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Publication numberUS3393828 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 23, 1968
Filing dateDec 22, 1966
Priority dateMar 15, 1966
Publication numberUS 3393828 A, US 3393828A, US-A-3393828, US3393828 A, US3393828A
InventorsAtkinson William G
Original AssigneeSomerville Ind Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carton with resilient article retaining means
US 3393828 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 23, 1968 w. G. ATKINSON CARTON WITH RESILIENT ARTICLE RETAINING MEANS Filed Dec. 22, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. 30 WILLIAM G. ATKINSON ATTORNEYS y 3, 1968 w. e. ATKINSON 3,393,823

CARTON WITH RESILIENT ARTICLE RETAINING MEANS Filed Dec. 22, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 1 NVEiv '1 OR. WILLIAM G. ATKINSON ymwwz ATTORN EYS United States Patent 8 Claims. 61. 220-115 ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates to paperboard cartons for use in shipping bottles or cans or the like which are arranged in an erect side-by-side relationship. The carton has a compartment for receiving a plurality of bottles in intimate contact with one another withont the usual divider which is used to separate each bottle. According to the present invention there is provided a resilient secondary end Wall within the carton which is adjustable to vary the effective overall width of the primary compartment of the carton in accordance with the varying dimensions of the bottles or the like which are located within the primary compartment. The resilient end wall may be formed from an eX- tension of the known end wall panels or it may be formed integral with a central divider used to divide the carton into two primary compartments.

This invention relates to paperboard cartons.

In particular this invention relates to improved cartons for use in shipping and storing articles which have substantial dimensional variations.

Containers such as beer bottles are generally manufactured with a diametrical tolerance of +060, .030 inch. Thus when the bottles are grouped together in a group of six in line, the maximum overall dimetrical variation is .360 inch.

Paperboard cartons are generally manufactured to accommodate the maximum possible dimensions of the bottles and consequently there are occasions when there can be as much as .OOY inch difference in the overall inner dimensions of the carton and the overall minimum dimensions of the bottles. Where cartons are formed with an individual compartment for each bottle the variation in dimensions between the carton and the bottles does not present any great problem. However, the lowering of bottles into multi-compartmental cartons has for some time been a major source of difficulty in the bottle industry, as the bottles are generally dropped into place and this frequently causes breakage of the bottles. With this in mind there has been a move to cartons which do not have separate compartments for each bottle and which can, therefore, be end loaded without the need to drop the bottles into place. The use of cartons which do not have individual compartments reduces the likelihood of breakage during the loading of the cartons, but due to the possible variation between the dimensions of the carton and the overall dimensions of the bottles, breakage can occur during the shipping of the bottles as a result of movement of the bottles within the carton.

It has been found that the disadvantages of the prior art discussed above can be overcome by providing, in a carton having a top wall, a bottom wall, a pair of opposed side walls, and a pair of opposed end walls defining a primary compartment, the improvement of at least one resiliently adjustable secondary end wall within the primary compartment adapted to vary the effective overall width of the compartment between the end walls.

It is an object of this invention to provide an improved carton for containers and the like which have substantial dimensional tolerances.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a variable sized compartment within a carton.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide a resiliently adjustable secondary end wall within the inner compartment of a carton.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a divider panel for dividing a compartment into at least two secondary compartments and variable adjustable secondary end walls within each secondary compartment to vary the effective overall width of the compartment between the end walls.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide a carton divider having at least two pairs of secondary end walls carried thereby.

The invention will be more clearly understood after reference to the following detailed specification read in conjunction with the drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a pictorial view of a closed end loading carton according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 2 is a pictorial view of a divider panel assembly according to an embodiment of the invention.

FIGURE 3 is a partial plan view of the divider panel assembly of FIGURE 2 taken in the direction of the arrows 33.

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view of the divider of FIG- URE 2 taken in the direction of the arrows 44.

FIGURE 5 is a sectional plan view of the carton of FIGURE 1 taken in the direction of the arrows 5-5.

FIGURE 6 is a view similar to FIGURE 5 showing an alternative arrangement of containers within the carton.

FIGURE 7 is an exploded perspective view of a further embodiment of the present invention.

FIGURE 8 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the invention, and

FIGURE 9 is a partial view of yet another embodiment of the invention.

In the embodiment illustrated in the drawings the carton 10 is formed with a top wall 12, a bottom wall 14, a pair of opposed side walls 16 and a pair of opposed end walls 18 which taken together define a compartment 20. The end walls 18 are formed by co-operating flaps 18a, 18b, 18c and 18d which fold upon one another to close the carton.

In FIGURE 2 of the drawings, the reference numeral 22 refers generally to a divider assembly for use in the carton illustrated in FIGURE 1. The assembly includes a central longitudinally extending divider panel 24 which is formed with a reinforced handle element 26 and a reinforced upper edge 28. A pair of secondary end walls 30 and 30a extend outwardly from opposite ends of the central panel 24 in one direction and a pair of secondary end walls 32 and 32a extend outwardly from the central panel 24 in the opposite direction to define, in combination with the central panel 24 and the carton 10, a pair of article embracing primary compartments 46 and 48 which are adapted to embrace a plurality of bottles or cans 44 in erect side-by-side intimate contact with one another.

FIGURE 3 of the drawings illustrates the manner in which the secondary end walls 30 and 32 are connected to the panel 24. In the embodiment of the invention illustrated the divider assembly 22 is formed from a unitary blank which is cut and scored in order to be foldable to the form illustrated in FIGURES 2, 3 and 4. An important feature of the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGURE 3 lies in the fact that the secondary walls 30 and 32 may be deflected in the direction of the arrows 34 and 36 to enlarge the capacity of the compartment defined by opposed secondary walls as will be described hereinafter.

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 4-4 of FIGURE 2 showing the manner in which the blank is folded in order to provide a reinforced handle portion 25. The same folding of the blank provides a reinforced upper edge 28.

The divider assembly 22 fits within the carton and the top wall 12 of the carton is provided with a longitudinal slot 36 through which the manually engageable handle passes. The divider assembly 22 is free to move vertically within the carton in order that it may be raised or lowered to cause the handle to project through the slot 36 or to cause the handle to underlie the top wall 12. When the handle is in the raised position the reinforced edge 28 of the longitudinal panel and the top edges 38 and of the secondary end walls react against the inner surface of the top wall 12 to permit the carton to be carried by the handle.

Referring now to FIGURE 5 of the drawings it will be seen that the divider asembly 22 fits within the carton 10 to provide a pair of secondary compartments 46 and 48. In FIGURE 5 of the drawings the carton is shown containing bottles 44 which all have the minimum permissible external diameter measurements and consequently the overall dimension X is a minimum for the class of bottle in use. The face-to-face dimension between the opposed walls 30, 30a and 32, 32a is never greater than the dimension X when the divider is in an unstressed position. It will be noted that the internal end-to-end dimensions of the carton are greater than the external endto-end dimensions of the divider assembly such that there may be a gap 42 at each end of the carton.

Turning now to FIGURE 6 of the drawings wherein a carton is shown to be loaded with bottles having the maximum permitta'nle external diameter for the particular class of bottle in use. In this illustration the dimension Y is equal to the sum total of the external diameters of the bottles arranged within the secondary compartments and the dimension illustrated at X is equal to the minimum external dimension as discussed with reference to FIGURE 5. It will be noted that in order to accommodate the greater width the secondary end walls are forced outwardly into the gaps 42.

From the aforegoing it will be apparent that the bottles are embraced by the secondary end walls 30, 30a, 32, 32a in a close fitting relationship.

In the embodiment of the invention illustrated in F IG- URE 7 the secondary end Walls 30, 30a, 32, 32a are formed as an integral part of the carton rather than as an integral part of the divider assembly as previously described with reference to the aforegoing drawings. It Will be readily apparent that when the divider panel 22a is located in a position to divide the carton 10a into two substantially equal compartments the secondary end walls 30b, 30c and 32b, 320 will act in substantially the same manner as the walls 30, 30a, and 32, 32a previously described. The gap 42a is provided by forming the secondary end walls as an integral part of the end panels 18a and 18b and providing longitudinal extensions 18f connecting the secondary end walls with the primary end walls.

A still further embodiment of the invention is illus trated in FIGURE 8 wherein a carton of the type which is provided with a single compartment is illustrated. In this type of carton a divider is not required. A secondary end -wall 30d is provided in the compartment to accommodate the variations in diameter of the containers as previously described. The secondary end wall 30d is formed integral with the end wall 18 and is connected thereto by means of a longitudinally extending extension 18g.

Another embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGURE 9 wherein secondary end walls 30 and 32f are in the form of substantially Z-shaped inserts which are adhesively connected to the end wall panels 18a and 18b. Again the secondary end walls 30 and 32 are adjustable to accommodate the variations in diameter of the articles to be contained within the carton.

The broad principle of the present invention is best iillustrated in FIGURES 5 and 6. In FIGURES 5 and 6 it will be seen that the articles to be contained within the carton are always maintained in intimate contact with one another by the embracing efliect of the secondary end walls on the outermost articles of each group. It will be apparent that if the face-to-face distance between the secondary end walls in their relaxed position is never greater than the dimension X then the secondary end Walls will embrace the containers within the carton over the entire range of overall widths of the articles. It has been found that the inherent resilience of paperboard is sufiicient to enable the secondary end walls to be deflected outwardly while still maintaining an embracing grip on the articles of larger diameter.

Various modifications of the embodiments of the invention illustrated in the drawings will be apparent to those skilled in the art of packaging. In particular it would be with the scope of the present invention to adapt the divider assembly for use with articles having a generally square cross-section. This could be done by extending the length of the divider panel 24 and causing the secondary end wall to be initially toed inwardly when in a relaxed position.

What I claim is:

1. In a carton having a top wall, a bottom wall, a pair of opposed side walls and a pair of opposed end walls defining a primary compartment adapted to receive a plurality of bottles or cans or the like in erect side-by-side intimate contact with one another, the improvement of a resiliently adjustable secondary end wall within said primary compartment at or adjacent at least one of said opposed end walls adapted to vary the effect overall width of said compartment between said end walls.

2. In a carton having a top wall, a bottom wall, a pair of opposed side walls and a pair of opposed end Walls, at least one divider panel extending between said end walls to define a pair of primary compartments adapted to receive a plurality of bottles, cans or the like in erect sideby-side intimate contact with one another, the improvement of a resiliently adjustable secondary end wall within each of said primary compartments at or adjacent at least one of said opposed end walls of each primary compartment, said resiliently adjustable secondary end wall being adjustable to vary the elfective overall width of said primary compartments between said end walls.

3. In a carton having a top wall, a bottom wall, a pair of opposed side walls and a pair of opposed end walls, at least one divider panel extending between said end walls to define a pair of compartments, the improvement of one pair of opposed resiliently adjustable secondary end walls extending into each of said compartments adjacent each of said opposed end walls, one secondary wall of each pair of walls being carried by opposite ends of said divider to define bottle embracing compartments therebetween adapted to embrace a plurality of bottles or the like in erect side-by-side intimate contact with one another, said opposed resiliently adjustable end walls being adjustable to vary the effective overall width of said article embracing compartments.

4. In a carton as claimed in claim 1 the improvement of securing said resiliently adjustable secondary end walls to an end wall of said primary compartment.

5. In a carton as claimed in claim 2 the improvement of forming said resiliently adjustable secondary end walls integral with an end wall of said primary compartment.

6. In a carton as claimed in claim 3 the improvement of forming said secondary end walls integral with said divider panel.

7. In a carton as claimed in claim 3, the improvement wherein each secondary wall is initially spaced from its opposed secondary wall a distance not greater than the minimum overall extent of the articles to be located within said primary compartment.

8. In a carton having a top wall, a bottom Wall, a pair of opposed side walls and a pair of opposed end walls, the improvement of a handle member comprising a divider panel extending between said end Walls to define a pair of compartments, a pair of opposed resiliently adjustable secondary end walls formed integral with said divider panel and extending into each of said compartments, one secondary wall of each pair of walls being carried by opposite ends of said divided to define bottle embracing compartments therebetween, said opposed resiliently adjustable walls being adjustable to vary the effective overall width of said article elmracing compartments adapted to embrace a plurality of bottles or the like in erect side-by-side intimate contact With one an- References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,990,675 2/ 1935 Sinz et al. 206-65 2,012,132 8/1935 Koppelman et al. 229-15 2,296,389 9/ 1942 Leu-koff 229-27 2,748,978 6/ 1956 Hennessey et al. 229-15 2,830,727 4/ 1958 Stoel 220-115 3,034,682 5/ 1962 Curran.

FOREIGN PATENTS 932,714 12/ 1947 France.

DAVIS T. MOORHEAD, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1990675 *Nov 23, 1932Feb 12, 1935Barbee Cecil RPacking tray
US2012132 *Feb 6, 1931Aug 20, 1935Holed Tite Packing CorpShipping container
US2296389 *Feb 15, 1940Sep 22, 1942David LevkoffCardboard box
US2748978 *Feb 21, 1951Jun 5, 1956Waldorf Paper Prod CoBottle carriers
US2830727 *Nov 22, 1954Apr 15, 1958American Box Board CoBottle and like carrier
US3034682 *Oct 17, 1960May 15, 1962Unipak Cartons LtdCarrier carton
FR932714A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4512511 *Nov 30, 1983Apr 23, 1985Somerville Belkin Industries LimitedDivided display container
US4986416 *May 5, 1988Jan 22, 1991Arthurs Raymond CBag bottle carrier
US7331466Sep 26, 2005Feb 19, 2008Honda Motor Co., Ltd.Packaging material having a cam lock
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/200, 229/120.38, 229/117.22, 229/117.24, 229/122
International ClassificationB65D77/04, B65D5/465, B65D5/46, B65D5/50
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/46064, B65D77/0426, B65D5/5021
European ClassificationB65D5/46A6, B65D5/50B, B65D77/04C2