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Publication numberUS3393912 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 23, 1968
Filing dateSep 1, 1965
Priority dateSep 1, 1965
Publication numberUS 3393912 A, US 3393912A, US-A-3393912, US3393912 A, US3393912A
InventorsDe Lonais Melvin D
Original AssigneeMelvin D. De Lonais
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hunting arrow with hollow shaft
US 3393912 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 23, 1968 M. D. DE LQNAIS HUNTING ARROW WITH HOLLOW SHAFT Filed Sept. 1, 1965 United States Patent 3,393,912 HUNTING ARROW WITH HOLLOW SHAFT Melvin D. De Lonais, Box 410, Warren, Ureg. 97053 Filed Sept. 1, 1965, Ser. No. 484,302 6 Claims. (Cl. 273--106.5)

ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A game hunting arrow that is of an easy-to-trail construction. The elongated shaft is imperforate and hollow. The hollow portion provides a blood flow-through passage. Game penetrating means is mounted on and carried by the leading end and characterized by a conventional pointed and bladed broadhead and with means connecting the broadhead to the open leading end and ported to provide blood inlet means communicating with the leading end of the passage. Similar bored and ported means is mounted on and carried by the trailing end and serves as a mounting and connector for a suitably designed nock.

This invention relates to a hunting arrow which is uniquely distinct and different from commonly used arrows in that it is provided with novel self-contained mechanical means which make it possible for the hunter to trail the flight of the arrow and subsequently run down and land the game hit by the arrow.

Persons conversant with the art to which the invention relates are aware that the idea of constructing an easy-to-trail or self-locating hunting arrow is not new. One example of what has been offered by others is disclosed in the patent issued to Cohen 2,554,012. This paent reveals a wild game hunting arrow characterized by a hollow shaft having a broadhead at its forward end with its rear end closed. An enlarged blood intake or entrance opening is formed in the shaft proximal to the broadhead. A discharge opening is formed in the shaft rearward from the entrance opening and manually regulable means is employed to control the functioning size of the entrance opening. It will also be noted that the hollow shaft in Cohens patent is perforated.

The general object of the present invention is to improve upon prior art hunting arrows with self-contained and self-locating features. For instance, instead of using a perforated shaft an imperforate shaft is utilized. In fact, and to the ends desired the present invention is characterized by an elongated hollow shaft which is imperforate. The hollow portion of the shaft provides a blood flow-through passage, said passage being open at its leading and trailing ends. Novel game-penetrating means is mounted on and carried by the leading end of the shaft and is unique in that it is provided with blood inlet means communicating with the leading end of the passage. Then, too, equally novel means is mounted on and carried by the trailing end of the shaft and this last-named means is provided with discharge means communicating with the trailing end of the passage.

More specifically, the game-penetrating means at the forward or leading end comprises a head whose forward end is conically formed and thus suitably pointed, the rearward body portion being provided with a reduced shouldered shank which is fitted telescopingly and plugged and fixedly oriented with the open leading end of the flow-through passage. This head is provided with communicating ports which open through adjacent peripheral surfaces of the head. More explicitly, the 'head is equipped with a plurality of ports whose axes are disposed at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the bore and these ports are circumferentially spaced apart to ensure eflicient entrance of the blood from the body of the game which has been hit.

Further, the means which is utilized at the rearward end comprises a similar conical head which is also provided at its forward end with a reduced shouldered shank which is telescopingly plugged into the coacting rearward open end of the passage in the shaft. This conical head is likewise provided with an. axial bore and has communicating orifices defining exit ports which open through the peripheral surfaces of the conical head to satisfactorily achieve the desired tracing result and to permit the over-all arrow to well serve the easy-to-trail result desired.

The invention also features plastic or equivalent foreand-aft attachments, namely, a broadhead which is provided with a socket-like sheath which can be fitted over the pointed end of the penetrating head and adhesively or otherwise secured thereto. The remaining attachment which constitutes the desired nock is preferably of plastic material and has an adapter socket which telescopingly receives the conical terminal portion of the rearward head which is adhesively or otherwise aptly attached thereto.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a view which shows, primarily in section, the shaft with ported heads attached to the leading and trailing ends, the mock being attached to the rearward end, the broadhead at the front being omitted.

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1 which shows the complete ready-to-use hunting arrow.

FIG. 3 is a detailed section taken on the plane of the section line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

And FIG. 4 is a cross-section taken on the plane of the section line 4-4 of FIG. 2.

Referring now to the views of the drawings, it will be seen that the elongated straight cylindrical hollow shaft is denoted by the numeral 6. In practice the shaft has been made of aluminum or fiberglass but obviously may he made of other suitable lightweight material. The hollow portion 8 constitutes and provides the flow-through main blood-trapping passage. The rearward open end, the trailing end, is denoted at 10 and is provided with feathered or equivalent fletching 12. The attachment means at this end 12 is denoted generally by the numeral 14. The forward open. end portion is denoted at 16 and is adapted for mounting thereon of the game-penetrating means denoted generally at 18. This means comprises a cylindrical body portion 20 having a conical pointed end 22. The attachable or rearward end of this pointed body is provided with a reduced neck or shank 24 which is telescopingly plugged into the end portion 16 and appropriately secured in place. An axial bore 26 is provided and is closed at the forward end and open at the rearward end where it communicates with. the passage 8. This bored portion of the body is also provided with forward diametrically opposite orifices or ports 28 and a pair of circumferentially spaced rearwardly positioned orifices or .ports 30, the thus paired ports being at right angles to each other and consequently circumferentially spaced and opening through the peripheral surface of the body. These ports 28 and 30 and bore 26 provide the desired blood inlet or intake means.

The trailing attachment or head is also provided with a cylindrical body portion 32 having a reduced neck or shank 34 telescoping into and secured to the end portion 10. The pointed reanward head is denoted at 36. The axial bore is denoted at 38 and communicates with the discharge end of the passage 8 and is provided with a pair of diametrically opposite right angularly disposed discharge ports 40. The neck is telescopingly fitted in the end portion 10 in any suitably retained manner.

It will be evident that the readily attachable inserts or attachments constituting the penetrating head 18 and discharge head 14 coordinate with each other and orient the orifices relative to the flow-through passage 8 in a manner to satisfactorily accomplish the flow of blood through the shaft and in this manner to leave an easy-to-trail path of blood and to minimize the likelihood of losing the penetrate-d game. Secondly, attachments such as those shown and described give the hollow shaft the weight necessary to comply with hunting regulations. As is known, hunting arrows must be of a specified weight to achieve the maximum penetration. In addition, it will be noted that with the head 18 constructed as shown and described it lends itself to the use thereon of a broadhead 42 as shown in FIG. 2. It follows that the hunter can use any type broadhead he may desire and still benefit from the cooperating ported blood inlet head 18. The blade portion of the broadhead is denoted at 44 and the conical socket portion is denoted at 46. This socketed portion is fitted over the nose or point 22 and is adhesively secured thereto as at 48.

A simple attachment type plastic nock is provided as at 50 and it has a socketed body portion 52 which is designed and adapted to telescopingly receive the conical terminal head 36. The attachment 50 in this instance is preferably made from a suitable grade of plastic material and the socketed portion 52 is adhesively attached as at 54. The furcations are conventional and denoted at 56 and 58, respectively.

It is submitted that the hunting arrow herein shown and described is expressly designed and adapted for effective bleeding of big game. It functions, when a proper strike is made, to enable the hunter to pick-up the blood trail and effectually locate the victim. Accordingly, it well serves the purposes for which it is intended.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. An easy-to-trail game hunting arrow of a type and prescribed weight capable of being propelled comprising a straight elongated hollow imperforate rigid shaft, the hollow portion of said shaft providing a blood flowthrough passage and being open at its leading and trailing ends, game-penetrating means mounted on and carried by the leading end of said shaft and provided with blood inlet means communicating with the leading end of said passage, and means mounted on and carried by the trailing end and having discharge means communicating with the trailing end of said passage, said game-penetrating means comprising a rigid head having its forward impaling end pointed and its rearward end provided with a shouldered shank plugged into the oriented opening leading end of said flow-through passage, said inlet means comprising a reduced axial bore provided with a plurality of communicating blood inlet ports opening through adjacent peripheral surfaces of said head, said ports having axes disposed at right angles to the longitudinal axis of said bore, and said ports being circumferentially spaced apart, there being at least two diametrically opposite forward ports and at least two diametrically opposite rearward ports and all of said ports being positioned forwardly of the leading end of said shaft.

2. The arrow defined in claim 1, and wherein the means mounted on said rearward end comprises a rigid conical head provided at its forward end with a reduced shouldered shank which is telescopically plugged into the coacting rearward open end of said flow-through shaft, the discharge means comprising an axial bore having communicating orifices defining exit ports, the latter opening through oriented peripheral surfaces of said conical head.

3. An easy-to-trail game hunting arrow adapted to be propelled and comprising a straight elongated hollow but imperforate shaft, the hollow portion of said shaft providing a blood flow-through passage said shaft being open at its leading and trailing ends, game-penetrating means mounted on and carried by the leading end and provided with blood inlet means communicating with the leading end of said passage, and means mounted on and carried by the trailing end and having discharge means communicating with the trailing end of said passage, said game-penetrating means comprising a rigid impaling head having its forward end pointed and its rearward end provided with a shouldered shank telescopingly plugged into the oriented open leading end of said flow-through passage, said inlet means comprising a constantly open axial bore provided with communicating blood inlet ports opening through adjacent peripheral surfaces of said head, the means mounted on said rearward end comprising a rigid conical head provided at its forward end with a reduced shouldered shank telescopingly plugged into the coacting rearward open end of said flow-through shaft, the discharge means comprising an axial bore having communicating orifices defining blood exit ports opening through oriented peripheral surfaces of said conical head.

4. An easy-to-trail hunting arrow comprising a linearly straight elongated hollow but imperforate shaft, the hollow portion of said shaft providing a blood flowthrough passage and being open at its leading and trailing end, game-penetrating means mounted on and carried by the leading end and provided with blood inlet means communicating with the leading end of said passage, and means mounted on and carried by the trailing end and having discharge means communicating with the trailing end of said passage, said game-penetrating means comprising a head having its forward end pointed and its rearward end provided with a shouldered shank telescopingly plugged into the oriented open leading end of said flow-through passage, said inlet means comprising an axial bore provided with communicating ports opening through adjacent peripheral surfaces of said head, the means mounted on said rearward end comprising a conical head provided at its forward end with a reduced shouldered shank telescopingly plugged into the coacting rearward open end of said flow-through shaft, the discharge means comprising an axial bore having communicating orifices defining blood exit ports, the latter opening through oriented peripheral surfaces of said conical head, and, in combination, an attachable broadhead having an axial socket sheathed and fitted over and aifixed to and carried by said first-named head.

5. The structure defined in claim 4, and a readily attachable nock having a body portion with a conical forwardly opening socket mated for reception and retention of said conical head, and said conical head being telescopingly fitted and adhesively secured in said socket.

6. A game hunting arrow of the type and prescribed weight capable of being propelled comprising a straight elongated hollow rigid and imperforate shaft, the hollow portion of said shaft providing a blood flow-through and means mounted on and carried by the trailing end game-penetrating means mounted on and carried by the leading end of said shaft and provided with blood inlet means communicating the leading end of said passage, and means mounted o nand carried by the trailing end and having blood discharge means communicating with the trailing end of said passage, a pointed bladed broad- 5 6 head having an axial socket, said penetrating means em- References Cited bodying a head portion fitted into and secured in said UNITED STATES PATENTS socket, and a nock operatively mounted on a coasting part of the means carried by said trailing end, said shaft, 3,216,727 11/1965 Hunter 273-1055 X both of said means, said broadhead and complemented 5 v nock being of prescribed aggregate and permissible RICHARD CPINKHAMP'lmary Examme" Weight that the over-all arrow can be properly propelled. P. E. SHAPIRO, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3216727 *May 14, 1962Nov 9, 1965Hunter Howard BruceGame baton
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3617060 *Apr 10, 1967Nov 2, 1971Iezzi WarrenPneumothorox-inducing hunting arrow
US3993311 *May 3, 1976Nov 23, 1976William JohnsonCompress arrow
US4021041 *Sep 12, 1975May 3, 1977Adolph E. GoldfarbThrow and catch toy
US4166619 *Mar 3, 1977Sep 4, 1979Bergmann Bruce ASequential function hunting arrows
US4212463 *Feb 17, 1978Jul 15, 1980Pratt Enoch BHumane bleeder arrow
US5067731 *May 25, 1990Nov 26, 1991Bickel Wayne JNock adapter
US5417439 *Nov 20, 1991May 23, 1995Bickel; Wayne J.Nock adapter
US5921875 *Jun 4, 1997Jul 13, 1999Bickel; Wayne J.Reduced weight arrow point adapter having high density groove structure
US6186913May 17, 2000Feb 13, 2001Ronald L. ThomasHunting arrow and method
US6238310May 11, 2000May 29, 2001Timothy Jon MorrisonTracker arrow
US6705808Dec 12, 2002Mar 16, 2004William R. KaneBig game tracking arrow and apparatus for the manufacture thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/581
International ClassificationF42B12/36, F42B12/02, F42B6/00, F42B6/04
Cooperative ClassificationF42B6/04, F42B12/362
European ClassificationF42B6/04, F42B12/36B