending across said space for holding said portions of said conduit together.

3. A device according to claim 2 wherein said last mentioned means is a perforate tubular sleeve secured at its opposite ends to said portions.

4. In a cleaning device for swimming pools which includes an elongated conduit having its inner end con nected to a source of water under pressure and having its outer end provided with a discharge nozzle:

(A) a reel adapted to be rotated in one direction for receiving windings of said conduit therearound for storage of a portion of said conduit and adapted to be rotated in the opposite direction for paying out said conduit into said pool; and,

(B) a driving nozzle carried by said reel and directed tangentially relative to the axis of rotation of said reel, said driving nozzle being connected to said source of water whereby discharge of water rotates said reel.

5. A device according to claim 4 wherein said driving nozzle is swingable to one or the other of two oppositely directed positions to eflect rotation of said reel in either direction as desired.

6. A device according to claim 4 wherein a second driving nozzle is provided on said reel directed oppositely from said first mentioned driving nozzle, and means for connecting said source with one or the other of said driving nozzles for driving said reel in either direction.

7. A device according to claim 4 wherein said reel is positioned in a compartment adjacent said pool and said compartment communicates with said pool by a passageway adapted to receive said conduit therethrough.

8. A device according to claim 4 wherein said reel is positioned in an upwardly opening compartment adjacent to said pool, the compartment being provided with a cover for closing the same, said cover being provided with an opening for receiving said conduit therethrough.

9. An automatic cleaning device for swimming pools, comprising:

(A) an elongated flexible conduit having a portion adapted to be extended in submerged condition adjacent the lower surface of a swimming pool, said portion having:

(1) one end adapted to be connected to a source of water under pressure;

(2) an opposite end provided with a submergible discharge nozzle; and,

(B) reactive propulsion means carried by said portion intermediate the ends thereof for substantially unrestricted random movement together therewith, said means comprising:

(1) a body connected to said portion so as to be adapted to assume therewith a submerged condition adjacent the lower surface of a pool to be cleaned, said body defining an interior cavity adapted to be in fluid communication with a source of water under pressure; and

(2) a nozzle segment secured to said body and having a pair of substantially oppositely disposed discharge jet openings adapted to be in fluid communication with said cavity and adapted to be positioned to discharge jets of water, and means for alternately opening and closing each of said jet discharge openings, whereby, when said portion is in submerged condition adjacent the lower surface of a pool to be cleaned and said cavity is connected to a source of water under pressure, a jet of water is alternately discharged from each of said openings in a direction imparting a force to said portion through said body to effect at least a component of axial movement of a length of said portion, immediately attached to said body, adjacent said surface.

10. A device according to claim 9, wherein:

(A) a length of said portion upstream and immediately adjacent said means is secured in substantially inflexible relationship relative to said body; and,

(B) said upstream length is stiffened to a degree relative to the remainder of said portion and over a lineal distance suflicient to substantially prevent coiling of said portion responsive to the action of said propulsion means.

11. A device according to claim 9, wherein said means for alternately opening and closing each of said discharge jet openings comprises:

(1) a pair of valve members, one of said members being associated with one of said openings and the other of said members being associated with the other of said openings, each of said members being mounted to be drivably moved to alternately open and close the opening with which it is associated; and

(2) water-motor drive means operative in response to the flow of water from a source of. water under pressure to drivably move said valve members and thereby alternately open and close said openings.

12. A device according to claim 11, wherein:

(A) a length of said portion upstream and immediately adjacent said means is secured in substantially inflexible relationship relative to said body; and,

(B) said upstream length is stiffened to a degree relative to the remainder of said portion and over a lineal distance suflicient to substantially prevent coiling of said portion responsive to the action of said one of said reactive propulsion means.

13. An automatic cleaning device for swimming pools,

comprising:

(A) an elongated flexible conduit having a portion adapted to be extended in submerged condition adjacent the lower surface of a swimming pool, said portion having:

(1) one end adapted to be connected to a source of water under pressure;

(2) an opposite end provided with a submergible discharge nozzle; and,

(B) a transporter carried by said portion intermediate the ends thereof for substantially unrestricted random movement together therewith, said transporter comprising:

( 1) a body having an interior cavity adapted to be in fluid communication with a source of water under pressure;

(2) a pair of substantially oppositely disposed discharge jet openings adapted to be in fluid communication with said cavity; and,

(3) gravity operable valve means for effecting the closing of one of said discharge jet openings and the opening of the other of said discharge jet openings, said means being responsive to the interruption of fluid flow into said cavity and to a change in the angle of inclination of said body with reference to a horizontal plane as said body moves through a pool being cleaned.

14. A transporter for a submergible bexible conduit used in the cleaning of swimming pools, said conduit having one end adapted to be connected to a source of water under pressure and an opposite end provided with a discharge nozzle, said transporter comprising:

(A) a body having an interior cavity adapted to be in fluid communication with a source of water under pressure and adapted to be carried by said conduit intermediate the ends thereof in submerged condition adjacent the lower surface of a swimmin'g pool;

(B) a pair of substantially oppositely disposed discharge jet openings adapted to be in fluid communication with said cavity; and,

(C) gravity operable valve means for effecting the closing of one of said discharge jet openings and the opening of the other of said discharge jet openings, said means being responsive to the interruption of fluid flow into said cavity and to a change in the angle of inclination of said body with reference to a horizontal plane as said body moves through a pool being cleaned.

15. A transporter according to claim 14, wherein:

(A) said interior cavity is of elongated tubular configuration;

(B) said discharge jet openings are disposed at opposite ends of said cavity;

(C) fluid communication with said cavity is established through an inlet opening provided intermediate the ends thereof;

(D) said valve means comprises a closure member freely movable within said cavity to either side of said inlet opening; and,

(B) said closure member is adapted to seal the jet opening adjacent thereto against water entering said inlet opening.

16. An automatic cleaning device for swimming pools, comprising:

(A) an elongated flexible conduit having a portion adapted to be extended in submerged condition adjacent the lower surface of a swimming pool, said portion having:

(1) one end adapted to be connected to a source of water under pressure;

(2) an opposite end provided with a submergible discharge nozzle;

(B) a transporter carried by said portion intermediate the ends thereof for substantially unrestricted random movement together therewith, said transporter comprising:

( 1) a body having an interior cavity in sealed fluid communication with the interior of said portion;

(2) a pair of substantially oppositely disposed discharge jet openings in fluid communication with said cavity; and

(3) a closure member adapted to gravitate to positions alternatively closing either one of said openings, which member is free to gravitate only upon the interruption of fluid flow into said cavity; and,

(C) means to selectively interrupt fluid flow into said cavity.

17. A device according to claim 16, wherein said means to selectively interrupt fluid flow comprises a periodically operated shut-off valve disposed to interrupt the flow of water to said conduit from said source of water under pressure.

18. An automatic pool cleaning device comprising:

(A) an elongated flexible conduit having:

(1) one end adapted to be connected to a source of water under pressure;

(2) an opposite end provided with a submergible discharge nozzle;

(B) reactive propulsion means carried by said conduit intermediate the ends thereof for substantially unrestricted random movement together therewith, said means comprising:

(1) a body connected to said conduit, said body defining an interior cavity adapted to be in fluid communication with a source of water under pressure, said body being adapted to be in submerged condition along the lower surface of a swimming pool when water is not flowing through said conduit;

(2) an angularly adjustable nozzle segment pivotally secured to said body and having a pair of substantially oppositely disposed discharge jet openings in fluid communication with said cavity, each of said jet openings being thereby adapted to discharge a jet of water along a path which defines with the underlying portion of the axis of said conduit, with reference to a horizontal plane, an angle of from 0-90, said jet of water being thereby adapted to effect a dragging movement of at least one of the two portions of said conduit which are disposed immediately adjacent said nozzle segment, whereby, upon commencement of flow of water through said conduit, said dragging movement of said conduit portion is adapted to effect a sweeping or dislodgement of dirt from the portion of the lower pool surface underlying said portion of said conduit and said jet of water is adapted to effect a pool cleaning action to supplement the pool cleaning action of the water discharged from said nozzle at said opposite end of said conduit, and

(3) means for effecting the closing of one of said discharge jet openings and the opening of the other of said discharge jet openings.

3,392,733 13 14 19. An automatic cleaning device for swimming pools, of a length of said portion, immediately attached comprising: to said body, adjacent said surface.

(A) an elongated flexible conduit having a portion 22. An automatic cleaning device for swiming pools,

adapted to be extended in submerged condition adcomprising: jacent the lower surface of a swimming pool, said (A) an elongated flexible conduit having a portion portion having:

(1) one end adapted to be connected to a source of water under pressure;

(2) an opposite end provided with a submergible discharge nozzle; and

(B) reactive propulsion means carried by said portion intermediate the ends thereof for substantially unrestricted random movement together therewith, said means comprising:

(1) a body connected to said portion so as to be adapted to assume therewith a submerged condition adjacent the lower surface of a pool to be cleaned, said body defining an interior cavity adapted to be in fluid communication with a source of water under pressure; and

(2) a nozzle segment carried by said body and having :a jet opening adapted to be in fluid communication with said cavity and adapted to be positioned to discharge a jet of water in a direction generally parallel to the lower surface of a pool to be cleaned and thereby cause said body to move in submerged condition adjacent such lower pool surface, said nozzle segment being connected to said body for rotative movement whereby said jet of water may be discharged at points along an arcuate path, and drive means carried by said body and responsive to water flow within said cavity to impart rotative movement to said nozzle segment.

adapted to be extended in submerged condition adjacent and above the lower surface of a swimming pool and to be disposed for substantially unrestricted random movement within said spool, said portion being adapted to be connected to a source of water under pressure; and

(B) reactive propulsion means carried by said portion for substantially unrestricted random movement together therewith, said means comprising:

(1) a body connected to said portion so as to be adapted to assume therewith a submerged condition adjacent the lower surface of a pool to be cleaned, said body defining an interior cavity adapted to be in fluid communication with a source of water under pressure; and

(2) a nozzle segment carried by said body and having a jet opening adapted to be in fluid communicat-ion with said cavity and adapted to be positioned to discharge a jet of water in a direction generally parallel to the lower surface of a pool to be cleaned and thereby cause said body to move in submerged condition adjacent such lower pool surface, said nozzle segment being connected to said body for rotative movement whereby said jet of water may be discharged at points along an arcuate path, and drive means carried by said body and responsive to water flow within said cavity to impart rotative movement to said nozzle segment.

23. An automatic cleaning device for swimming pools, comprising:

(A) an elongated flexible conduit having a portion 20. The pool cleaning device of claim 19 including means carried by said body and positioned to selectively and periodically impede effective body-drive discharge from said jet opening during the course of rotative movement of said nozzle segment.

21. An automatic cleaning device for swimming pools,

comprising:

(A) an elongated flexible conduit having a portion adapted to be extended in submerged condition adjacent the lower surface of a swimming pool and to be disposed for substantially unrestricted random movement within said pool, said portion being adapted to be connected to a source of water under pressure; and

(B) reactive propulsion means carried by said portion for substantially unrestricted random movement together therewith, said means comprising:

(1) a body connected to said portion so as to be adapted to assume therewith a submerged condition adjacent the lower surface of a pool to be cleaned, said body being free of moving parts which are adapted to engage said lower surface, said body defining an interior cavity adapted to be in fluid communication with a source of water under pressure; and

(2) a nozzle segment secured to said body and having a pair of substantially oppositely disposed discharge jet openings adapted to be in fluid communication with said cavity and adapted to be positioned to discharge jets of water, and water flow-responsive control means for alternately opening and closing each of said jet discharge openings, whereby, when said portion is in submerged condition adjacent the lower surface of a pool to be cleaned and said cavity is connected to a source of water under pressure, :a jet of water is alternately discharged from each of said openings in a direction imparting a force to said portion through said body to efiect at least a component of axial movement adapted to be extended in submerged condition adjacent the lower surface of a swimming pool and to be disposed for substantially unrestricted random movement within said pool, said portion being adapted to be connected to a source of water under pressure;

(B) first reactive propulsion means, the same being carried by said portion for substantially unrestricted random movement together therewith, said means comprising:

(1) a body connected to said portion so as to be adapted to assume therewith a submerged condition adjacent the lower surface of a pool to be cleaned, said body being free of moving parts which are adapted to engage said lower surface, said body defining an interior cavity adapted to be in fluid communication with a source of water under pressure;

(2) a first nozzle segment, the same being secured to said body having a jet opening adapted to be in fluid communication with said cavity and adapted to be positioned to discharge a jet of water, whereby, when said portion is in submerged condition adjacent the lower surface of a pool to be cleaned and said cavity is connected to a source of water under pressure, a jet of water is discharged from said opening in a direction imparting a force to said portion through said body to effect at least a component of axial movement of a length of said portion, immediately attached to said body, adjacent said surface; and

(C) second reactive propulsion means, the same being carried by said portion for substantially unrestricted random movement together therewith, comprising a second nozzle segment, the same being secured to said portion in flow communication therewith, disposed in spaced apart relation to said first nozzle seg- 15 ment and upstream thereof, said second nozzle segment being oriented to discharge a jet of Water and thereby apply a tension force to the adjacent part of said flexible conduit which is upstream relative to said second nozzle segment. 5

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1961 Pansini 134167 Pansini 134168 XR Varian 134168 XR Anthony 134167 Winston et al. 134167 XR Ruston 151.7 XR

Miller 134168. XR

Vernon 134168 Arneson 134167 ROBERT L. BLEUTGE, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2975791 *Jul 2, 1959Mar 21, 1961Pansini Andrew LAutomatic swimming pool cleaner
US2988762 *Feb 8, 1960Jun 20, 1961Hugh H BabcockSelf-steering submarine suction cleaner
US3032044 *May 12, 1958May 1, 1962Pansini Andrew LAutomatic swimming pool cleaner
US3074078 *Jul 6, 1959Jan 22, 1963Varian Sigurd FSwimming pool cleaning method and apparatus
US3139099 *Jul 1, 1963Jun 30, 1964Anthony Pools IncSwimming pool cleaner construction
US3170180 *Jan 14, 1963Feb 23, 1965Marengo Inv S IncSwimming pool cleaning aid
US3217886 *Aug 27, 1962Nov 16, 1965Ruston Edward WAutomatic swimming pool cleaner
US3247969 *Aug 28, 1961Apr 26, 1966Miller Avy LSwimming pool
US3261371 *Jun 29, 1964Jul 19, 1966Vernon James BSwimming pool cleaning system
US3291145 *Mar 8, 1965Dec 13, 1966Arneson Howard MSwimming pool cleaning device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3512540 *May 27, 1968May 19, 1970Hughes Wayne LApparatus for cleaning swimming pools
US3530511 *Dec 9, 1968Sep 29, 1970Poolmaid IncAutomatically extensible and retractable pool cleaning apparatus
US3580511 *Dec 27, 1968May 25, 1971Hammelmann PaulSubmersible cleaning gun
US3598132 *Jun 27, 1969Aug 10, 1971Miller Eldon SAutomatic jet-action swimming pool cleaner attachment device
US3794052 *Jan 17, 1972Feb 26, 1974Goettl JPool-cleaning apparatus
US3883366 *Jul 27, 1973May 13, 1975Blumenfeld Charles MPool cleaner
US4007749 *Apr 7, 1975Feb 15, 1977Pansini Andrew LAutomatic pool cleaner system with timer device
US4023581 *Nov 10, 1975May 17, 1977Andrew L. PansiniAutomatic swimming pool cleaner
US4086933 *Sep 23, 1976May 2, 1978Pansini Andrew LAutomatic pool cleaner system with timer device
US4169484 *May 30, 1978Oct 2, 1979Josef BonigutAutomatic pool cleaner apparatus
US4241464 *Jun 29, 1979Dec 30, 1980Nevin BuckwalterFluid jet device
US4281995 *Mar 7, 1977Aug 4, 1981Pansini Andrew LAutomatic pool cleaners
US4282893 *Apr 21, 1980Aug 11, 1981Kane Robert JCleaning device for swimming pools
US4558479 *Jan 26, 1984Dec 17, 1985Alopex Industries, Inc.Pool cleaner
US4589986 *May 21, 1985May 20, 1986Alopex Industries, Inc.Pool cleaner
US4839063 *Nov 7, 1986Jun 13, 1989Spooner EstCleaning of a body of liquid
US5014912 *Dec 5, 1988May 14, 1991Oakleigh, Ltd.Device for displacing a submerged article
US5226205 *Sep 11, 1991Jul 13, 1993Fred International C.V.Hydraulic machine
US5985156 *Dec 25, 1997Nov 16, 1999Henkin; Melvyn L.Automatic swimming pool cleaning system
US6039886 *Dec 26, 1997Mar 21, 2000Henkin; Melvyn L.Water suction powered automatic swimming pool cleaning system
US6090219 *Dec 26, 1997Jul 18, 2000Henkin; Melvyn L.Positive pressure automatic swimming poor cleaning system
US6895984 *Jan 16, 2004May 24, 2005Andrew L. PansiniPool cleaner deployment arrangement
US6974103Feb 19, 2002Dec 13, 2005Pansini Andrew LHose reel automatic storage
US7145074May 5, 2005Dec 5, 2006Henkin-Laby, LlcAutomatic pool cleaner power conduit including stiff sections
US7334601 *Nov 30, 2004Feb 26, 2008Torkelson John EPool cleaning systems
US7441284Jun 27, 2005Oct 28, 2008Pansini Andrew LHose reel automatic storage
US7501056Nov 18, 2005Mar 10, 2009Henkin-Laby, LlcPositive pressure pool cleaner propulsion subsystem
US7543607Dec 27, 2005Jun 9, 2009Henkin-Laby, LlcAutomatic pool cleaner power conduit including stiff sections and resilient axially flexible couplers
US7786381Nov 18, 2006Aug 31, 2010Henkin-Laby, LlcAutomatic pool cleaner power conduit including stiff sections
US7849877Dec 14, 2010Zodiac Pool Systems, Inc.Diverter valve
US8910662Dec 13, 2010Dec 16, 2014Zodiac Pool Systems, Inc.Diverter valve
US20050199409 *May 5, 2005Sep 15, 2005Henkin Melvyn L.Automatic pool cleaner power conduit including stiff sections
US20050236508 *Jun 27, 2005Oct 27, 2005Pansini Andrew LHose reel automatic storage
US20060065580 *Nov 18, 2005Mar 30, 2006Henkin Melvyn LPositive pressure pool cleaner propulsion subsystem
US20060169322 *Jan 3, 2006Aug 3, 2006Torkelson John EConcealed automatic pool vacuum systems
US20070062733 *Nov 18, 2006Mar 22, 2007Henkin Melvyn LAutomatic pool cleaner power conduit including stiff sections
US20070144602 *Dec 27, 2005Jun 28, 2007Henkin Melvyn LAutomatic pool cleaner power conduit including stiff sections and resilient axially flexible couplers
EP0319342A2 *Dec 5, 1988Jun 7, 1989OAKLEIGH LIMITED (a Gibraltar company)A device for displacing a submerged article
EP1579095A2 *Oct 15, 2003Sep 28, 2005Melvyn L. HenkinAutomatic pool cleaner power conduit including stiff sections
EP1695770A1 *May 6, 1997Aug 30, 2006Melvyn L. HenkinPositive pressure automatic swimming pool cleaning system
WO1997049504A1 *May 6, 1997Dec 31, 1997Henkin Melvyn LanePositive pressure automatic swimming pool cleaning system
WO1999033582A1 *Dec 23, 1998Jul 8, 1999Henkin Melvyn LanePositive pressure automatic swimming pool cleaning system
WO2007001857A2 *Jun 14, 2006Jan 4, 2007Pansini Andrew LHose reel automatic storage
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/167.00R, 4/490, 15/1.7
International ClassificationE04H4/00, E04H4/16
Cooperative ClassificationE04H4/1681
European ClassificationE04H4/16D
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 18, 1981AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: JANDY INDUSTRIES, INC., 27 LARKSPUR STREET, SAN RA
Effective date: 19810727
Owner name: PANSINI, ANDREW L.
Nov 18, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: JANDY INDUSTRIES, INC., 27 LARKSPUR STREET, SAN RA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:PANSINI, ANDREW L.;REEL/FRAME:003928/0681
Effective date: 19810727