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Publication numberUS3392784 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 16, 1968
Filing dateNov 29, 1966
Priority dateNov 29, 1966
Publication numberUS 3392784 A, US 3392784A, US-A-3392784, US3392784 A, US3392784A
InventorsBrown Joe R
Original AssigneeJoe R. Brown
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Well tool with releasable anchor assembly
US 3392784 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 16, 1968 J. R. BROWN 3,392,784

WELL TOOL WITH RELEASABLE ANCHOR ASSEMBLY A TTG/QNEYS July 16, 1968 1. R. BROWN 3,392,734

WELL TOOL WITH RELEASABLE ANCHOR ASSEMBLY 3 Sheets-Sheet Filed Nov. 29, 1966 July 16, 1968 J. R. BROWN 3,392,784

WELL TOOL WITH RELEASABLE ANCHOR ASSEMBLY s sheets-sheet s Filed Nov. 29, 1966 dof R: BROWN INVENTOR.

,ITTORNE/S United States Patent O1 Ecc 3,392,784 Patented July 16, 1968 3,392,784 WELL TOOL WITH RELEASABLE ANCHOR ASSEMBLY Joe R. Brown, 8490 Katy Road, Houston, Tex. 77024 Filed Nov. 29, 1966, Ser. No. 597,687 10 Claims. (Cl. 166-123) The present invention relates to an improved well tool, such as a packer, anchor, etc., which is adapted to be set in a well bore.

In many wells, it is desirable to provide a permanently set well packer, that is, one which after being set in a Well bore on a tubing string, remains -set even though the tubing string is removed. These so-called permanent packers generally are not retrievable. lIt is often necessary to drill such packers out of a well bore in order to remove them.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved Well packer or anchor which, when set in a well bore, remains set upon removal of the well string on which it was run and which may be unset and retrieved.

Another object is to provide an improved permanenttype well packer or anchor which ymay be readily retrieved from a well bore.

Still another object is to provide an improved permanent-type well packer or anchor having provision for release from set position by rotation of the wel] string to which it is connected and also by lifting of the said well string.

A further object is to provide an improved, retrievable, permanent' well packer or anchor which is economical and simple in construction and operation.

A still further object is to provide an improved permanent-type well packer which is retrievable and includes a by-pass around the packing which may be readily opened and closed.

These and other objects and advantages are hereinafter set forth in describing the preferred form of the present invention as shown in the drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a partial longitudinal sectional view of the preferred form of a well packer of the present invention shown in position being run into a well bore.

FIGURE 2 is a similar view of the same well packer in set position.

FIGURE 3 is a similar longitudinal sectional view illustrating the well packer of FIGURE 1 in released or unset position after it has been released by a straight upward pull on the tubing string.

FIGURE 4 is a transverse sectional View of the I-slot connection at the upper end of the well packer taken along lines 4 4 in FIGURE l.

FIGURE 5 is a transverse sectional View of the setting means taken along lines 5 5 in FIGURE 1 and illustrating the means preventing longitudinal setting :movement between the lower abutment and the tubular support.

FIGURE -6 is a transverse sectional view of the setting means taken along lines 6 6 in FIGURE l and illustrating the means preventing relative rotation between the setting means and the tubular support.

FIGURE 7 is a layout of the I-slots in the upper abutment of the Well packer illustrated in the other figures.

FIGUR-E 8 is a partial sectional view of the setting means enlarged to provide clarity of the details of the structure.

Referring to the drawings, the preferred form of well packer illustrated is of the permanent type of well packer, that is, it may be run into a well bore on a tubing string, set, and then remains set with the tubing string removed therefrom. However, this improved well packer differs from prior permanent well packers in that it may be readily unset and removed from the well bore. v

The illustrated well packer includes the tubular support 10 which is secured to the upper abutment 12 and includes the packing assembly P and the anchoring assembly A surrounding and supported by the tubular 10. Tubular support 10` is provided with grooves receiving snap rings 14 and 16 and defines the lower external shoulder 18, to support the packing and anchoring assemblies thereon.

To connect to a tubing string, the upper abutment 12 has its upper portion slotted to form the J-slots in the pattern best illustrated in FIGURE 7 and hereinafter discussed. A means is provided to reinforce the upper end of upper abutment 12. As shown, such reinforcing means includes the sleeve 20, which is secured around the exterior of upper abutment 12, as by welding. In running position, the collar 22 which is connected to the tubing string T and includes the pins 24 projecting therefrom, is adapted to be received in the J-slots defined in upper abutment 12 and is held in such position by the shear pins 26. The valve sleeve 28 is secured to the collar 22 and in running position, extends downwardly through the interior of the tubular support 10 as shown. The valve sleeve 28 defines the ports 30 which in running, are positioned in communication .with the I-slots defined in the upper abutment 12 to provide a by-pass communieating from the interior of the valve sleeve 28 to the exterior of the well packer above the upper end of upper abutment 12. The packing 32 surrounds the exterior of the valve 28 at a point spaced slightly above the ports 30 and is adapted when the valve sleeve 28 is lowered, as hereinafter explained, to seal against the interior of tubular support 10 whereby the bypass is closed to thereby prevent ow of uids through such by-pass. The support collar 34 is secured to the lower end of the valve 30 and adapted to fit closely within the interior of the tubular support 10 for the reasons hereinafter explained.

The packing assembly P is positioned immediately below the upper abutment 12 around the tubular support 10 and includes the packing element 36 and the upper and lower packing followers 38 and 40. The packing element 36 is of the usual type which when compressed longitudinally, is adapted to move radially outward to seal against the interior of the casing C.

The anchoring assembly A is also positioned around the tubular support 10` immediately below the packing assembly P and includes the upper expander 42, which abuts the lower packing `follower 40 and is releasably connected to the tubular support 10l -by shear pin 44 and is also supported on the tubular support 10 by snap ring 14; anchor body 46, which includes central body ring 48 supported in running position on the snap ring 16, and a plurality of fingers 50 extending upwardly and downwardly therefrom, each of the fingers terminating at its exterior portion in outwardly extending teeth to form the upper gripping elements or slips 52 which are connected to the upper expander 42 lby the shear pin 54 and the lower gripping elements or slips 56; and the lower expander 58, which in running position, is supported on the shoulder 118. The inside surface of each of the fingers 50 under the gripping elements 52 and 56 is tapered inwardly toward the center of the anchor body 46 to coact with the tapers on the upper expander 42 and the lower expander 58 so that when the distance 4between the expanders is shortened, the gripping elements 52 and 56 are wedged outwardly into pipe-gripping .position with the interior of the casing C. The lower expander 58 is connected to the lower abutment `60. The interior of the lower abutment 60 is provided with the low friction threads 62 and a friction means is provided on the exterior of the lower abutment 60, such as the friction springs 64, to resist rotation of the lower abutment 60 within the casing C.

The setting means S which is releasable as hereinafter explained includes the slotted collet-sleeve 66 having exterior teeth adapted to engage the threads 62 on the interior of the lower abutment 60. The upper end of the collet-sleeve 66 is releasably secured to the lower end of the tubular support 10 by the shear pins 68. Additionally, the interior of the tubular support 10 is provided with a groove 70 adapted to receive projection 72 on the exterior of the collet-sleeve 66. As shown, the projection 72 is held in the groove 70 by the support collar 34, such collar 34 being spaced inwardly from the lower end of the tubular support 1t) only a sufficient distance to provide the space necessary for the collet-sleeve 66 therebetween with the projection 72 on the sleeve 66 received in the groove 70. Thus, the structure so-described provides a relative longitudinal movement between the lower end of the tubular support 10 and the lower abutment 60 responsive to rotation of the tubular support. Additionally, the registering arcuate slots 74 as best shown in FIGURE 6 are cut in the lower exterior of the tubular support 10 and the upper exterior of the collet sleeve 66 immediately adjacent thereto to receive the arcuate segment keys 76 which are secured to tubular support 10. This slot and key connection provides a means preventing relative rotation between the tubular support 10 and the threaded portion of the collet-sleeve 66.

The details of the structure of the setting means S may be more clearly seen from FIGURES and 8, it being understood that the collet sleeve 66 is provided with longitudinally extending slots through the central portion thereof to provide flexibility to allow the central portion of the sleeve 66 to bend inwardly when the support collar 34 is removed from supporting engagement to allow projection 72 to disengage from within the groove 70 as hereinafter explained in relation to the straight pull release.

Referring to FIGURE 7, which is a layout of the grooves in the upper abutment 12, it may be seen that two grooves are provided to engage diametrically opposite pins 24 and that each groove opens upwardly for the insertion of the pins in the grooves when the collar 22 and the valve sleeve 28 with the support collar 34 attached thereto are inserted within the tubular support 10. To understand the operation of the device, the respective positions of the pins 24 in the grooves in the upper abutment 12 are labeled. As shown, the pins 24 are in the position designated as a in running the device into the well bore. This position is clearly shown in FIGURE 1. It should be noted that in the FIGURES 1, 2 and 2 that the pins 24 and the shear pins 26 in the right-hand sectional portion of each of these views, are shown in dotted lines to indicate that their position has been rotated for illustration, such position actually being diametrically opposite the pin 24 and the shear pin 26, shown in the lefthand portion of each of the views.

In operation, the well packer shown in the drawings is lowered through the well casing C with the components positioned as shown in FIGURE 1. The pins 24 are positioned in the position a in the I-slots within the upper portion of the upper abutment 12 and the collar 22 is releasably secured to the upper abutment 12 by shear pins 26. Shear pin 44 prevents upper expander 42 from moving upwardly to partially set the packing assembly P and the shear pin 54, which connects the upper gripping elements 52 to the upper expander 42, prevents the inadvertent setting of the anchoring assembly A. The lower expander 58 is supported on the shoulder 18. The collet sleeve 66 is supported by the support collar 34 with its projection 72 in the internal groove 70 in the end of the tubular support 10, and the collet-sleeve 66 is releasably connected to tubular support by shear pins 68 and is further in threaded engagement with the threads 62 on the lower abutment 60.

When the well packer has been lowered to the level at which it is desired to be set, assuming the threads 62 are right-hand threads, the tubing string T will be rotated clockwise when viewed from above in FIGURE 1. This allows the pins 24 in position a in the grooves in the upper abutment 12 t-o rotate the upper abutment 12, the tubular support 10 and the collet sleeve 66. This rotation threads the collet-sleeve 66 downwardly on the threads 62 so that the distance between the upper abutment 12 and the lower abutment 60 is shortened causing the packing and anchoring assemblies A to move to set position. It should be noted that the lower abutment 60 is prevented from rotating within the casing C by the friction springs 64. The initial relative movement upward of the lower abutment 60 in relation to tubular support 10 causes the lower expander 58 to move under the lower gripping slips 56 and also will move the anchor body 46 upwardly to shear the shear pin 54 and to shear the shear pin 44 whereby the upper expander 42 is moved upwardly compressing the packing element 36 and also the anchor body 46 is moved up to set the upper gripping elements 52 at the same time the lower expander 58 is wedging the lower gripping elements 56 outwardly into set position. When the gripping elements 52 and 56 are completely wedged into pipe-gripping position with the interior of the well casing C, the anchoring assembly is set and at the same time the packing assembly also is set, with packing element 36 being compressed between upper abutment 12 and upper expander 42 to move radially outward into sealing engagement with the interior of the casing C.

During the setting of the packing and anchoring assemblies, the pin 24 remains in the position a in the J-slot in the upper abutment 12. When both assemblies are completely set, the tubing string T is lowered, shearing the pins 26 and thereby moving the pins 24 downwardly to position b illustrated in FIGURE 7. In this position, the valve sleeve 28 has also been lowered to the extent that the port 30 is sealed from communication with the upper exterior of the well packer by the engagement of the packing 32 with the interior of the tubular support 10 as shown in FIGURE 2. It should also be noted that the support collar 34 has moved downwardly to the position illustrated in FIGURE 2 and completely supports the interior of collet-sleeve 66 to prevent projection 72 on the collet-sleeve 66 from disengaging from within the groove 70 on the interior of the tubular support 10.

With the packing and anchoring assemblies in set position and with the by-pass closed, as shown in FIGURE 2, pressures from above or below the packing assembly P are transmitted by the structure to maintain the set position of the anchoring assembly A. For example, a pressure above the packing element 36 exerts a force downwardly on the packing element 36 which is transmitted to the upper expander 42 to urge the upper expander 42 further under the upper gripping elements 52 and thereby assure that set position is maintained. If desired, the teeth on the upper gripping elements 52 may be sloped downwardly to allow them to hold more firmly against a downward movement. Also, a pressure below the packing element 36 is transmitted to the upper abutment 12 through the tubular support `10, the setting means S, and the lower abutment 60 to urge the lower expander 58 further under the lower gripping elements 56 to thereby urge them into tighter gripping engagement with the interior of the casing C. If desired, the teeth on the lower gripping elements 56 may be sloped upwardly to assure that they hold against upward movement.

With the packing and anchoring assemblies in set posi# tion, it is generally desired to rotate the tubing string clockwise to move the pins 24 into the position c. If tubing weight is to be exerted by the tubing string on the collar 22, the pins 24 remain in this position. If not, the pressure from below the tubing string may lift the tubing string and the collar 22 t-o position the pins 24 in the position d. In this position, the configuration of the slot is such that pressure can no longer lift the collar 22 and the valve sleeve 28, and holds the packing 32 in sealing engagement with the interior of the tubular support to thereby maintain the by-pass closed. Also, in position d, the tubing string T can be hung in tension. This tension force and any pressure forces are transmitted through the upper abutment, the tubular support 10, the lower abutment 60 to the lower expander 58 to urge the lower expander 58 upwardly into tighter engagement with the lower gripping elements 56 and thereby assure that the gripping elements 56 hold against upward movement. When it is desired to remove the well packer from the well bore, assuming the pins 24 are in the position d, the tubing string is rotated clockwise while allowing the string to settle slightly to move the pins 24 into the position e. Thereafter, the tubing string is lifted to position the pins 24 in approximately the position g in FIGURE 7. In this position, the by-pass is opened, the seal 32 having been lifted out of engagement with the interior of the tubular support 10, and the release may be accomplished by a counterclockwise rotation of the tubing string T to cause the setting means S, the collet-sleeve 66, to thread upwardly on the lower abutment 60. This moves the tubular support and the upper abutment 12 upwardly allowing the packing element 36 to relax. On continued movement, the snap ring 14 engages the upper expander 42 and pulls it from under the upper gripping elements 52, thereby effecting their release, and the snap ring 16 engages the body ring 48 to pull the gripping elements 56 upwardly and olf the lower expander 58, thereby completing release of the well packer.

In the event that such release is not possible, the well packer may be released by a straight upward pull on the tubing string as hereinafter described in reference to FIG- URE 3. The straight upward pull moves the pins 24 into the position f as illustrated in FIGURE 7. The force of this upward pull is concentrated on the shear pins 68. In this position, the support collar 34 is lifted above the central portion of the collet sleeve 66 and the by-pass is opened. The shearing of the pins 68 occurs at the same time the projection 72 moves out of the grooves 70. This movement is possible since the collet-sleeve 66 is slotted to allow the central portion thereof, including the projection 72 to flex 'mwardly responsive to such forces. It should be noted that the projection 72 and the groove 70 are tapered to facilitate this inward flexing of the central portion of the collet-sleeve 66. Once the pin 68 has sheared, and the projection 72 has moved out of the groove 70, the upper abutment is lifted by the engagement of the pins in the upper end of the slot position f, as shown. The upward movement of the upper abutment 12 relaxes the packing assembly P, causes the snap ring 14 to engage and pull the upper expander 42 from under the upper gripping elements 52 and causes the snap ring 16 to engage the body ring 48 of the anchor body 46, pulling the lower gripping elements 56 off of the lower expander 58. The shoulder 18 on the tubular support 10 supports the lower expander 58 and the lower abutment 60 for retrieval of the well packer from the well bore after the packing and anchoring assemblies have been unset in this manner as illustrated in FIGURE 3.

With the packing and anchoring assemblies in set position, the tubing string T, the collar 22, the valve sleeve 28 and the collar support 34 may be removed from the set well packer by rotating the tubing string T counterclockwise and lifting to position the pins 24 in the open end of the slots in the upper abutment 12, thereby allowing removal. This removal is sometimes necessitated to replace the packing 32. As can be seen, it may be accomplished without the removal of the remainder of the well packer from its set position. Thereafter, with the packing 32 replaced in the collar 22, the valve sleeve 28 and the backing collar 34, may again be lowered and landed with the pins 24 moving in the slots back to position c or a', as desired.

From the foregoing it can be seen that the present invention provides a well tool such as a well packer or anchor which is adapted to remain in set position in the well but allows the tubing string on which it is run, to be removed therefrom, includes provision for unsetting and retrieval of the complete unit from the well bore, either by rotation of the tubing string or by a straight upward pull exerted on the tubing string and also provides a controlled by-pass. This device is relatively simple to operate and of inexpensive and rugged construction.

The foregoing disclosure and description of the invention are illustrative and explanatory thereof, and various changes in the size, shape and materials, as well as in the details of the illustrated construction, may be made within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A permanent-type well tool adapted to be set in a well bore, comprising a tubular support,

an upper abutment secured to said tubular support,

means for releasably connecting a tubing string to said tubular support,

an anchoring assembly mounted on said tubular support below said upper abutment and having gripping elements adapted to be moved outwardly into pipegripping position in a well bore,

a lower abutment connected to said anchoring assembly,

a valve sleeve adapted to be connected to a tubing string and delining a by-pass port,

said valve sleeve adapted to extend downwardly through said tubular support when the tubing string to which it is connected is connected by said releasable connecting means to said tubular support,

setting means threadedly engaging said lower abutment,

means releasably connecting said setting means to said tubular support,

said valve sleeve in one position preventing release of the connection of said setting means to said tubular support,

said valve sleeve and said tubing string being free to slide longitudinally with respect to said tubular suppo-rt, when said anchoring assembly is set, to open and close said by-pass port and to prevent and allow release of the connection of said setting means to said tubular support,

said anchoring assembly being set by rotation of said tubing string in one direction and released by a counter-rotation of said tubing string,

said anchoring assembly also being unset by lifting of said tubing string to release the connection of said setting means to said tubular support. 2. A well tool according to claim 1, including a packing assembly having a packing element adapted to seal against the interior of the well bore when set,

said packing assembly being mounted on said tubular support and adapted to be set and unset with the setting and unsetting of said anchoring assembly.

3. A well tool according to claim 1, wherein said setting means includes,

a collet-sleeve,

the central portion of said collet-sleeve being slotted to render the central portion flexible, and

external projections on said central portion of said collet-sleeve,

said tubular support defining an internal groove adapted to receive said projections whereby lifting of said tubing string to unset said anchoring assembly, disengages said projection from said groove.

4. A well tool according to claim 1, wherein said valve sleeve in its lower position supports the central portion of said collet-sleeve to prevent disengagement of said projections from said groove in said tubular support.

5. A well tool according to claim 1, wherein said connecting means between said tubing string and said tubular support includes a slot, and

a pin adapted to engage in and disengage from said slot,

said slot defining a plurality of positions for said pin whereby after setting said tubing string may be hung in tension without unsetting said anchoring assembly.

6. A well tool according to claim 5, including a shear pin securing said tubing string to said tubular support in running position.

7. A Well tool according to claim 5, wherein one of the pin positions in said slot transmits the setting rotation of said tubing string to said tubular support, and

another of the pin positions in said slot opens said bypass and transmits unsetting rotation of lsaid tubing string to said tubular support.

8. A well tool according to claim 5, wherein said slot is defined by said upper abutment,

said pin is connected to said tubing string and includa reinforcing sleeve secured to said upper abutment and surrounding the slotted portion thereof.

9. A well tool according to claim 1, including means preventing relative rotation between said tubular support and said setting means.

10. A Well tool according to claim 3, including said tubular support and said collet-sleeve dening arcuate registering slots, and

keys positioned in said arcuate slots and secured to one of said tubular supports and said collet-sleeve to prevent relative rotation therebetween.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,555,648 6/1951 Kofahl 166--129 2,841,224 7/1958 Baker et al. 166-129 2,884,072 4/1959 Brown 166--139 3,283,821 1l/1966 Brown 166-139 JAMES A. LEPPINK, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2555648 *Apr 10, 1945Jun 5, 1951Baker Oil Tools IncWell packer
US2841224 *Apr 25, 1952Jul 1, 1958Baker Oil Tools IncWell packer and circulation joint
US2884072 *Jul 9, 1956Apr 28, 1959Brown Cicero CSafety valve for well pipes
US3283821 *Dec 5, 1963Nov 8, 1966Brown Cicero CScrew-set packer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4049055 *Apr 30, 1971Sep 20, 1977Brown Oil Tools, Inc.Gravel pack method, retrievable well packer and gravel pack apparatus
US4361353 *Aug 26, 1980Nov 30, 1982Sub-Surface Tools, Inc.Method and apparatus for retrieving wear bushings of various diameters
US5058671 *Aug 13, 1990Oct 22, 1991Lindsey Completion Systems, Inc.Pipe insert assembly
US5058672 *Aug 13, 1990Oct 22, 1991Lindsey Completion Systems, Inc.Landing collar and float valve assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/123, 166/139, 166/129
International ClassificationE21B23/00, E21B23/06
Cooperative ClassificationE21B23/06
European ClassificationE21B23/06
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 5, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: HUGHES TOOL COMPANY A CORP. OF DE
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:BROWN OIL TOOLS, INC. A TX CORP.;REEL/FRAME:003967/0348
Effective date: 19811214