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Publication numberUS3394507 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 30, 1968
Filing dateOct 4, 1965
Priority dateOct 4, 1965
Publication numberUS 3394507 A, US 3394507A, US-A-3394507, US3394507 A, US3394507A
InventorsJack Doke
Original AssigneeAngeles Metal Trim Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Metallic structure for interior walls to carry shelf brackets and wallboard
US 3394507 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 30, 1968 J DQKE METALLIC STRUCTURE FOR INTERIOR WALLS TO CAR SHELF BRACKETS AND WALLBOARD 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 4, 1965 INVENTOR.

July 30, 1968 J. DOKE METALLIC STRUCTURE FOR INTERIOR WALLS T0 CAR SHELF BRACKETS AND WALLBOARD 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 4, 1965 W w l iulm J46! BY [5 INVENTOR.

7 nna/5V OKE Jab 30, 1968 J. D C'IURE FOR F BRACKETS AND INTERIOR WALLS TO CAR WALLBOARD 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 METALLIC STRU SHEL 5 Filed Oct. 4, 196

OR. x1462. 00,86"

INVENT Awf/V'f United States Patent assignor to Angeles Metal Angeles, Calif., a corporation of This invention relates to structures for interior walls of buildings and more especially to metal structures particularly adapted to partitioning walls in buildings used as large merchandising establishments, such as department stores wherein much merchandise is desirably displayed on shelves and supporting brackets carried by the interior walls.

A particular object of this invention is to provide simplified upstanding metallic wall stud structure with which well-known wall board, such as plasterboard, may be used as a wall surfacing material, and with which wallboard and vertical wall structure shelf brackets may be used in adjustably mounted positions for the carrying of shelves or for directly supporting merchandise pieces themselves.

An object of the present invention is to provide a vertical or upstanding metal wall structure which is relatively simple to produce, major portions of which are readily assembled in the manufacturing plant, and which portions may be readily installed as partitions in large storerooms and the like, and may be easily set up to extend either up to the ceiling of the storeroom, or to a lesser height, as desired.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a metallic wall stud assembly provided with bar or plate means or standard having bracket receiving slots which means are readily mounted in position in their respective metal stud structures so as to be easily adjusted vertically in order that shelving may be disposed in level positions.

A further object of the invention is to provide a metal stud and wall construction of improved nature wherein a slotted plate or bar for receiving the mentioned shelf brackets may be adjusted with relation to the respective studs and then bound in adjusted position to flanged portions of the metal studs, as by means of self-threading screws which are quickly driven into position by means of known heavy-duty motor driven screwdriver units. Such screws may be employed for the sole purpose of binding the slotted plates in position on the metal studs or for binding wallboard in position on the flanges of the metal studs, or both.

Briefly stated, in the best mode of practicing the invention known at this time, the present invention employs in a stud assembly, two upstanding or vertical channeled metal studs, which may approximate 2" x 4" in overall cross-section. These two channeled metal studs are disposed back-to back and rigidly secured together, as by means of spot welding. The opposite edges of these channeled stud-s provide flanges and each flange is in the form of a reverse bend providing an elongated narrow channel which will slidably receive a slotted metal supporting plate for shelf brackets or the like. When the mentioned two channeled studs are secured back to back, the thin shallow channels formed in the opposing flanges of the opposing metal studs provide a slot which extends vertically from end to end of the resultant stud assembly and frictionally receives an elongated slotted plate or bar element to receive shelf brackets, as above indicated, which brackets are to be adjustably mounted in such elongated slotted element. The reversely bent outermost portions of the opposed studs are spaced to provide access by shelf brackets to the slots in the vertical slotted plate members. Additionally, opposing portions of the wall stud members adjacent their outer edges are shaped to provide, when assembled in back-to-back relationship, an elongated narrow pocket or passageway behind the slotted bracket supporting plate of suflicient depth to receive inner ends of the shelf brackets and narrow enough from side to side to engage inner edge portions of the shelf brackets and limit or prevent them from swaying laterally at their outward ends. Also, standard wallboard slabs, or the like, may be screwed to the outermost walls of the flanges of the opposed channeled wall studs, with opposing edges of such wall boards spaced to accommodate the passage of the inner portions of the mentioned shelf brackets into operative positions.

Other objects of the invention and various features drawings which form a part hereof.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a portion of a wall structure embodying vertical rigid metal wall stud assemblies of this invention, these being shown in operative relation with wallboard slabs and shelf-supporting brackets thereon;

FIG. 2 is a horizontal section through a metal wall stud assembly taken on line 22 of FIG. 1 and equipped for mounting shelf brackets and shelves at both sides of the wall;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to that of FIG. 2 showing a similar structure equipped for mounting shelf brackets at only one side of the wall;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional showing of the mounting of appropriate shelf brackets; and

FIGS. 5 to 10 show variously in fragmentary perspectives and in cross sections various forms of a slotted narrow vertical plate or bar carried in flanges of the wall stud assembly for supporting shelf brackets.

As seen in FIG. 1, and also in FIGS. 2 and 3, metallic wall stud assemblies 10 of this invention are built up metal wall stud members, herein termed studs 12. Each stud 12 has a main web 14 provided at its two edges with laterally disposed channeled flanges 15. The webs 14 of each pair of studs 12 are arranged back-to-back and rigidly connected together as by means of spot welds 16.

In constructing a wall structure with stud assemblies 10 as indicated in FIG. 1, a suitable runner 20 is positioned upon the building floor to receiv the lower ends of the stud assembly units. In the form illustrated, this runner 20 is a metallic structure of rectangular configuration having a web 22 appropriately secured to the floor and integral upstanding flanges 21 at its sides to receive between them the lower ends of the studs 12. Desirably, a similar runner (not shown) is provided at an elevated position which may be upon the ceiling of the building, or at a lower position such as on top of a partition if lower partition walls are being installed. Both upper and lower runners 20 frictionally receive the outer walls of the stud flanges 15 between the runner flanges 21. This relationship is maintained as by means of spot welds or preferably by self-threading screws such as illustrated at 25.

In practice, both the upstanding studs 12 and the runners 20 provide overall rectangular configurations which correspond, in cross-sectional outline, with typical wooden two-by-fours (2 x 4s), these channeled studs and runners are commonly produced from galvanized steel or iron sheet of about 26 gauge, or about 0.022 thickness. In employing indicated stud assemblies 10 produced from the channeled metal studs 12 by welding them together back-to-back, such stud assemblies may be produced in the shop or the manufacturing plant of any appropriate length and then moved onto the job for final wall assembly in properly spaced relationship along the runners 20.

An important aspect of this type of metal wall construction is that provision be made in the stud assemblies for the mounting of shelf brackets or other brackets or supports such as indicated at to support shelves S. In the present construction, this is accomplished through the medium of upstanding slotted narrow plate means or standards or bars 32 which are mounted in shallow vertical channels 33 in the flanges 15. Each narrow plate or bar 32 is provided along a vertical median line with vertically disposed spaced slots 34 for reception of the inner ends of the respective brackets 30.

As well illustrated in FIG. 2, each flange 15 of each metal stud 12 is reversely bent at 35 to provide the abovementioned vertical channel 33 in the respective stud. With this arrangement, as indicated in FIG. 3, the reverse bend at 35 results in an inner vertical wall 36 and a reentrant opposing intermediate vertical wall 38. This reentrant wall 38 leads to a position somewhat short of the projection of the main web or back member 14 of the stud at which position it is again reversely bent to form an outer wall 40. If desired, this outer portion of the flange 15 may be provided with an inwardly bent terminal flange 42 approximately co-extensive with the bend 35. With the two opposing studs 12 arranged as illustrated, the two opposing vertical channels 33 of the assembly pro vide a sufficiently wide channel for insertion of a slotted plate or bar 32. As also seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, tight or contiguous reverse bends 44 at the inner edge of the walls of the two studs 12 are spaced to provide a vertical entry way 45 to pass the inner end portions of the respective brackets 30 or other supports. Wall portions 46 of the opposing back walls 14 behind the bar 32 are laterally offset to provide a pocket 48 between them into which the end portion of the respective bracket 30 enters after being passed through a corresponding slot 34 in the plate 32. Thus, the walls 36, 38, and 40 of the flange member 15 are all parallel to one another and to the transverse axis of the channel 33, and these are all normal to the web or back wall 14 and the transverse axis of the pocket 48. Also, the channels 33, the entryway 45, and the pocket 48 combine to form a longitudinally extending T-shaped slot or passageway receiving the bar or standard 32 and the inner end portions or tongues 52 of the brackets 30 or other supports projecting through the slots 34.

The opposing inner walls of the portions 46 serve in general as means to limit lateral sway of the respective shelf brackets 30. However, since the entryway 45 is wider than the slots 34 and the thickness of the brackets 30, the wall portions 46 are tapered toward each other as indicated at 50 for engagement thereby of innermost hooked tongue portions 52 of the respective shelf brackets, as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3. With this arrangement the opposite edges of each slot 34 in the plate or bar 32 serve as fulcrums to stabilize the inner portion 52 of the respective bracket held in slightly yielding relation in the tapered portion of the pocket 48 between the inclined walls 50. Thus the inner end of each bracket 30 is snugly held so that there is very little lateral sway of the outer end of the bracket. This is assured by reason of the fact that the hooked inner end 52 of each bracket 30 is in the form of a locking tongue, such as illustrated in FIG. 4, so that when the tongue 52 drops into the operating position shown in the lower portion of FIG. 4, the bracket 30, now in its level position, is held with the innermost edges of the tongue bound between the converging wall portion 50, as seen in FIG. 2.

In practice, when a metallic wall stud assembly 10 is produced by securing together two identical studs 12 in back-to-back relationship as illustrated, a slotted bracket supporting plate or standard or bar 32, is inserted into the wide but shallow, vertical channel formed by the two opposing channels 33, with the various slots 34 aligned with the entryway 45 and with the pocket 48 behind the plate or bar 32. This assembly, as has been indicated, is desirably performed in the shop or manufacturing plant with the slotted bars held frictionally in place but without the brackets installed, and then transported to the job. The plates or bars 32 are commonly produced from bar stock about Vs" in thickness, and the thickness of the vertical channel 33 is only slightly greater than the thickness of the element 32. Thus when the plate or bar element 32 is inserted into the channels 33, a fairly snug fit is produced, as a result of which the plate or bar 32 retains substantially the position in which it was placed in the plant. Later, when a wall is being constructed on the job and brackets 30 are being adjusted to desired levels, the plate or bar 32 is anchored in the channels 33 by means of self-threading screws 55 which are driven by power-driven screwdrivers into the positions illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3. Such screws 55 are driven through the various wall portions 36, 38, and 40, and simultaneously through the respective bar 32.

Desirably, such screws 55 are placed above and below slabs of wallboard employed in surfacing the main portion of the wall being constructed and behind the wallboard slabs 62 and 64, as presently to be described.

In operating practice, stud assemblies 10 would ordinarily be sent to the job in some adequate length, such as 10 feet, and then cut to shorter lengths on reaching the job, if desired. The wallboard slabs 60 to be employed are ordinarily cut shorter than 10 feet, such as 6 feet in length. These slabs 60 may extend up from closely adjacent the floor, if desired, or they may extend downward only to the top of a foot board section 62. The lengths of the bracket-supporting plates or bars 32 desirably are somewhat longer than the lengths of the wallboards 60, but need be only enough longer to make it possible to mount the self-threading screws 55, which anchor the plates 32, above and below the main wallboard slabs 60.

Two main forms of the invention are illustrated. In one, illustrated in FIG. 3 (and also in FIG. 7), a metal trim element 70 is employed to protect the opposing edges of the slab 60. In this case the screws 55 are located behind the wallboard slabs 62 and 64 so as not to interfere with the positioning of the trim 70. This condition is represented at the lower left of FIG. 1. In the other, as illustrated in FIG. 2 (and also in FIGS. 6 and 8), no trim member 70 is employed. In this case the screws may be located behind the main wallboard slabs 60. However, to facilitate the showing in FIG. 3 (and also FIG. 7), the heads of the plate screws 55 are shown underlying the boards 60, and such an arrangement is indicated also at the upper left of FIG. 1.

In the structure shown in FIG. 2, the slots 34 in the plates 32, as well as the configuration of the pockets 48 as described, may be relied upon entirely to prevent sway of the outer ends of the brackets 30. However, in order to avoid possible damage to the edges of the wallboards 60 by excessive lateral movement of the brackets 30, it may be desirable to employ channeled U-shape metal trim lengths 70, as shown in FIG. 3 in detail, which enclose the edges of the wallboards 60 and are positioned close enough to the sides of the shelf brackets 30 to more thoroughly stabilize their outer ends.

In mounting the wallboards 60, self-threading boardretaining screws 65 are caused to extend through the edges of the flanges 15 outside of the locus of the plates or bars 32 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. This is also true of the structure of FIG. 3 where the channeled metal trim lengths are employed. In practice, the heads of the bar-retaining screws 55 underlie the horizontal lower wallboard strip 62 and the upper wallboard strip 64 of FIG. 1. The heads of the screws 65 necessarily enter from the outer surface of the wallboards. In the case of the structure of FIG. 3, where the metal trim pieces 70 are employed, finish cement 72 is usually applied over the heads of the screws 65 and the outer flanges of the trim pieces 70 -to prepare a finished surface for painting.

Further stabilization of the constructed wall is effected by horizontal tie bars or brace bars 75 which are passed transversely through holes in intermediate portions of the webs 14 of the upstanding studs 12 and welded in rigid positions as indicated at 76.

Sometimes there are instances when there is a tendency to overload the shelf brackets 30, as a result of which the flat bars or standards, or plates 32 tend to warp or buckle or otherwise deform under the load, and there are also instances when it is desirable to supply greater resistance to lateral sway of the shelf brackets 30 than possible with the structures of FIG. 2 without necessity for reliance upon the channeled metal trim pieces 70 of FIG. 3.

Such additional stabilizations with respect to the flat bar 32 and with respect to lateral sway of brackets 30 are accomplished in the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 6 to 10.

As shown especially in FIGS. 6, 7, and 9, longitudinally extending bracket stabilizers 80 in the form of angle bars, or angle irons, are employed in longitudinally extending relationship on the bars 32 as particularly illustrated in FIG. 9. These angle bars, or angle bar stabilizers, 80 include in addition to their main, or base, webs, outstanding flanges 82. The webs are spot welded to their respective bars 32 as indicated at 84 in FIG. 9, or otherwise suitably rigidly secured to the respective bars 32. Thus, the opposed longitudinally extending flanges 82 are spaced from each other at opposite sides of the slots 34 in position to receive snugly between them the respective shelf brackets 30.

As illustrated in FIG. 6, the flanges 82 project into outwardly direct spaces 45a between the abutting ends of the wallboard slabs 60, where the spaces 45a are disposed in alignment with the space 45 (FIG. 2) between previously described flange structures 15 comprising the flange portions 36, 38, and 40. These angle bar stabilizers 80 are constructed of metal considerably heavier than that of the studs 12 (FIG. 2). The sides of the shelf brackets 30 bear lightly against the inwardly facing sides of the flanges 82, whereby the latter offer much resistance to lateral sway of the brackets 30. Also, when the ends of the wallboard slabs 60 are square cut, the slab ends themselves back up the flanges 82 and further offer resistance to sway of the shelf brackets 30. As desired, the flanges 82 may extend outward so that their outer edges lie flush with the outer faces of the wall slab 60 as indicated at the left in FIG. 6, or they may extend a portion of the way outward in the respective space 45a as indicated at the right of FIG. 6, opposed flanges 82 extend equally.

In addition to the stabilizing of the bracket arms 30 against sway, the rigid mounting of the angle iron stabilizers 80 upon the respective bars or plates 32 reinforces the bar or plate 32 in each instance. As a result, the tendency of the respective bar or plate 32 to bend or buckle under an overload placed upon the shelf brackets 30 is greatly reduced.

If preferred, the stabilized bar unit 32 of FIG. 9 may be reversed from the position shown in FIG. 6 and disposed in the position shown in FIG. 7, so that the flanges 82 extend back into the pocket 48 between the wall portions 46 of the stud walls 14. In this instance, of course, the flanges 82 will both be of the same narrower width in order to be accommodated in the pocket 48. Here the flanges 82 stabilize the inner end 52 of the bracket 30 between them. In this form of FIG. 7, it may be also desirable to employ channeled metal trim pieces 70 of FIG. 3, especially as shown at the left of FIG. 7. However, as shown at the right in FIG. 7, it may be desirable to form the inner end of the wallboard slab 60 in square cut relation and abutting against an outwardly projecting wall 70a of the metal trim piece whereby the wall 70a will be stabilized by the edge of the wallboard slab 60 itself. In this instance, the outer flange of the metal trim 70 may be eliminated, and its inner flange 70b extended laterally sufliciently to be penetrated by an adjacent selfthreading screw 65.

Another variation designed to prevent warping or buckling of the flat bars or standards or plates 32 is illustrated in FIGS. 8 and 10. Here, the flat bar 132 is composed of heavier material than that used in bars 32. For example, bars of A of an inch thickness may be employed. Here, slots 134 are provided along the median line of the bar to correspond with slots 34, and the middle portions of the bar 132 along its median line are routed out or grooved at 135 to reduce the thickness at the median line to the standard thickness of 4; inch so that the slots will receive standard shelf brackets 30 commonly found on market and represented in FIGS. 1 and 4. With this bar construction 132, the reinforcing stabilizers might be additionally used, as is illustrated at the lower left-hand corner of FIG. 10, if desired to minimize side sway.

If is thus seen that this invention provides an improved wall structure assembly which is easily assembled in a factory but which facilitates mounting of shelf brackets to mount shelves in level position at arbitrary or predetermined heights above a floor when installed in the wall structure of a building.

The invention claimed is:

1. A Wall stud assembly including:

a pair of upstanding channeled metal stud members having main -webs disposed in opposed substantially parallel relation and providing opposed spaced flange portions adjacent edges of said webs;

said opposed flange portions having therein opposed shallow vertical channels extending longitudinally of said stud members to adjustably receive therein a metal bar, and edge portions of said webs providing between them a vertical passage behind the spacing between said opposed flange portions,

means rigidly connecting such stud members in said parallel relation;

slotted bar means positioned in said shallow channels of said opposed flange portions and having slots communicating with said passage between said webs and with the spacing between said opposed flange portions for reception of inner ends of support,

said flange portions also providing means for engaging and supporting wallboards;

and means rigidly securing said slotted bar means in adjusted position in said vertical channels.

2. A wall stud assembly as in claim 1 wherein said standing channeled metal stud members are provided with opposed flange portions and slotted bar means so supported in said channels at both sides of said main webs.

3. A structure as in claim 1 wherein said slotted bar means carry angled flanges along opposite sides of the slots to reinforce said bar and pass said inner ends of said supports.

4. A combination as in claim 1 wherein said bar means is reinforced alongside said slots and grooved along said slots to reduce bar means thickness along the line of said slots.

5. A combination as in claim 1 wherein said bar means carries longitudinally thereof alongside said slots, means reinforcing said bar means to resist deformation under load On said supports.

6. A combination as in claim 5 wherein said reinforcing means includes angled flanges.

7. A wall stud assembly including:

a pair of vertical channeled metal stud members having main webs arranged back-to-back and having opposed flange portions at adjacent edges of said webs for carrying wallboard;

means rigidly connecting said stud members in assembled relation;

said flange portions having reversely folded portions providing a vertical passageway;

slotted plate means vertically disposed in said vertical passageway for vertical adjustment of such plate means therein and providing slots to receive inserted supports at their inner ends;

and means rigidly securing said slotted plate means in adjusted position in said vertical passageway.

8. An assembly as in claim 7 wherein the securing means extends through walls of said passageway.

9. A combination as in claim 8 wherein said securing means are self-threading screws.

10. A combination including a wall stud assembly as in claim 8, and wallboards secured to the outer-most walls of said opposed flange portions.

11. A combination as in claim 10 wherein securing means extend through said wallboards and through said flange means.

12. A wall stud assembly as in claim 7 wherein said slotted plate means carries longitudinally thereof alongside slots therein rneans reinforcing said plate means to resist buckling under overload.

13. An assembly as in claim 12 wherein said reinforcing means includes an angle bar having a flange located in said pocket, and means for engagement by the inner end of a support to stabilize the latter.

14. An assembly as in claim 7 wherein said slotted plate means is reinforced alongside slots therein and the plate is grooved along the line of the slots to reduce the plate thickness at the locus of said slots.

15. A wall stud assembly including:

a pair of upstanding channeled sheet metal stud members having main webs disposed in opposed substantially parallel relation, said stud members providing opposed spaced flange portions adjacent edges of said webs;

said flange portions having reversely folded portions providing opposed vertical channels forming a combined vertical passageway to receive slideably an adjustable vertical slotted bar, the reversely folded portions being opposed and providing between them a vertical entryway into said passageway;

said reversely folded flanges at said entryway being outwardly folded in each instance to lie in contiguous relation upon the flange wall forming the outer wall of the respective channel, and to provide an outermost face for attachment thereto of 'an edge portion of a wallboard, such edge portions of opposed wallboards lying in a spaced relation to permit access to said entryway;

and a slotted bar means vertically disposed in said vertical passageway;

means through said slotted bar means and secured to the flanges adjustably holding said slotted bar means in a vertical position relative to the vertical passageand support means extending between said edges of said wallboard through said entryway into slot means in said vertical bar means.

16. An assembly as in claim 15 wherein said plate means carries longitudinally thereof, alongside the slot means, reinforcing means to resist deformation under load on said support means.

17. An assembly as in claim 16 wherein said plate means is grooved along said slots to reduce plate thickness adjacent said reinforcing means.

18. In combination in a wall structure:

a pair of vertical channeled metal stud members having main webs and having opposed flanges at adjacent edges of said webs,

means rigidly securing said main webs in operative relation;

said opposed flanges being spaced apart and providing opposed shallow passageways extending vertically of said stud members to form a combined vertical channel for frictionally receiving opposite faces of a plate;

a plate vertically disposed in said combined channel for adjustment thereof in such channel and having slots communicating with the spacing between the opposed flanges for reception of the inner ends of support means;

and means fixedly retaining said slotted plate in adjusted position in said combined channel in said flanges;

and wallboards secured to said opposed flanges and in spaced relation to provide for passage of said inner ends of said support means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,558,428 6/ 1951 Fuller et a1. 52-27 2,633,945 4/ 1953 Millier 52-729 2,691,502 10/ 1954 Jones 52-36 2,971,805 2/1961 Weiss 52-36 3,081,718 3/ 1963 Shofiner 52-36 3,193,885 7/1965 Gartner et al. 52-36 3,250,584 5/ 1966 Tassell 52-127 FOREIGN PATENTS 778,686 2/ 1935 France. 1,227,316 3/1960 France. 1,315,429 12/ 1962 France.

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner.

JAMES L. RIDGILL, Assistant Examiner.

223 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 59 5% a Dated July Inventor(s) Jack D KE It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 5, line 50 (Page 15, line '5) change opposed" to Opposed--.

Column 8, line 4 (claim 29, line 2) change "plate" to --slot;ted bar--.

Column 8, line 8 (claim 30, line 2) change "plate" to --slotted bar--.

Sifiilifi km S rm 1 0 (SEAL) W Attest: A Edward M- Fletchel 1* m E; sum, JR" taming Offiw communion of Patent!

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/36.6, 52/363, 211/103, D25/131, 108/107, 248/241
International ClassificationE04B2/76, E04B2/78
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/7854
European ClassificationE04B2/78C