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Publication numberUS3394473 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 30, 1968
Filing dateOct 6, 1966
Priority dateSep 6, 1966
Also published asDE1685702A1
Publication numberUS 3394473 A, US 3394473A, US-A-3394473, US3394473 A, US3394473A
InventorsBruno Romen
Original AssigneeBruno Romen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe having shape-retaining means
US 3394473 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July so, 1968 B. ROMEN 3,394,473

SHOE HAVING SHAPE-RETAINING MEANS Filed Oct. 6. 1966 INVENT OR Bruno Homer:

AH-urheYs 3,394,473 SHOE HAVING SHAPE-RETAINING MEANS Bruno Romen, Guaitastrasse 12, Kronberg, Germany Filed Oct. 6, 1966, Ser. No. 584,733 Claims priority, application Germany, Sept. 6, i966,

, Claims. 7 a. 36 -2.5)

with the rear sole portion, whichis drawniforward ap proximately to the shank area. Attached to the supporting structure is an insole, independently formed of pressed fiber material, which extends the entire length of the shoe so that a part thereof projects from the supporting struc-' ture to the tip of the shoe and forms a flexible sole for the shoe. The shoe finally includes a heel, attached to the supporting. structure, andupper material covering the outer sideof the supporting structure. p

The present invention relates to the construction and manufacture of shoes. and particularly ladies shoes with heels and a shape-retaining frame work which consists of a molded piece of plastic which is provided with a rigidv insole part extending between the heel and ball areas of the shoe and of a counter which is integrally connected to the rigid insole part and is drawn forwardly approximately to "the shank area of the shoe. The outer side of the framework is covered by the material of the upper of the shoe.-

.The framework of such a shoe which may be produced in a simple manner, for example, by molding or diecasting not only forms the, shape-retaining support of the shoe, butit. also serves as a shape-retaining base: for the leather upper. The operation of shaping the rear part of the upper on a heel forming machine which was previously required therefore become-s unnecessary. This not only results in a considerable simplification of the manufacture of such shoes and a reduction of its costs, but it also permits the use of thinner leather of a lower quality without requiring the use of an intermediate lining within the shoe. Since the molded framework of plastic for such a shoe may in each case be made accurately in accordance with the shape of a last, the entire shoe may be made to fit much more accurately than one in'which the material of the upper, for example, leather, forms the shape-producing element.

It is an object of the present invention to improve a shoe of the type as above described so as to permit it despite its perfect-shape-retaining properties to be adapted to any particular shape of a foot, and, in general, to improve the qualityvof such a shoe both insofar as its appearance and its practical value in actual use are concerned.

According to the invention, this object is attained by combining the rigid insole part ofthe framework with a counter which is provided with flexible and elastic side walls. The elasticity of the counter insures that the rear part of the upper will properly retain its shape and that the shoe will adapt itself very accurately to the particular shape of the part of a foot between the heel and shank. The elastic counter of the otherwise rigid framework therefore results in a very accurate and lasting fit of the shoe. The framework is preferably made of an elastic plastic, for example, nylon, and for stabilizing the framework in longitudinal direction, the lower side of its rigid insole part is provided with one or more reinforcing ridges. For ladies shoes with high heels it may beadvis a'ble toprovidean additional arch support by embedding a strip of spring steel in the rigid insole part or in a reinforcing ridge thereon.

In the manufacture of the framework it is.also possible to provide it,with additional reinforcements which may be molded on the framework wherever theymay be advisable-for orthopedic or other reasons. Thus, for

example, a padl ike bulge may be molded upon the upper side of the rigid insole part at theinner side of the shank for lifting the arch. The disadvantage that especially in ladies shoes the upper often becomes deformed in the course of time at the inner side of the shank may be prevented in a shoe according to the invention by making the forwardly-driven counter of a greater solidity than the other parts of the framework. 7

The features and advantages of the present invention will become more clearly apparent from the following detailed description thereof which is to be read with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 shows a perspective view of the framework of a shoe according to the invention;

FIGURE 2 shows a cross section which is taken along i the line IIII of FIGURE 1; while FIGURE 3 shows a perspective view of the finished shoe which is provided with a framework according to FIGURES l and 2 .and from which a part is cut away to illustrate the structure of the upper.

As illustrated in the drawings, the shoe according to the invention comprises a frame-work which is molded of plastic and substantially consists of an elastic counter 1 which is drawn forwardly approximately to the shank area of the shoe, and a rigid insole part 2, the lower side of which is provided with a reinforcing ridge 2' and on the heel area of the latter with a downwardly extending projection 2" of an angular shape. In the finished shoe, this projection 2" engages tightly into a corresponding recess in the upper side of the heel 3 for the purpose of centering the heel and of preventing it from being twisted relative to the insole part 2. This projection 2" as well as the reinforcing ridge 2' are molded or die-cast integrally with the remainder of the framework.

The framework is further strengthened especially in its longitudinal direction by a strip 4 of spring steel which is embedded in the rigid insole part 2.

The reinforcing ridge 2 is preferably designed so that its lower surface terminates in alignment with the lasting margin of the upper 5 which in the finished shoe covers the outer side of the framework. In this event there is no need to fill out the area which is enclosed by the lasting margin.

In order to prevent the rigid construction of the insole part 2 of the framework from interfering with the natural rolling motion of the foot in walking, it extends into a further insole part of a flexible material which may consist, for example, of a layer of compressed leather fibers. In the particular embodiment of the shoe as illustrated in the drawings, this insole part is formed by an extension 6' of a solid covering 6 which is provided on the upper side of the rigid insole part 2 and preferably consists of a moisture-absorbent material, for example, a layer of compressed leather fibers.

In the inner side of the finished shoe as shown in FIG- URE 3, the counter 1 is covered by a lining 7.

Although my invention has been illustrated and described with reference to the preferred embodiment thereof, I wish to have it understood that it is in no way limited to the details of such embodiment but is capable of numerous modifications within the scope of the appended claims.

Patented July 30, 1968 Having thus fully disclosed my invention, What I claim is:

1. In a shoe construction, in combination, a shape-retaining supporting structure molded of an elastic plastic material and comprising a substantially rigid rear insole portion extending from the heel area substantially to the ball area of the shoe, a counter having elastic side walls which is integral with said rear insole portion and drawn forwardly substantially to the shank area of the shoe and at least one reinforcing ridge on the lower side of said rigid insole portion for stabilizing said supporting structure in its longitudinal direction; a heel secured to said rigid insole portion; and upper material covering the outer side of said supporting structure.

2. A shoe construction as defined in claim 1, further comprising a strip of spring steel embedded in said rigid insole portion.

3. A shoe construction as defined in claim 1, in which the lower surface of said reinforcing ridge terminates flush with the lasting margin of said upper material.

4. A shoe construction as defined in claim 1, in which said counter has a greater solidity at the inner side of said shank area than at the other parts thereof.

5. A shoe construction as defined in claim 1, further comprising a front insole portion consisting of a flexible material secured to the front end of said rigid insole portion.

6. A shoe construction as defined in claim 1, further comprising a layer of moisture-absorbing material covering the upper side of said rigid insole portion.

7. A shoe construction as defined in claim 6, in which said layer is substantially shape-retaining and also extends forwardly beyond said rigid insole portion so as to form the front portion of the insole.

8. A shoe construction as defined in claim 1, in which said heel is provided with a recess of an angular shape in its upper side, said rigid insole portion having a projection integral with its lower side and having a shape substantally corresponding to the shape of said recess and projecting into and secured to the walls of said recess.

9. A shoe comprising, in combination:

(a) a shape-retaining supporting structure molded of a plastic material, said structure having a substantially rigid sole portion extending from the heel area substantially to the ball area of the shoe and a counter, integral with said rear sole portion, which is drawn forward approximately to the shank area of the shoe;

(b) an insole, independently formed of pressed fiber material and attached to said supporting structure, said insole extending the entire length of the shoe so that a part thereof projects from said supporting structure to the tip of the shoe and forms a flexible sole for the shoe;

(0) a heel attached to said supporting structure; and

(d) upper material covering the outer side of said supporting structure.

10. The shoe defined in claim 9 wherein said shoe is a ladies shoe.

References Eited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,403,442 7/1946 Klaus 3668 X 3,068,872 12/1962 Brody 128595 3,091,872 6/1963 Baumann et al 3676 3,120,710 2/1964 Romen 3668 X 3,333,353 8/1967 Garcia 36-76 PATRICK D. LAWSON, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2403442 *Jan 1, 1945Jul 9, 1946Calvin C KlausShoe
US3068872 *Aug 11, 1959Dec 18, 1962Elliot Brody AlecFoot supporting device
US3091872 *Jul 11, 1960Jun 4, 1963Bally S Shoe Factories LtdShank and heel seat member for footwear
US3120710 *Oct 7, 1959Feb 11, 1964Ariston Schuhfabrik Romen G MShoe construction with molded rigid rear sole part
US3333353 *Jul 10, 1964Aug 1, 1967Arnau Garcia PedroManufacture of footwear
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4320588 *Aug 2, 1979Mar 23, 1982Giulio SottolanaInsole, in particular for ladies' shoes
US5179791 *Aug 19, 1991Jan 19, 1993Lain Cheng KTorsional spring insole and method
US5855079 *Dec 19, 1995Jan 5, 1999Nina MelingMulti-skinned boots
US6079128 *Sep 1, 1997Jun 27, 2000Bauer Nike Hockey Inc.Skate boot construction with integral plastic insert
US7401422 *Apr 28, 2000Jul 22, 2008Adidas International Marketing B.V.Plate for running shoe
US8671590 *Mar 30, 2007Mar 18, 2014Nelwood CorporationShoe stability layer apparatus and method
US20090031584 *Mar 30, 2007Feb 5, 2009Rasmussen Bret SShoe Stability Layer Apparatus And Method
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/88, 36/68, 36/154
International ClassificationA43B13/41, A43B23/00, A43B23/22, A43B13/38, A43B23/17
Cooperative ClassificationA43B23/22, A43B13/41, A43B23/17
European ClassificationA43B23/17, A43B23/22, A43B13/41