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Publication numberUS3392921 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 16, 1968
Filing dateApr 6, 1967
Priority dateApr 6, 1967
Publication numberUS 3392921 A, US 3392921A, US-A-3392921, US3392921 A, US3392921A
InventorsDemaison Raymond J
Original AssigneeQuigley Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lateral discharge spray nozzle
US 3392921 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 16, 1968 R. J DEMAISON LATERAL DISCHARGE SPRAY NOZZLE Original Filed Oct. 7, 1964 3 Sheets-Sheet, l

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LATERAL DISCHARGE SPRAY NOZZLE Original Filed Oct. 7, 1964 3 Sheets-Sheet 22a Z/a INVENTOR. i. J pEMA/SON %W,w M Z n TTORNQS.

July 16, 1968 R, J. DEMAISON 3,392,921

LATERAL DISCHARGE SPRAY NOZZLE Origifial Filed-Oct. v, 1964 s Sheets-Sheet z I NVENTOR.

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United States Patent 3,392,921 LATERAL DISCHARGE SIRAY NOZZLE Raymond J. Demaison, Mount Vernon, N.Y., assignor to Quigley Company, Inc., a corporation of New York Continuation of abandoned application Ser. No. 402,203, Oct. 7, 1964. This application Apr. 6, 1967, Ser. No.

7 Claims. or. 239-589) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A lateral discharge spray nozzle for handling fluent granular refractory material and comprising a straight elongated tubular main portion and an open ended smooth bore angularly disposed tubular branch portion, with a material collecting reservoir at the closed end of the main portion for absorbing the full impact of the refractory material entering said portion and for deflecting said material into the branch portion.

This application is a true continuation of application Ser. No. 402,203, filed Oct. 7, 1964, now abandoned.

This invention relates to the art of repairing the linings of high temperature furnaces by spraying thereon fluent refractory materials which are highly abrasive.

The primary object of the invention is to provide a discharge nozzle of the lateral spray type for deflecting a stream of such fluent abrasive material from a supply pipe with a minimum amount of wear on the component parts thereof.

Another object of the invention is to provide a discharge spray nozzle which may be inexpensively fabricated from standard pipe or tubing and the parts welded together as a unit.

A further object of the invention is to provide a discharge spray nozzle which is extremely versatile in its application and use, in that it may be used with dry fluent refractory materials with the mixing taking place in the nozzle or with premixed fluent materials in slurry form fed to the nozzle from a supply source. The nozzle is also designed to break up the stream of fluent material, whether dry or wet, when it is desired to have the material completely aerated and broken up into very minute particles.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a discharge spray nozzle in which there is no throttling effect unless necessary for certain spray patterns and wherein, if it is so desired, an increased impetus may be added to the flowing mass or its impetus decreased as it is being discharged.

The herein disclosed discharge spray nozzle comprises a tubular main portion closed at one end, as by a pipe cap, and open at the other end for attachment to a suitable supply pipe, said tubular main portion being of such size as to allow the fluent abrasive refractory material to enter the nozzle in full volume and at full pressure from said supply pipe. According to the present invention, the tubular main portion is formed with an angularly disposed tubular branch portion preferably having the same flow area as said tubular main portion and arranged to discharge the fluent abrasive refractory material therefrom at a selected angle, said tubular branch portion being located in advance of the closed end of the tubular main portion so as to thus create within the tubular main portion a material collecting reservoir for assisting in the redirection of the flow of the material into the tubular branch portion for discharge therefrom.

The design and assembly of the discharge spray nozzle is extremely simple and efiicient and allows for reversal of the nozzle on the supply pipe to spray in either direction. This reversible feature permits the nozzle to be used "ice for spraying the entire walls and roof of open hearth furnaces as well as the linings of cylindrical furnaces such as the electric Kaldo and Linz-Donowitz furnaces, etc.

As another feature of the invention, the addition of another smaller angularly disposed tubular branch portion on the side of the tubular main portion opposite the tubular discharge branch portion, and preferably but not necessarily in axial alignment therewith, allows the use of air or water or suitable combinations of both for mixing the refractory material in the nozzle and for increasing the velocity of the material discharged therefrom as well as breaking up the material into the minutest particles when so desired.

As still another feature of the invention, the tubular discharge branch portion, adjacent the re-directing surface of the material collecting in the reservoir, is fitted with a protective lip to prevent wear on the far side of said branch portion. It has been found that the use of this protective lip will cause a decrease in the velocity of the outside layer of the stream of fluent abrasive material directed into the discharge branch portion immediately above said lip and thus reduce erosion and allow the nozzle to be used for a much longer time without replacement.

Referring to the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal cross section of the discharge spray nozzle in its simplest form;

FIG. 2 is a similar cross section of the discharge spray nozzle shown in FIG. 1 with the addition of a protective lip at the entrance to the tubular discharge branch portion;

FIG. 3 is a similar cross section of the discharge spray nozzle shown in FIG. 1 but with the addition of another angularly disposed tubular inlet branch portion smaller in size than the tubular discharge branch portion;

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view of an open hearth furnace and shows the discharge spray nozzle of FIG. 1 or FIG 2 mounted on the ends of suitable pipes for spraying the hearth, walls and roof of said furnace;

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view similar to FIG. 4 but showing the discharge spray nozzle of FIG. 3 mounted on the ends of the supply pipes;

FIG. 6 is a longitudinal cross section similar to FIG. 1 but showing a modification thereof; and

FIG. 7 is similar to FIG. 6 but depicting the flow portion of the refractory material as it is discharged.

Referring to FIG. 1, the discharge spray nozzle comprises a tubular main portion 10 closed at one end by a cap 11 and open at the other end for attachment to a supply pipe 12. The supply pipe 12 shown in this figure may be a coupling with a suitable length of pipe screwed therein to allow the nozzle to be maneuvered in the furnace to reach all areas to be sprayed. It may also be a suitable length of pipe with a flexible conduit attached thereto but in all instances whatever means is used to convey the fluent abrasive refractory material to the nozzle should be so sized as to provide a maximum flow of material to said nozzle. The tubular main portion 10 is provided with a straight open-ended smooth-bore angularly disposed tubular branch portion 13 which is suitably formed at its junction for fitting and welding onto an outlet hole 14 milled at a suitable angle in the main portion 10. As will be noted from the drawings, the bore of the tubular branch portion 13 is smooth throughout its entire length so as to offer no interference or disturbance with the refractory material flowing therethrough. The angles that the branch portion 13 may assume range from 10 to as indicated by the segment of a circle shown by the arrows on FIG. 1. In actual operation, the fluent abrasive refractory material fills up the pocket 15 created in the tubular main portion 10 beyond the tubular branch portion 13 and forms a reservoir which will deflect said fluent abrasive refractory material into the angularly disposed branch portion 13 without undue wear on the component parts of the nozzle. As clearly shown in FIGS. 1 to 3, the reservoir 15 is of a depth substantially greater than the diameter .of the tubular main portion, whereby when the nozzle is in use the refractory material will collect therein and absorb the full impact of the refractory material entering the tubular main portion as Well as deflect the infiowing refractory material through the outlet hole 14 into the tubular branch portion. It is also possible under certain conditions to make the branch portion 13 slightly smaller or slightly larger in diameter than the main portion 10, as for example where it is desired to control the flow pattern more closely.

It goes without saying that there will be some wear on the inside surfaces .of the angularly disposed branch portion 13, especially on the inside surface at 16 which must actually take the brunt of the wear, but the design of the nozzle is such that it can readily be made from pipe or tubing and thus is made and assembled at a relatively low cost, which does not make it too costly to replace or rebuild.

With reference to FIG. 2, there is shown a protective lip 17 formed on the tubular main portion and extending across the opening leading into the angularly disposed branch portion 13, said lip providing a control means for preventing the stream of fluent abrasive material from wearing out the inside surface 16 of the branch portion 13. The protective lip 17 provides a sheltered area above it which is of the full width of the lip as the branch portion is entered where maximum wear will occur but which tapers off to nothing in both directions halfway around the circumference of said branch portion, leaving the other half free and clear. The sheltered area provides space for the fluent abrasive refractory material to cause eddy currents to form and thus change its direction with a consequent loss of linear velocity in this area which naturally is going to control the wear pattern therein. Once the fluent abrasive material is out of the sheltered area, it again is picked up by the main stream and its velocity increased back to the normal velocity of the flowing stream. It can thus be seen that the protruding lip 17 will provide a means for controlling the wear pattern on the inside face 16 of the angularly disposed branch portion 13. In addition, the lip 17 will increase the volume of the reservoir and advance the re-directing face of the accumulated material to help in reducing wear on the inside face 16 of the branch portion 13.

In FIG. 3, the tubular main portion 10 is shown as provided with a further angularly disposed tubular branch portion 18 smaller in size than the discharge branch portion 13 and arranged in axial alignment therewith although there may be occasions when it is desirable to locate the branch portion off center. This second (inlet) branch portion 18 is designed to discharge a stream of air or water or suitable combinations of both across the tubular main portion 10 into the tubular discharge branch portion 13. The stream of water or air and water will normally be used to mix the refractory material (whether completely dry or semi-dry) into a sprayable slurry but the stream will also act to break up the flowing abrasive material into very fine drops or particles and increase its velocity through the discharge portion 13. The protective lip 17 is not shown in FIG. 3 but may be added if so desired to reduce wear on surface 16.

The nozzle of FIG. 3 may therefore be used to discharge a stream of fluent abrasive material in wet slurry form with or without the use of an air blast or it may be used to take a stream of fluent abrasive material in dry form and mix it into wet slurry form by discharging water into said stream as it flows from the main portion 19 into the discharge portion 13.

It is evident that the instant design of discharge spray nozzle is one which is very versatile in its uses and appli- Cir cations and is one which assures longevity coupled with economical replacement either in whole or in part.

Reference is now made to FIG. 4 which is a cross sectional view of an open hearth furnace taken through one of the doors. The pipe 20a has assembled thereon a coupling 12 with a discharge spray nozzle of the type shown in FIG. 1 or 2 mounted on the outboard end. The tubular main portion 10 is closed at one end by the pipe cap 11 and open at the other end to receive the fluent abrasive material. The angularly disposed tubular branch portion 13 will redirect the material outwardly in a definite direction to allow the material to be sprayed on the walls and roof of an open hearth furnace. It is evident that, by the simple expedient of moving the pipe 20a back and forth across the width of the furnace, it is possible to spray practically the entire hearth, wall and roof area with the exception of the front portion. However, it is possible to reverse the nozzle on the pipe as shown on pipe 20b to thus allow the hearth, front walls and roof arch to be sprayed as desired. There is therefore no problem in spraying all portions of the furnace with the same nozzle. The angles of angularly disposed branch portion 13 may be varied to provide a series of nozzles with various angles and will allow all faces .of the furnace to be reached by the simple expedient of changing the nozzles or reversing the same nozzle on the supply pipe. When speed is desired, two nozzles with the chosen angles may be fitted to two different supply pipes.

In FIG. 5, the supply pipe 22a has assembled thereon a coupling 12 with a discharge spray nozzle of the type shown in FIG. 3 mounted on the outboard end. The second angularly disposed inlet branch portion 18 is coupled to a second supply pipe 21a which can supply the nozzle with either air or water or suitable combinations of both as desired. In this instance also, and as shown in FIG. 5, the nozzle may be reversed on another material supply pipe 22b and coupled to another water and air supply pipe 21b.

In all of the aforementioned disclosures it is possible to further control the spray pattern by the use of tubing shapes other than round, such as square, rectangular, octagonal, etc. If it is desired to produce a fan-shaped pattern the round tubing of the branch portion may be suitably flattened at the discharge end. In this case it is even possible to further control the spray pattern by using a flattened or other suitably shaped tube for the second branch portion 18 and in addition vary the angle of discharge of said portion with relation to the discharge branch portion.

It is also possible to further control the spray pattern by decreasing the velocity of the slurry when it is desired to apply it to the face of the furnace lining at close range and thus cut down rebound. This is accomplished by relieving the confining side of the angularly disposed discharge branch portion 13 on the side opposite the normal wear surface 16 as indicated by the heavy dotted line 25 in FIG. 1. As thus modified, the branch portion designated 13a is shown in FIG. 6 and where it will be seen the branch portion is cut away throughout substantially half of its circumference from a point X located at a distance Y from the opening leading into said branch portion. This distance Y should be great enough to insure the complete redirection of the refractory material from the main portion 10a into the branch portion 13a in cooperation with the uncutaway part of the branch portion. As shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, the cutaway part of the tubular branch portion 13a starts at a point more than halfway from the discharge end of said branch portion. As a result of this construction, the air entrained in the refractory material will be permitted to escape into the atmosphere without interfering with the flow of the material through the discharge portion. This effect is depicted in FIG. 7 in which the lines of flow of the refractory material are indicated by the arrows and the entrained air contained therein indicated by the stippling to thus show the air escaping as the refractory material is discharged without any change of direction or spray pattern. In this way the velocity of the particles of refractory material is reduced to a point where they have insufficient inertia to cause rebound.

While the above discharge nozzles have been particularly designed for use on open hearth furnaces, they may also be used to spray the linings of the Kaldo, Linz- Donowitz and Bessemer oxygen converters as well. In the latter instances, the vessel may be turned or the nozzle may be rotated to form a means for applying a continuous protective coating on the vessel linings.

What is claimed is:

1. A discharge spray nozzle for directing a high pressure stream of fluent granular refractory material from a supply pipe onto the refractory linings of high temperature furnaces to form a protective coating thereon, said spray nozzle comprising a straight elongated tubular main portion closed at one end and open at the other and attachable at its open end to the supply pipe, said tubular main portion having an inlet opening permitting the fluent granular refractory material to enter the same in full volume and at full pressure from said supply pipe and formed in its side wall with an outlet opening located in advance of its closed end to form between said outlet opening and said closed end a material collecting reservoir of a depth substantially greater than the diameter of the tubular main portion, whereby when the nozzle is in use, the refractory material will collect therein and absorb the full impact of the refractory material flowing into the tubular main portion and the cushioning effect of the build-up of refractory material beyond the outlet opening will be suflicient to cause redirection of said refractory material and consequently reduce wear on the far side of the outlet opening, as well as deflect the infiowing refractory material through said outlet opening, and said spray nozzle also comprising a straight open-ended smooth-bore angularly disposed tubular branch portion which is shorter than the tubular main portion and has one end communicating with the outlet opening in said tubular main portion and its other end free to discharge the fluent granular refractory material therethrough into the ambient atmosphere, the bore of said tubular branch portion being smooth throughout its entire length.

2. A discharge spray nozzle according to claim 1, wherein the axis of the tubular discharge branch portion is inclined with respect to the axis of the tubular main portion, and wherein said tubular branch portion is cut away in its side wall opposite its wall standing adjacent to the material collecting reservoir, said cut away portion starting at a point more than halfway from the discharge end of the tubular branch portion to insure the complete deflection of the granular refractory material through the outlet opening of the tubular main portion into the angularly disposed tubular branch portion.

3. A discharge spray nozzle according to claim 1, wherein the outlet opening from the tubular main portion adjacent the deflecting surface of the granular refractory material contained in the reservoir is formed with a protective lip extending only halfway around said opening to provide a sheltered area above it within the angularly disposed tubular branch portion for the formation of eddy currents within the sheltered area.

4. A discharge spray nozzle according to claim 1, wherein the tubular main portion is fitted on the side opposite the tubular discharge branch portion with another angularly disposed tubular inlet branch portion open at both ends in alignment with said tubular discharge branch portion and arranged to direct a stream of fluid into the fluent granular refractory material as it is being re-directed by the material collecting in the tubular reservoir from the tubular main portion into the tubular discharge branch portion.

5. A discharge spray nozzle according to claim 4, wherein the tubular inlet branch portion has a much smaller cross-sectional area than the tubular main portion and discharge branch portion.

6. A discharge spray nozzle according to claim 2, wherein the cutaway of the tubular discharge branch portion extends substantially through one-half the circumference of said portion.

7. A discharge spray nozzle for directing a high pressure stream of fluent granular refractory material from a supply pipe onto the refractory linings of high temperature furnaces to form a protective coating thereon, said spray nozzle comprising a straight elongated tubular main portion adapted to be attached to a closure at either end and to be attached at its opposite end to the supply pipe, said main portion having openings at each end so that regardless of which end is attached to the supply pipe granular refractory material is permitted to enter in full volume and full pressure from said supply pipe, said main portion being formed in its side wall with an outlet opening located intermediate said ends to form between said outlet opening and whichever end is not attached to said supply pipe a collecting reservoir of a length substantially greater than the diameter of the main portion whereby the cushioning effect of the build up of refractory material beyond the outlet opening is sufficient to cause redirection of said refractory material and to effectively reduce wear on the far side of the outlet opening, whereby when the nozzle is in use the refractory material will collect in whichever end is opposite to the supply pipe and is closed to absorb the full impact of the refractory material flowing into the tubular main portion from said supply pipe and protect the nozzle structure, and said spray nozzle also comprising a straight open-ended smooth-bore angularly disposed tubular branch portion which is shorter than the main portion and has one end communicating with the outlet opening in said tubular main portion and its other end free to discharge the fluent granular refractory material therethrough into the ambient atmosphere, the bore of said tubular branch portion being smooth throughout its entire length, said branch portion being such that when the supply pipe is connected to one end of the main portion the branch portion will discharge material in one direction and when the supply pipe is connected to the other end of the tubular main portion the branch portion will discharge material in the other direction whereby by merely reversing the ends of the main portion to which the supply pipe and the closure are attached different portions of a furnace lining may have refractory material discharged thereonto, said nozzle in use having one end attached to a supply pipe and the other attached to a closure.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 24,179 5/1859 McLeod 285 1,759,803 5/1930 Pysher et a1. 285-450 2,414,138 1/1947 Bruckner 2 39523 EVERETT W. KIRBY, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US24179 *May 24, 1859 Improvement in hose-couplings
US1759803 *Mar 9, 1929May 20, 1930Pysher Fred LPipe clean-out fitting
US2414138 *Mar 6, 1942Jan 14, 1947Kimble Glass CoNeedle for filling receptacles
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3643866 *Jun 15, 1970Feb 22, 1972Rain Jet CorpReverberating liquid discharge device
US4194530 *May 30, 1978Mar 25, 1980Universal Valve Co., Inc.Restrictive vent
US4768533 *Apr 30, 1987Sep 6, 1988Hall William RPaint and varnish stripping system
US4830060 *Nov 20, 1987May 16, 1989Proto Corp.Specialized pipefitting cover for insulated Y-shaped joint
US5642907 *May 20, 1996Jul 1, 1997Victaulic Company Of AmericaFor a water supply pipe
US5906316 *Sep 4, 1997May 25, 1999S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Nozzle to dispense active material
WO1997044607A1 *Apr 10, 1997Nov 27, 1997Victaulic Co Of AmericaEnd fitting for sprinkler system
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/589, 239/523, 285/125.1, 239/591, 239/598, 239/601
International ClassificationB24C5/04, B24C5/00, E04F21/12, E04F21/02
Cooperative ClassificationB24C5/04, E04F21/12
European ClassificationE04F21/12, B24C5/04