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Publication numberUS3393438 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 23, 1968
Filing dateJun 22, 1965
Priority dateJun 22, 1965
Also published asDE1590003A1, DE1590003B2, DE1590003C3
Publication numberUS 3393438 A, US 3393438A, US-A-3393438, US3393438 A, US3393438A
InventorsEarl Marley James, Vickery Jr John Roy
Original AssigneeAmp Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Crimping tool
US 3393438 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 23, 1968 J. E. MARLEY ETAL 3,393,438

v CRIMPING T001:

4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 22, 1965 July 23, 1968 J. E. MARLEY ETAL 3,393,438

CRIMPING TOOL 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 22, 1965 July 23, 1968 J, E. MARLEY ETAL 3,393,438

CRIMPING TOOL Filed June 22, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 J. E. MARLEY ETAL 3,393,438

July 23, 1968 CRIMPING TOOL 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed June 22, 1965 United States Patent 3,393,438 CRIMPING TOOL James Earl Marley, Middletown, and John Roy Vickery,

Jr., York, Pa., assignors to AMP Incorporated, Harrisburg, Pa.

Filed June 22, 1965, Ser. No. 466,000 7 Claims. (Cl. 29-203) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Apparatus for trimming the ends of wires extending towards each other and crimping an electrical connector onto the trimmed wire ends comprises a two-part crimping die divided along a medial transverse plane. Die parts are normally offset with respect to each other but are movable laterally with respect to each other into alignment. Wires are placed in die cavities of the two-parts of the die so that the wires in each die part overlap the other die part. Upon movement of die parts into alignment, wire ends are trimmed in the medial plane and trimmed ends are retained in die cavities. Die parts are then moved towards anvil so that connector supported on anvil is crimped onto wire ends.

Background of the invention This invention relates to devices for crimping electrical connecting devices onto the ends of wires.

An object of the invention is to provide an improved crimping device for crimping connectors and splices onto the ends of wires. A further object is to provide an improved device for making splice-type connections. A still further object is to provide an improved device for crimping splice-type connectors onto wires having means for trimming the wire ends immediately prior to crimping of the connector onto the wire. A still further object is to provide a crimping device capable of crimping an opensided connector onto a plurality of wires extending towards each other.

These and other objects of the invention are achieved in a preferred embodiment thereof comprising a wire joining member in the form of a crimping anvil for supporting an open-sided connector during crimping and another wire joining member in the form of a two-part crimping die divided along a plane extending transversely of its axis and intermediate its ends. The two parts of the crimping die have a trough-like cavity on their sides which face the anvil, the sidewalls of this cavity being contoured to bend the sidewalls of the connector relatively towards each other and into crimped engagement with a wire disposed on the anvil. The two parts of the die are disposed, when the die and anvil are apart or open, in offset parallel relationship with each other with the side of each die located laterally beyond the side of the cavity of the other die. Means are provided for moving the two parts of the die into alignment with each other so that their cavities are axially aligned and for thereafter moving the composite die towards the anvil. When it is desired to splice two wires extending from opposite directions towards each other, one wire is positioned in the cavity of each part of the die with its end portion extending beyond the plane of demarcation between the dies. In other words, each wire extends through a die cavity and then beyond the die cavity and parallel to the side of the other die part. When the two die parts are moved into axial alignment with each other, the ends of the wires are sheared by the cutting action of the side of one die part in cooperation with the side of the other die part. After the die parts are brought into axial alignment then, the two wires will be positioned in the aligned cavities of the ice die parts with their cut ends adjacent to each other. Upon subsequent movement of the die parts towards the anvil, the wires are positioned in the uncrimped connector and the sidewalls of the connector are crimped onto the wires.

In the drawing:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a crimped splicetype connection made by a tool in accordance with the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of an uncrimped connector;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional side view of one form of tool in accordance with the invention:

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary sectional front view taken along the lines 44 of FIGURE 6;

' FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary side view showing the two parts of the die in their non-aligned positions which they occupy at the beginning of the operating cycle;

FIGURES 6 and 7 are views similar to FIGURE 5 but showing the positions of the parts in successive stages of the operating cycle;

FIGURE 8 is a semi-schematic plan view showing the die parts in their non-aligned positions corresponding to the positions shown in FIGURE 5 FIGURE 9 is a view similar to FIGURE 8 but showing the parts in their aligned positions, this view being taken along the lines 9-9 of FIGURE 6; and

FIGURE 10 is a fragmentary perspective view of the die parts and the wire separator plates.

Referring first to FIGURES 1 and 2, a known type of open-sided connector 2 for making splice-type electrical connections comprises a generally U-shaped ferrule 4 having a pair of tongues 6 struck up from its base or web intermediate its ends. Each tongue is provided with a pair of side-by-side notches 8 having a width which is slightly less than the diameter of the metallic core of the wire. As discussed more fully in the co-pending application of James Earl Marley et al., Ser. No. 432,621, filed Feb. 15, 1965, now Patent No. 3,320,354, the wires are positioned in the connector and forced into the notches 6 and the sidewalls of the connector are bent into overlying relationship with the tongues. The wire insulation is penetrated by the sides of the notches to establish electrical contact with the core during such crimping of the connector. Two notches are provided in each tongue in order that the connector might be used to make a common splice among four wires although quite frequently only two wires 12, 14 are spliced with connectors of this type as shown in FIGURE 1. Advantageously, a film of suitable plastic such as Mylar (polyethylene terephthalate) is bonded to the external surface of the ferrule 4 and extends beyond the longitudinal edges of the sidewalls as shown at 16. The portions 16 of the film are tucked between the bent-over sidewalls in the crimped connection to electricallv insulate the completed splice.

The disclosed embodiment of the present invention is particularly intended to crimp a connector of the type shown at 2 onto the ends of wires and to trim the wire ends immediately prior to crimping so that they will be adjacent to each other in the connector after crimping.

Referring now to FIGURES 3 and 4, a hand tool 18, in accordance with the invention, comprises a pair of spaced-apart side plates 20, 22, these plates having gaps 24 on one side so that the tool is of the C-head type. The side plates are maintained in spaced-apart relationship by block means 26, 66, 68. The block 26 has an anvil 28 depending therefrom which provides a downwardly-facing surface 30 to support an uncrimped connector during the crimping operation.

A magazine, adapted to hold a supply of connectors, is contained between the side plates 20, 22 and extends rearwardly of the tool. This magazine is of generally channel-shaped cross section having a width equal to the length of an individual connector in order that the connectors can be contained between the sidewalls 34 of the magazine as illustrated in FIGURE 1. Ears 36 extend from opposite sides of the magazine intermediate its ends and a pin 38 extends through these cars and into the sidewalls to provide a pivotal mounting which permits the magazine to swing upwardly from the position 3 to the position of FIGURE 7. The stack of connectors contained in the magazine is urged leftwardly by a slidable block 46 disposed between the sidewalls 34 and connected to the end of a negator spring 44 which is coiled around a pin 42 extending between an additional pair of ears 40 on the magazine.

A retaining plate 50 is slidably disposed against the front side of the block 26 and normally projects beyond the surface 30 of the mandrel to function as a stop for the leading connector of the stack. It will thus be apparent that this leading connector is maintained on the anvil by the force of the spring 44. Plate 50 is movable upwardly from the position shown during crimping but is biased downwardly by means of a leaf spring 54. This retaining plate is confined against the surface of the block 26 by a plate 52 secured on each side to the spacer block 26.

The crimping die means which bends the sidewalls of the connector into engagement with the wire is formed in two parts 56, 58 which are divided along a medial plane extending transversely of the die axis intermediate its ends. The die means can be considered as two separate dies or as a single die divided in two sections. Each part, 56, 58, has a trough-like cavity 60 on its upper side, the sidewalls of these cavities being contoured in a manner such that they will cause bending of the connector sidewalls inwardly towards each other when the die, with its two parts in alignment to each other, is moved towards the anvil. Both parts 56, 58 of the die are mounted on a pin 62 adjacent to their lower ends and this pin extends through a pair of spaced-apart links 64 which are received in recesses on the opposed sides of the die parts. The links 64, which constitute a ram, extend downwardly through a recess in block means 66, which functions as a guide, and are pinned at their lower ends 70 to one end of a link 72. The other end of this link 72 is pivotally connected at 74 to a lever 76 which, in turn, is pivotally connected at its end 78 between the sides of a channel-shaped fixed handle 80. A plate 82 is secured to the left-hand end of the lever 76 and a spring 84 has one end connected to this plate and is anchored at its opposite end to a pin in the block means 66. The lever 76 and plate 82 thus constitute a bell crank pivoted at 78.

The free end of the lever 76 has a cam follower 86 thereon which bears against a contoured ca-m surface 88 of a block 90 secured to, and positioned between, the sides of a movable handle member 92. The upper end of this handle is pivotally mounted on a pin 96 which extends between the side plates 20, 22. It will be apparent that upon movement of the handle 92 towards the fixed handle 80, the lever 76 will be swung in a counterclockwise direction about its pivotal axis 78 thereby to drive the links 64 upwardly and to move the die relatively towards the anvil. The upper ends 98 of the sides of the handle 92 function as stops and bear against the rearward side 100 of the block means 68.

It 'will be understood that any suitable linkage can be employed to drive the crimping die towards the anvil, the above-described linkage being described more fully in US. Patent 3,029,670.

The die part 58 is pivotally mounted on the pin 62 and can be swung between the relative positions shown in FIGURES 3 and 6 when the die assembly is in its lowered (FIGURES 3, 4 and position. This pivotal movement of the die part 58 is permitted by a recess 124 in the spacer block 68. This recess does not extend past the die part 58 and the latter die part 56 cannot,

therefore, be similarly pivoted about the axis of pin 62. The wire ends are trimmed during movement of the die part 58 from the position of FIGURE 5 to the position of FIGURE 6. This movement of the die part 58 is accomplished by means of a yoke 102 extending transversely across the front side of the die parts and having legs 106, 108 projecting rearwardly beyond the ends of the die parts. The leg 108 bears slidably against the end 110 of the die part 56 while the leg 106 is secured to the end 111 of the die part 58 by a fastener 107. A handle 104 extends forwardly of the tool from the yoke 102 to permit the operator to swing the die part 58 from the position of FIGURE 3 to the position of FIGURE 6 before he squeezes the handle.

The abutting ends of the two die parts are provided with recesses 112, 114 (FIGURE 8) in which wire ep arator plates 116, 118 are contained. These two separator plates are provided with side-by-side notches 117 on their upper ends in which the wires are positioned at the beginning of the operating cycle as shown in FIGURE 8. Two such notches are provided to permit the crimping of a connector onto four separate wires, if desired, although only two wires are shown in FIG- URE 8.

The plates 116, 118 extend between the ram plates 64 and have slots 120 intermediate their ends through which the pin 62 extends in order to permit this pin and the die parts to move upwardly relative to the separator plates. Both separator plates have arcuate projections 122 on their lower ends which fit into complementary recesses in the spacer block 66 thereby to prevent upward movement of the separator plates during upward movement of the die assembly.

It is desirable to provide a means on each side of the tool for temporarily holding the wires during the crimping operation. Referring to FIGURE 4, this holding means comprises, for the left-hand side of the tool, a pin 126 secured to, and extending laterally from, the die part 56. A block 128 of resiliently rubbery material is mounted on the end of this pin and extends upwardly on the side of the die part 56. This block has one or more narrow notches 130 at its upper side within which the wire can be positioned, the widths of these notches being such that the wire will be resiliently held during the crimping operation. A similar block 132 of resilient material is mounted against the leg 106 of the yoke by the fastener 107. This block also has notches 134 on its upper side and the wire extending from the right in FIGURE 4 is positioned in one of these notches during the operating cycle.

It will be noted that since the block 132 is mounted on the leg 106, this block will be swung laterally with the die part 58 so that the block 132 will always be in alignment with the die part. The block 128, on the other hand, is secured directly to the die part 56 since the latter die part is not swung.

In use, the parts will be in the position shown in FIGURE 3 at the beginning of the operating cycle. The operator, while holding the tool with one hand, positions the wire extending from the right in FIGURE 4 in the notch 134 of block 132, leads the wire through the die cavity 60, and through one of the notches 117 of the plate 118 so that the end of the wire will extend in front of the die part 56. He then leads the other wire, extend ing from the left in FIGURE 4, through the notch 130, through the cavity of the die part 56, through one of the notches 117 of the plate 116 and positions the end of the wire behind the die part 58. FIGURE 8 shows the position of the wires after this threading operation has been accomplished.

It will be noted that arcuate recesses 148, (FIG- URE 7) respectively are provided on the front of the die part 56 and on the back side of the die part 58. The edges 140, 144 of these recesses move past the edges 142, 146 of the notches in the wire separator plates when the die part 58 is swung from the position of FIGURE 3 or 5 to the position of FIGURE 6. The movement of the die part between these positions and the movement of the edges identified above past each other has the effect of shearing the ends 12a, 14a of the wires in the plane of demarcation between the die ,parts. The arcuate recesses 148, 150 are provided to counteract the tendency of the Wires to be pushed upwardly when the die parts are brought into alignment with each other.

After completion of the shearing operation, the wires will then be almost abutting a common plane as shown in FIGURE 9 and will not extend past each other. The handles are then squeezed to drive the two die parts, now in axial alignment with each other, upwardly towards the anvil. The right-hand edges of the die parts engage the magazine 32 and swing it about its pivotal axis 38 away from the support surface 30. The die parts also engage the slidable plate 50 and move it upwardly during crimping as shown in FIGURE 7 although this plate is not moved out of the way until the uncrimped connector is gripped between the sidewalls of the die cavities 60.

The separator plates 116, 118 do not move upwardly by virtue of their enlarged base portions which project into the recess of the block means 66. The wires are thus carried upwardly, positioned between the sidewalls of the connector disposed on the anvil and the connector is crimped onto the wires.

In the disclosed embodiment of the invention, each wire is sheared by one edge of each separator plate in cooperation with one edge of one of the die blocks. It will be apparent that the separator plates are not essential to the practice of the invention and that they could be eliminated. If the separator plates were eliminated from the tool, the recesses 112, 114 would not be provided in the die parts so that the adjacent ends of the die recesses 60 would be contiguous. Under such circumstances, each wire would be sheared by an edge of the recess 60 in one die part in cooperation with one of the outside edges 140, 144. The separator plates are advantageous since they can be replaced and/or have their edges sharpened for more effective shearing. The primary purpose of these separator plates, as previously noted, is to maintain the separation of two wires extending from one side to the splice and to insure that one wire will be positioned in notches 6 of the tongues.

A salient advantage of the invention is that it avoids the necessity, when making a splice-type connection of inserting the wire ends into the connector and accurately positioning the ends within the connector after insertion. When a technician uses a tool in accordance with the instant invention, he need only lace the wires through the cavities of the die parts, an operation which can be accomplished in an extremely short time. Closure of the handles to make the final crimped connection can, of course, also be carried out in a brief time interval. A further advantage is that where a pair of communications wires, such as telephone conductors are being spliced in situ, the splice can be made with virtually no slack in the resulting conductor since the wires can be pulled tightly before the two die parts are moved into axial alignment.

The invention is not limited to a hand tool as shown but can be incorporated in a larger applicator of the type shown in the cospending application of Coey William Fritz et al., Ser. No. 454,105, now Patent No. 3,287,790.

Changes in construction will occur to those skilled in the art and various apparently different modifications and embodiments may be made without departing from the scope of the invention. The matter set forth in the foregoing description and accompanying drawings is offered by way of illustration only. The actual scope of the invention is intended to be defined in the following claims when viewed in their proper perspective against the prior art.

We claim:

LApparatus for trimming the ends of a pair of wires extending towards each other and crimping an electrical connector onto the trimmed ends, said apparatus comprising, a crimping anvil for supporting said connector, a crimping die, said die having a forming trough on the one side thereof which faces said anvil, said trough extending from one end of said die to the opposite end thereof and being operative to bend sidewall portions of said connector into crimped engagement with said wires, saiddie being divided in two sections along a plane extending transversely of the axis of said trough, said sections being normally in laterally offset relationship with the axis of the trough of one section extending parallel to, and beside, the axis of the trough of the other section and with the trough of each section being disposed laterally beyond an adjacent side of the other section, means for moving said sections from their non-aligned to their aligned positions whereby, wires disposed in said trough of each section with their ends extending beyond said plane are trimmed in said plane by shearing action of said adjacent sides and said troughs in cooperation with the edges of said troughs, and means for moving said sections relatively towards each other whereby said connector supported by said anvil is crimped onto the trimmed ends of said wires.

2. Apparatus for trimming the ends of wires extending towards each other and crimping an electrical connecting device onto the trimmed ends, said apparatus comprising, a crimping anvil and a crimping die, said die having a forming trough on the one side thereof which faces said anvil for bending sidewall portions of said connecting device into crimped engagement with said wires, said die being divided into two sections in a plane extending transversely of the axis of said trough, said sections normally being in parallel offset relationship with the trough portions of each section disposed laterally beyond an adjacent side of the other section whereby said wires can be positioned in said trough portions with their ends extending through said plane, means for moving said sections into axial alignment with each other thereby to trim said ends from said wires by the shearing action of the edges of said adjacent sides and the edges of said trough portions, and means for moving said die relatively towards said anvil whereby, a connecting device positioned between said die and anvil is crimped onto said trimmed wires.

3. Apparatus for trimming the ends of a pair of wires extending towards each other and crimping an electrical connector onto the trimmed ends, said apparatus comprising, a crimping anvil for supporting said connector, a two-part crimping die, the parts of said die having adjacent ends lying in a common medial plane, each die part having a trough-like die cavity on the side thereof which faces said anvil, sai-d parts of said die being normally non-aligned with the axes of said die cavities being in parallel offset relationship to each other, means for moving said die parts from their non-aligned positions to aligned positions, and means for thereafter moving said die parts in unison towards said anvil whereby, upon positioning a wire in each of said cavities with its end extending through said medial plane and upon moving said die parts to their aligned positions, the end portions of said wires are sheared in said medial plane, and upon subsequently moving said die parts towards said anvil, a connector supported by said anvil is crimped onto said wires.

4. A device as set forth in claim 3 wherein one of said die parts moves along an arcuate path between said aligned position and said non-aligned position.

5. A device as set forth in claim 3 wherein said die parts are mounted on a common pivotal axis, guide block means for guiding said die parts towards and away from said anvil, and a recess in said guide block means adjacent to one of said die parts to permit pivotal movement of said one die part between said non-aligned and said aligned positions.

6. Apparatus for trimming the ends of a pair of wires extending towards each other and electrically joining said wires to each other, said apparatus comprising: first and second wire joining members, said members. being movable relatively towards and away from each other along a predetermined path and being effective, upon relative movement towards each other to electrically join a pair of wires positioned between said members, said first member comprising two parts, said parts being disposed against each other in a common plane and being movable relative to each other from an offset position to an aligned position, means on said parts for retaining each of said wires on one of said parts with the ends of said wires extending through said pl-ane whereby, upon positioning said wires in said retaining means when said parts are offset and moving said parts into alignment, said wires are trimmed in said common plane, and upon subsequent movement of said members relatively towards each other, said wires are electrically joined.

7. Apparatus as set forth in claim 6 in which said first wire joining member comprises a crimping die and said second member comprises a crimping anvil whereby, a connector supported on said anvil is crirnped onto said wires upon movement of said die and anvil towards each other.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,549,838 4/1951 Miller 29212 X 2,915,929 12/1959 Demler 72400 3,029,670 4/1962 Over et a1. 72451 3,287,790 11/1966 Fritz et al. 2933.5 3,328,871 7/1967 Over 29203 THOMAS H. EAGER, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2549838 *Apr 3, 1947Apr 24, 1951Miller Frank RTool for splicing wires
US2915929 *Feb 20, 1957Dec 8, 1959Amp IncTool with lost motion linkage for crimping electrical connectors
US3029670 *Dec 3, 1959Apr 17, 1962Amp IncHand tool for crimping electrical connectors
US3287790 *May 7, 1965Nov 29, 1966Amp IncApparatus for making electrical splices
US3328871 *Jan 18, 1965Jul 4, 1967Amp IncCrimping tool
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3630068 *May 20, 1970Dec 28, 1971Floyd Edwin JrHigh compression for staking tool
US3636611 *Mar 26, 1969Jan 25, 1972Gen Staple CoApparatus for splicing wires
US3710610 *Jun 5, 1970Jan 16, 1973Bunker RamoWire terminal crimping tool
US3837211 *Jul 6, 1973Sep 24, 1974Amp IncMulti-stroke hand tool
US3861017 *Dec 3, 1973Jan 21, 1975Garfinkel JackStapling apparatus
US3911712 *Jul 11, 1974Oct 14, 1975Amp IncCrimping tool
US3949467 *Jun 26, 1975Apr 13, 1976Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanySolderless electrical connector element application method and apparatus
US3962901 *Jul 23, 1975Jun 15, 1976Amp IncorporatedElectrical connector tap assembly apparatus
US4288918 *Mar 26, 1979Sep 15, 1981Bunker Ramo CorporationMethod and apparatus for making a crimped, insulation-pierce electrical connection
US4558584 *Jan 16, 1985Dec 17, 1985Paul Brong Machine Works, Inc.Combination cable crimper and cutter
US4980962 *Mar 19, 1990Jan 1, 1991C.A. Weidmuller Gmbh & Co.Apparatus for applying terminals to electrical conductors
US5267464 *Dec 30, 1991Dec 7, 1993Cleland John GPipe ring crimping tool
US6155095 *Jun 29, 1999Dec 5, 2000Wezag Gmbh WerkzeugfabrikPliers including a pliers head and a positioning device
US6805169 *Sep 30, 2002Oct 19, 2004Tyco Electronic CorporationMethod and apparatus for wire splicing
US7503201Mar 22, 2006Mar 17, 2009Mil3, Inc.Two-stroke tool
US7644485 *Oct 31, 2005Jan 12, 2010Adc GmbhTool for connecting cable conductors
US7886570Feb 12, 2009Feb 15, 2011Mil3, Inc.Two-stroke tool
US8087138 *Feb 9, 2009Jan 3, 2012Nikhil GuptaBead crimping tool
US8161789Mar 20, 2009Apr 24, 2012Wezag Gmbh WerkzeugfabrikCrimping pliers comprising a locator
EP2107650A2 *Mar 18, 2009Oct 7, 2009Wezag GmbH WerkzeugfabrikPress clamp with a positioning device
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/566.4, 72/451, 29/33.5, 29/282, 72/331, 29/751, 72/409.14, 72/400
International ClassificationH01R43/042, H01R43/04
Cooperative ClassificationH01R43/0421
European ClassificationH01R43/042A