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Publication numberUS3394491 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 30, 1968
Filing dateJul 9, 1965
Priority dateJul 9, 1965
Publication numberUS 3394491 A, US 3394491A, US-A-3394491, US3394491 A, US3394491A
InventorsJames Valentine Amedee
Original AssigneeRonald Stein, Sanford Astor
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Simulated sounding space weapon toy
US 3394491 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 30, 1968 A. J. VALENTINE 3,394,491

SIMULATED SOUNDING SPACE WEAPON TOY Filed July 9, 1965 FIG. 3

INVENTOR. AMEDEE JAMES VALENTINE Cut ATTORNEY United States Patent SIMULATED SOUNDlNG SPACE WEAPON TOY Am edee James Valentine, North Hollywood, Calil:'., as-

SlgllOl of twenty-five percent to Ronald Stein, and

twenty-five percent to Sanford Astor, both of Northridge, Calif.

Filed July 9, 1965, Ser. No. 470,671 Claims. (Cl. 46-227) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention comprises a sound producing childs toy in the shape of a space weapon or a space ship. It is battery operated and by means of an external switch depressed by the child a note of fixed frequency is impressed upon a transistor. Rotation of a knob by the child controls a potentiometer which changes the pitch of the sound produced. Manipulation of the switch and knob allows variation in the sound produced by the toy.

This invention relates generally to a childs toy and more particularly to a childs toy which when activated by the child produces a sound which may be varied by manipulation of the toy.

Many toys which make noise have been marketed for children. These toys are mainly of the percussive type in which a sharp sound is produced by striking a portion of the toy or by two parts of the toy which strike automatically together. Toys of this type are irritating to parents or any other persons in the vicinity. In addition these toys tend to make children more excited, nervous, and hard to control.

The toy of the present invention when actuated by the child produces a steady pitch or sound more harmonious and soothing than the toys previously made for children. A need has long existed for a childs toy which would sooth a child rather than excite him. A tone or sound which to some extent imitates a human voice can provide long hours of quiet pleasure for a child and his parents. While talking dolls have been made, the child must operate them by pulling a cord, an action of which any child quickly tires.

The toy of the present invention does not imitate words, however it does allow the child to constantly vary a pitch or sound, turn it off and on, so that the child has control over the sound created. Since the toy is battery operated no effort need be exerted by the child.

These and other advantages of the present invention will be more fully set forth in the following specification and claims, considered with the attached drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a circuit diagram;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation of an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a portion of the bottom of the embodiment shown in FIG. 5 and FIG. 5 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the present invention.

Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown a battery connected to a transistor 12. The battery is connected to the transistor emitter 14. The transistor base 16 is connected through a potentiometer 18 to one side 20 of a transformer 22. The transistor collector 24 is connected to the other side 26 of the transformer 22, as is a speaker 30 and if desired a lamp (not shown). The lamp is not required of course to produce the sound but may be employed to flash when the circuit is closed, if desired. A

switch 34 is provided in the circuit connected to battery 10. A condenser 28 is connected between the transformer 22 and the transistor base 16 to form the circuit.

When the switch 34 is closed a note of fixed frequency is impressed upon the transistor 12 which note can be audibly heard through the speaker 30. When the potentiometer 18, the variable resistance, is adjusted, the frequency of the note is altered and a different pitch is heard through speaker 30.

Referring now to FIG. 2 and FIG. 3, the toy of the present invention is shown. The body of the toy 36 is in the shape of a space ship or flying saucer; that is the body 36 consists of a lower conical section 38. An upper conical section 40 is inverted on top of section 38 so that 'the larger diameter of the two conical sections meet and are fixedly attached together at the center seam 42. The body may be made from any solid material such as aluminum or plastic. A clear plastic is particularly desirable since the child then has an opportunity to view the electrical components which would be fixedly attached to the inner surface of the body 36.

The cannon or weapon 44 of the space ship is in the form of a button fixedly attached through the body 36 at a point just below the middle seam 42 of the body 36. Depressing button 44 actuates switch 34 located inside body 36. Depressing button 44 therefore closes the circuit shown in FIG. 1 and a note of fixed frequency and pitch is heard through speaker 30.

The power generation unit 46 of the space ship in the shape of a conical dial is fixedly attached to a rod (not shown) passing through the top of the upper portion 40. Rotation of the power generation unit 46 modifies the resistance of the potentiometer 18 of the circuit shown in FIG. 1, changing the pitch and frequency of the note heard.

Manipulation of the button 44 on the one hand and the dial 46 on the other hand allows the child to produce a constant sound of fixed frequency, to produce a constant sound of varying frequency or an intermittent sound of constant or varying frequency.

A color code 48 may be provided if desired, fixed to upper portion 40 around dial 46. A viewing slot 50 is provided in the power generation unit, dial 46, so that rotation of the dial 46 rotates the slot 50. Any given frequency or setting of the potentiometer 18 by setting dial 56 will correspond to a color seen in the viewing slot 50.

FIG. 4 shows the bottom 52 of the space ship body 36 with vents 54. The speaker 30 shown in FIG. 1 is fixed inside and adjacent the bottom 52 so that the sound can be heard through vents 54.

FIG. 5 shows an alternative childs toy, a space weapon or gun, in the form of an elongated cone 56. A smaller cone 58 is inverted at the upper end of cone 56 so that the smaller diameter of each cone 56 and 58 are joined at seam '60. A trigger device 62, in the form of a button is fixedly attached through the cone 56. Depression of button 62 closes the circuit shown in FIG. 1, to produce a constant sound of fixed frequency and pitch. A power control knob 64, designated to control the amount of power in the space weapon, is rotated to vary the resist ance, adjust the potentiometer 18 mounted inside the weapon, and varies the frequency and pitch of the note heard through speaker 30. As in the space ship toy of FIGS. 2 and 3, a child can manipulate the switch and knob to create a constant or varying tone. A color code 66 viewed through slot 68 allows repetitive setting of the knob at any certain pitch.

Lamp 32 is optional and can be included in either the design of FIGS. 2 and 3 or FIG. 5 in addition to the sound created and is preferably viewed through a transparent section.

Children playing with the toy of this invention develop coordinative and rhythmic ability in both their hands through manipulation of the switch and knob. In addition the sound quality tends to soothe the children and keep them relaxed and quiet.

It is evident that changes and modifications may be made in the embodiments of the invention described above without departing from the spirit of the invention. However, the embodiments shown are preferred due to their portability, their relationship to present interest in space exploration, particularly to children, as well as the fact that their shapes provide a convenient receptacle for the components and they allow the child to operate the toy easily while coordinating two hands.

I claim:

1. A childs toy in which a sound is produced comprising a toy space weapon having circuit means including sound producing means, movable switch means simulating a trigger device and potentiometer control means including a revolvable knob simulating a power unit wherein depression of said trigger device closes said circuit causing a sound to be produced and rotation of said power unit changes the pitch of the sound produced.

2. The toy of claim 1 in which depression of said trigger device causes said switch means to close impressing a note of fixed frequency upon a transistor.

3. The toy of claim 1 in which a light fixed inside said weapon goes on when said trigger device is depressed.

4. The toy of claim 1 in which a color code located on said weapon is visible through a slot in said power unit.

5. A childs toy in which a sound is produced comprising a toy space ship having circuit means including sound producing means, movable switch means simulating a weapon and potentiometer control means including a revolvable knob simulating a power unit wherein depression of said weapon closes said circuit causing a sound to be produced and rotation of said power unit changes the pitch of the sound produced.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3150461 *Nov 25, 1960Sep 29, 1964Grist Franklin JamesToy sounding space helmet
US3233362 *Dec 19, 1961Feb 8, 1966Robert D ChapmanToy satellite with radio signal generating means
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4080753 *Mar 28, 1977Mar 28, 1978Hiner William DSignal generating flying saucer with thin central vibratile portion
US4107462 *Jun 9, 1977Aug 15, 1978Satya Pal AsijaElectroventriloquist
US4160339 *May 18, 1978Jul 10, 1979Scott DankmanToy flying vehicle including sound effect generator
US4184119 *Apr 12, 1978Jan 15, 1980Wayne Crieghton MorleyRadio equipped space toy
US4249339 *Feb 16, 1979Feb 10, 1981Mattel, Inc.Space toy
US4274225 *Sep 11, 1978Jun 23, 1981Revell, IncorporatedModel with two-pole motor actuated siren and flashing lights
US4282680 *Jan 30, 1980Aug 11, 1981Marvin Glass & AssociatesManually operated frequency changer on wheeled toy with LED's
US4282681 *Nov 30, 1979Aug 11, 1981Mccaslin Robert EElectronic wand
US4285158 *Jul 30, 1979Aug 25, 1981Randall L. CourtsToy for detecting magnetic fields with electrical compass contacts
US4904222 *Apr 27, 1988Feb 27, 1990Pennwalt CorporationSynchronized sound producing amusement device
US5137488 *Aug 23, 1991Aug 11, 1992Peter YehSports rod equipped with sound reproducing means
US5314371 *Aug 2, 1993May 24, 1994Mason Kirk DToy weapon simulator for stress reduction
US5326328 *Apr 10, 1992Jul 5, 1994Robinson S EricPlay structures
US5931716 *Jun 9, 1997Aug 3, 1999Hopkins; Lloyd M.Illuminated flying toy
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/231, D21/443, 446/397
International ClassificationA63H5/00, A63H5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63H5/04
European ClassificationA63H5/04