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Publication numberUS3392916 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 16, 1968
Filing dateNov 22, 1966
Priority dateDec 8, 1965
Also published asDE1475194A1
Publication numberUS 3392916 A, US 3392916A, US-A-3392916, US3392916 A, US3392916A
InventorsEngstrom Carl-Gunnar Daniel, Herzog Paul
Original AssigneeCarl Gunnar Daniel Engstrom, Herzog Paul
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ultrasonic atomizer
US 3392916 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 16, 1968 CARL-GUNNAR D. ENGSTR'O'M ETAL 3,392,916

ULTRASONI C AT OMI ZER Filed Nov. 22, 1966 Fig.1

I NVENTOR 1 w m 1U R S Fm W vi M z ar e H DL TU a P W a f I: m m C 3,392,916 ULTRASONIC ATOMIZER Carl-Gunnar Daniel Engstriim, Aluddsvagen 3, Stockholm, Sweden, and Paul Herzog, Nybodagatan 7, Solna, Sweden Filed Nov. 22, 1966, Ser. No. 596,175 Claims priority, application Sweden, Dec. 8, 1965, 15,903/ 65 4 Claims. (Cl. 239102) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An ultrasonic atomizer to form aerosols having a chamber through which a current of gas flows and in which an ultrasonic vibrator is located. The liquid to be atomized is fed to the vibrating face of the vibrator.

The present invention relates to an ultrasonic atomizer for atomizing liquids and forming an aerosol.

The atomization of liquids by means of an ultrasonic vibrator is associated with several problems. Among the most important of these are the damping effect when supplying excess of liquid to the vibrating body, the difiiculty of controlling the amount of liquid atomized per unit of time and the problem of insulating the current supply lead in those cases, where the vibrating body is wholly or partly surrounded by liquid. These problems have not been acceptably solved in known ultrasonic atomizers, in view of which the atomizers have not gained a desired broad application.

The present invention aims at solving said problems, whereby an ultrasonic atomizer is obtained which in view of its reliability and simple design has a many-facetted use.

The ultrasonic atomizer according to the invention for atomizing liquids and forming an aerosol comprises an atomizing chamber having a gas inlet and a gas outlet, and a vibrating body arranged in the atomizing chamber and having a vibrating surface, which is adapted to receive liquid for atomization from liquid supply means, the vibrating surface being arranged inclined, preferably essentially vertically, and the liquid supply means being so arranged relative to the vibrating surface, that the liquid in the supply means is in continuous liquid contact with the liquid atomized at the vibrating surface. The liquid supply means may comprise a liquid supply tube opening adjacent to the vibrating surface and the mouth of which is bevelled so as to be essentially parallel with the vibration surface and possible engages same with its outmost tip, the liquid supply tube suitably being elastically suspended.

In a particular embodiment of the invention the liquid supply means comprises a device, for instance a displacement pump, giving a controllable constant flow of liquid to the vibrating surface.

The invention will now be described by an example with reference to the appended drawing, wherein FIG. 1 shows, partly in section, an embodiment of the ultrasonic atomizer according to the invention, and FIG. 2 shows, on an enlarged scale, a detail of the ultrasonic atomizer of FIG. 1.

The ultrasonic atomizer shown in FIG. 1 comprises a container, generally designated 1, having side walls 3, one end wall 5 integral therewith and one removable end wall 7 attached to the side walls 3 by means of screws 9. In order to obtain sealing a gasket 11 is clamped between the removable end wall 7 and the side walls 3 of the container. The container has a gas inlet 13 arranged in the end wall 5 and a gas outlet 15 centrally positioned in the removable end wall. 7. In the lower part of the container 1 a drain tube 17 having a shut-01f cock 19 is provided.

nited States Patent 0 3,392,916 Patented July 16, 1968 An ultrasonic vibrator 21 is arranged in the removable end wall 7 and extends inwardly into the container 1 and ends in a vertical vibrating surface 23, the vibrator being supplied with high frequency current through a coaxial cable 25.

The liquid to be atomized is stored in a bottle 27, which is suspended in a bracket 29 upside down. The bottle can be an ordinary hospital drop flask, used for instance when giving blood transfusions. The bottle 27 is sealed by means of a plug 30 penetrated by a liquid discharge tube 31 and an air inlet tube 33 extending above the free surface of the liquid in the bottle. A flexible hose 35 provided with a hose clamp 37 is connected to the tube 31. The hose 35 leads to the inlet of a pump P, the outlet of which is connected to a liquid supply tube 39. This tube 39 is received in an aperture in the upper side of the container 1, the tube being arranged in a plug 41, for instance made of rubber. The mouth 43 of the liquid supply tube 39 is bevelled so as to be adapted to the vibrating surface 23, adjacent to which it opens. The inclination oz of the tube 39 relative to the vertical plane coinciding with the vibrating surface 23 should be small as possible and suitably less than 30.

FIG. 2 shows, on an enlarged scale, a section through the pump P. The pump is a so-called displacement pump and consists of a pump housing 51 having an inlet 53 and an outlet 55, and pump elements 57, 59, having opposite rotational directions.

Briefly, the function of the apparatus is the following:

A continuous flow of carrier gas is supplied to the container 1 through the gas inlet 13, the gas outlet 15 being connected to a device to which an aerosol is to be supplied, for instance a respirator, an oil burner or the like. When the flow of carrier gas has been adjusted to a suitable value the ultrasonic vibrator 21 and the pump P is started after opening the hose clamp 37. The pump speed is adjusted to provide a suitable liquid flow and a predetermined amount of liquid per unit of time is now supplied to the vibrating surface 23, where it is successively atomized when leaving the mouth 43 of the tube 39, and the atomized liquid is then carried by the carrier gas out through the outlet 15.

By using the arrangement suggested several advantages are gained. By means of the displacement pump an ac curate supply of liquid is provided. In view of the vertical arrangement of the vibrating surface there is no risk of damping the vibrations of the vibrating body when supplying excess of liquid, as non-atomized liquid immediately flows off from the vibrating surface, the efficiency of the ultrasonic vibrator thus being unchanged. The liquid flown off from the vibrating surface can be discharged from the container 1 through the tube 17 at regular intervals by opening the cock 19. Thanks to the fact that the ultrasonic vibrator does not come into contact with the liquid, except, of course, at the vibrating surface, the insulating problem at the point of connection of the current supply cable is essentially facilitated.

The present invention thus provides an ultrasonic atomizer which, in view of its ability to generate an aerosol having a well defined composition, has a multifarious use. It may for instance be used in respirators for the supply of moisture, anaesthetica, etc., in flame spectrometry for the generation of an aerosol containing the element to be analyzed for the supply of fuels in diesel engines, oil burners, jet motors, etc.

The invention is, of course, not limited to the embodiment shown in the drawing. Thus, the pump P may be removed, the supply of liquid being controlled by changing the height of the flask 27 or contracting the hose clamp 37. The pump P can be of any type but is preferably a displacement pump giving a continuous flow of liquid. The pump can be supplied with liquid from a iquid container of any design and can be supplied with iquid under pressure or operate with self-suction. Nor s it necessary that the vibrating surface is positioned Iertically. The important thing is that said surface has [11 inclination which gives an efiicient runoff from the Iibrating body so as to prevent damping of the vibrations )f said body. Generally, the angle between the vibrating :urface and the vertical should be less than 45".

What is claimed is:

1. Ultrasonic atomizer for atomizing liquids and formng an aerosol, comprising an atomizing chamber having t gas inlet and a gas outlet, and a vibrating body arranged n the atomizing chamber and having a vibrating surace, which is adapted to receive liquid for atomization rom liquid supply means, in which the vibrating surface 5 arranged inclined, preferably essentially vertically, and he liquid supply means are so arranged relative to the 'ibrating surface, that the liquid in the supply means s in continuous liquid contact with the liquid atomized .t the vibrating surface.

2. Ultrasonic atomizer according to claim 1, in which he liquid supply means comprises a liquid supply tube 4 opening adjacent to the vibrating surface and the mouth of which is bevelled so as to be essentially parallel with the vibration surface and possibly engages same with its outmost tip, the liquid supply tube suitably being elastically suspended.

3. Ultrasonic atomizer according to claim 1 or 2, in which the liquid supply means comprises a device, for instance a displacement pump, giving a controllable constant flow of liquid to the vibrating surface.

4. Ultrasonic atomizer according to any of the preceding claims, in which a liquid drain means is positioned in the lower part of the atomizing chamber.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,939,302 12/1933 Heaney 239-102 3,038,532 6/1962 Eisenkraft 1594 3,200,873 8/1965 Young et al. 158-77 3,214,101 10/1965 Perron 239-102 EVERETT W. KIRBY, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1939302 *Apr 12, 1929Dec 12, 1933Edward B BenjaminApparatus for and art of carburation
US3038532 *Jan 12, 1960Jun 12, 1962Eisenkraft Bernard JSpray process equipment
US3200873 *Jun 4, 1962Aug 17, 1965Exxon Research Engineering CoUltrasonic burner
US3214101 *Mar 31, 1964Oct 26, 1965Little Inc AApparatus for atomizing a liquid
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3648929 *Feb 8, 1971Mar 14, 1972Battelle Memorial InstituteAtomizer
US3700170 *Jun 2, 1971Oct 24, 1972Ceskoslovenska Akademie VedGenerator of monodisperse aerosols
US3804329 *Jul 27, 1973Apr 16, 1974J MartnerUltrasonic generator and atomizer apparatus and method
US3860173 *Mar 27, 1974Jan 14, 1975Sata NaoyasuNon-polluting combustion engine having ultrasonic fuel atomizer in place of carburetor
US4038348 *May 30, 1975Jul 26, 1977Kompanek Harry WUltrasonic system for improved combustion, emission control and fuel economy on internal combustion engines
US4085893 *Sep 3, 1976Apr 25, 1978Durley Iii Benton AUltrasonic humidifiers, atomizers and the like
US4109863 *Aug 17, 1977Aug 29, 1978The United States Of America As Represented By The United States Department Of EnergyApparatus for ultrasonic nebulization
US4301093 *Jul 25, 1980Nov 17, 1981Bosch Siemens Hausgerate GmbhAtomizer for liquid
US4582654 *Sep 12, 1984Apr 15, 1986Varian Associates, Inc.Nebulizer particularly adapted for analytical purposes
US5011632 *Feb 7, 1990Apr 30, 1991Shimizu Construction Co., Ltd.Ultrasonic fragrance generation apparatus
US5030253 *Oct 31, 1990Jul 9, 1991Shimizu Construction Co., Ltd.Blowing air into liquid to produce mist
US5071621 *Jan 19, 1989Dec 10, 1991Shimizu Construction Co. Ltd.Method of supplying scents to a room of a motor vehicle
US5443059 *Jan 14, 1994Aug 22, 1995Dragerwerk AgUltrasonic atomizer with a metering unit
US5950619 *Mar 14, 1996Sep 14, 1999Siemens AktiengesellschaftFor atomizing a fluid
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US6601581Nov 1, 2000Aug 5, 2003Advanced Medical Applications, Inc.Method and device for ultrasound drug delivery
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US6964647Oct 6, 2000Nov 15, 2005Ellaz BabaevNozzle for ultrasound wound treatment
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Classifications
U.S. Classification239/102.2, 239/4, 181/141, 261/1, 261/DIG.480, 366/108, 366/101
International ClassificationB05B17/06, A61M16/18, A61M15/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S261/48, B05B17/0623, A61M16/18, A61M15/0085
European ClassificationA61M16/18, B05B17/06B2, A61M15/00F