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Publication numberUS3395431 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 6, 1968
Filing dateDec 22, 1965
Priority dateDec 22, 1965
Publication numberUS 3395431 A, US 3395431A, US-A-3395431, US3395431 A, US3395431A
InventorsCarson Jr William R
Original AssigneeWilliam R. Carson Jr.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Casket lid with upholstery and method of construction
US 3395431 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 6, 1968 w, R. CARSON, JR 3,395,431

CASKET LID WITH UPHOLSTERY AND METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION Filed Dec. 22, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet l ATTORNEY Aug. 6, 1968 w. R. CARSON, JR 3 CASKET LID WITH UPHOLSTERY AND METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 22, 1965 INVENTOR WILLIAM R. CARSON, JR.

BYw fg w/wuvv ATTORNEY Aug. 1968 w. R. CARSON, JR 3,395,431

CASKET LID WITH UPHOLSTERY AND METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION WILLIAM R. CARSON, JR.

Mg/10W ATTORNEY Aug. 6, 1968 w. R. CARSON, JR

CASKET LID WITH UPHOLSTERY AND METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Dec. 22, 1965 INVENTOR WILLIAM R. CARSON, JR.

QZZ JJJW/ ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,395,431 CASKET LID WITH UPHOLSTERY AND METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION William R. Carson, Jr., Leesville, S.C. 29070 Filed Dec. 22, 1965, Ser. No. 515,662 11 Claims. (CI. 27-19) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A burial casket lid construction is provided with an exterior wall, such as of bendable metal. The marginal edges are bent inwardly to form flanges along the sides and ends. These flanges are adapted to hold corresponding marginal edges of stiff pieces of material such as cardboard, complementarily arranged to form in overlapping relation an inner wall of the lid. The pieces are provided with fold lines to delineate the marginal edges. Other fold lines provide a dished contour to the pieces along the inside surface of the outer wall. Providing these pieces in overlapping relation facilitates disposing their marginal edges behind the flanges, after which the pieces are connected together, such as by staples, which lock them in place and prevent their removal. After the pieces are thus set in place, cloth lining is attached by staples or otherwise to provide a desired fold efiect. To assist in this step, markings are applied to the cloth beforehand which include points of attachment to the pieces. The markings are applied by means of a templet having a pattern of apertures through which light is directed against the cloth, whereupon the markings are placed at the light spots. This provides a quick and simple construction for what is otherwise regarded as tedious and laborious.

This invention relates to burial caskets and it is more particularly concerned with their interior construction, as it applies to upholstery, and to a method of forming the interior.

The general objects of the invention are the provision of a burial casket interior and to a method of its construction, which are novel, practical and which obviate many difficulties of the prior art.

Other objects are the provision of an interior structure for a burial casket which is relatively simple to provide, which is fabricated of relatively inexpensive materials, and which does not require the use of highly skilled persons to assemble.

A further object is the provision of a burial casket interior which is especially adapted to the lid of the casket. These and still further objects, advantages and features of the invention will be apparent from the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawing.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a typical burial casket with the head section of the lid in raised position.

FIG. 2 is a top perspective view of the head section of the lid apart from the casket as a whole.

FIG. 3 is a bottom perspective view of the head section with parts of the interior structure cut away.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of one of the insert sheets that form part of the interior structure of the head section.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a second insert sheet that forms another part of the interior structure of the tion along the lines 88 of FIG. 7 showing the initial position of the sheet member of FIG. 5 in the process of its insertion in the section.

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 8 with the sheet member of FIG. 5 in its final position and showing in dotted lines its position just prior to being snapped in final position.

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view of the head section of the lid along the line 1010 of FIG. 3 with a portion of the upholstery material removed to show some of the index marks used in attaching it to the insert sheets.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of a lateral insert sheet for use in a modified embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of a longitudinal insert sheet for use in the modified embodiment.

FIG. 13 is a longitudinal sectional view of a type of casket lid known in the trade as a Perfection Half Couch showing the relative positions of the sheet members of FIGS. 11 and 12, along the line 1313 of FIG. 14.

FIG. 14 is a transverse sectional view of the same casket lid along the line 14--14 of FIG. 13.

Referring to the drawing with more particularity, the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 10 is shown in connection with a conventional head section 11 of the lid of a burial casket 12. These lids, conventionally, are frequently made of steel and they are hinged to the casket body by hinges 13.

The section 11 is also conventionally made in a bowed shape, as illustrated, leaving a hollow interior. The sides and outer end are tapered, while the inner end 14 adjacent the main section 15 is blunt. The four edges at the sides and ends are each turned inwardly to provide inwardly extending flanges 16, 17 and 18, 19, respectively.

The interior structure of the section 11 is formed of heavy sheets of cardboard, paperboard, fiberboard or any similar stiff material which can be scored and to which staples may be applied. These sheets are inserted behind the flanges 16, 17, 18 and 19 to the exposed surfaces of which upholstery material is attached.

One of these sheets 20 is generally rectangular with a trapezoidal recess 21 at one end. Trapezoidal side portions 22 and 23 are delineated by longitudinal fold lines 24 and 25. These side portions also comprise marginal extensions 26 and 27 delineated by longitudinal fold lines 28 and 29. The rectangular section 30) between the fold lines 24 and has a median fold line .31 extending longitudinally from one end to the other. This sheet member is inserted in the section 11 as illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7, by folding it along the lines 28, 29 and 31 to bring the opposite marginal extensions 26 and 27 closer together so that they can be inserted behind the flanges 16 and 17 assuming the position shown in FIG. 6. The center point is then pushed down until the sheet assumes the position shown in FIG. 7. Just before the sheet reaches its final position, the center rectangular section is in the position shown by the dotted lines in FIG. 7.

The second sheet 32 is also generally rectangular with a trapezoidal recess 33 and 34- on either side of two trapezoidal sections 35 and 36 at either end delineated by fold lines 37 and 38. The section 35 comprises a marginal extension 39 delineated by a fold line 40. The opposite section 36 comprises an end extension consisting of a web section 41 delineated by parallel fold lines 42 and 43 and an end portion 44 extending outwardy from the fold line 43 and having an outer end curvature corresponding to the curvature of the exterior wall of the lid section adjacent the blunt end 14.

The center rectangular section 45 between the fold lines 37 and 38 is also provided with a median fold line 46 parallel to the fold lines 37 and 38.

The second sheet is inserted after the first sheet has been disposed in its final position, as illustrated in FIGS. 8 and 9. Initially, as shown in FIG. 8, it is disposed by placing the marginal extension 39 behind the flange 18. End portion 44 is turned down at right angles so that the outer edge lies against the inside of the exterior wall adjacent the end of the first sheet. The sheet is then pressed down to the position shown in FIG. 9 which causes the web section 41 to shift to a position beneath the flange 19 and the end portion 44 to abut the blunt end wall 14. Just before reaching this final position, the sheet will be in the position shown by the dotted lines of FIG. 9. After it is forced to its final position, it is secured to the sheet 20 by means of glue or staples.

When the sheets have been thus set in place, an upholstery material, such as a piece of silk cloth lining 47, is applied to the exposed surfaces of the cardboard sheets, by staples 48 or by any other suitable means. This may be in any desired pattern or configuration, including those conventional in the art. To facilitate this application, the cloth can be first provided with markings 49 to designate the points of attachment to the sheets, and the sheets may also be provided with corresponding markings to designate the points of application thereto.

The markings 49 may be applied to the cloth by any suitable means, but a conventional light pattern table (not shown) has been preferred whereby the cloth is placed on one side of the table, and a source of light is directed through patterned holes in the table into the sheet. The points Where the light projects through these holes onto the sheet are then provided with the markings 49.

The modified embodiment of FIGS. 11 to 14 relates to a form of casket lid known as a Perfection Half Couch in which a top portion 50 corresponds generally to the lid 11 of the first embodiment, with the addition of an underlying frame structure 51 to which it is attached, such as by welding or by any other suitable means.

This modified form of caket lid has a substantially deeper and a different form of interior from that of the first embodiment, and it is necessary, therefore, to provide modified cardboard insert members for it.

The lateral insert member shown in FIG. 11 comprises a rectangular sheet having a trapezoidal recess 52 and 53 at either end and fold lines 54 and 55 delineating trapezoidal sections 56 and 57 at either side. As in the previous embodiment, the resulting rectangular section 58 is also provided with a median fold line 59 and for the same purpose. The side sections 56 and 57 also have each an extension 60 and 61, respectively, delineated by fold lines 62 and 63, which extensions are adapted to be disposed in channels 64 and 65, respectively, along the marginal longitudinal edges of the frame structure 51.

Above the channels 64 and 6-5 are corresponding inverted channels 66 and 67 at the top of the frame structure 51 on which the flanges 68 and 69 of the top pOrtion 50 rest. The outer edges of the inverted channels have beaded edges 70 and 71 which form lateral supports for the inner faces 72 and 73 of the trapezoidal side sections 56 and 57. The channels 64 and 65 also have beaded edges 74 and 75 which serve as a support for the outer faces of the trapezoidal sections near the fold lines 62 and 63, respectively.

The longitudinal sheet member shown in FIG. 12 comprises a generally rectangular sheet having a trapezoidal recess 76 and 77 on either side and a trapezoidal section 78 at the outer end delineated by a fold line 79. An extension 80 of the section 78 is delineated by a transverse fold line 81. The inner end has a crescent section 82 delineated by a transverse fold line 83. A transverse median fold line 84 is also provided in the center rectangular section 85. This sheet is disposed in the lid section as shown in FIG. 13. The outer edge of the section 78 and its extension 80 is disposed in an end channel 86 similar to and continuous with the channels 64 ad 65. It also has a corresponding beaded edge 87 for supporting the outer face of the section 78 near the fold line 81.

An inverted channel 88 similar to and continuous with the inverted channels 66 and 67 has a similar beaded edge 89 and functions as a similar support at the inner face of the section 78.

At the opposite or inner end of the frame structure 51, there is provided an arcuate shelf 90 generally parallel to the transverse curvature of the lid section at that oint. The outer curvature 91 of the crescent section 82 corresponds to the curvature of the shelf 90 and it is adapted to rest thereagainst, as shown. The edge of the crescent section is held in place by an overhanging beaded edge 92 of an inverted channel 93.

As in the first embodiment described, after the sheets are placed in the lid, upholstery material is applied to the exposed surfaces of the sheets in the same manner.

I claim:

1. A burial casket lid comprising an exterior wall having marginal edges bent inwardly to form flanges along the sides and ends of the wall, insert sheets of stiff material, each having a predetermined configuration to fit within at least a part of the interior of the lid between a pair of opposite flanges, one sheet covering are-a of the interior of the lid left uncovered by the other sheet, said sheets having overlapping medial sections, said sheets having fold lines delineating outer sections and additional fold lines delineating marginal portions adapted to fit behind the flanges, means securing said sheets together to hold the marginal portions in position behind the flanges, and a configuration of upholstery material supported by the sheets.

2. A burial casket lid as defined by claim 1, in which one of the sheets is in the general shape of a rectangle having a trapezoidal recess at one end, said fold lines delineating a trapezoidal section with marginal extensions at either side, and a rectangular section between said trapezoidal sections, said rectangular section having a longitudinal fold line adapted to cooperate with the other fold lines to permit accordion folding and unfolding of the sheet to facilitate disposing it on the interior of the lid with the marginal extensions behind opposite flanges of the lid.

3. A burial casket lid as defined by claim 1, in which one of the sheets is in the general shape of a rectangle having a trapezoidal recess at either side, said fold lines delineating a trapezoidal section with marginal extensions at either end and a rectangular section having a transverse fold line adapted to cooperate with the other fold lines to permit accordion folding and unfolding of the sheet to facilitate disposing it on the interior of the lid with the marginal extensions behind opposite flanges of the lid.

4. A burial casket lid as defined by claim 1, in which one of the sheets is in the general shape of a rectangle having a trapezoidal recess at one end, said fold lines delineating a trapezoidal section with marginal extensions at either side, and a rectangular section having a longitudinal fold line adapted to cooperate with the other fold lines to permit accordion folding and unfolding of the sheet to facilitate disposition on the interior of the lid with the marginal extensions behind opposite flanges of the lid, a second sheet being in the general shape of a second rectangle having a trapezoidal recess at either side and said fold lines delineating a trapezoidal section with marginal extensions at either end and a rectangular section between the trapezoidal sections, said last mentioned rectangular section having a transverse fold line adapted to cooperate with the other fold lines of the second sheet to permit accordion folding and unfolding of the said second sheet to facilitate disposition on the interior of the lid with the outer edges of its trapezoidal sections between opposite flanges of the lid and the adjacent interior wall thereof, one of said sheets overlying the other on the interior of the lid, and an upholstery material attached in a selected configuration to exposed surfaces of the sheets thus disposed.

5. A burial casket lid as defined by claim 3, in which one end of the casket lid has a curved configuration and the other end is blunt, and in which the exterior of the end of the sheet corresponding to the blunt end of the lid has a configuration adapted to fit in the space between the holding flange of the lid and the opposite end thereof.

6. A burial casket lid as defined by claim 1 in which the flanges of the marginal edges are secured to the top of an underlying frame, said frame having channels for receiving and supporting the ends of the sheets.

7. A burial casket lid as defined by claim 6 in which the underlying frame 'has co-acting members adapted to contact opposite surfaces of the sheets and hold them in place.

8. A burial casket lid as defined by claim 6 in which one of the channels has an inwardly facing convex curvature and the corresponding end of the sheet adjacent to said channel has a corresponding concave curvature adapted to register with and seat on the channel.

9. The method of upholstering a burial casket lid having internal flanges at the marginal edges of the lid, said method comprising forming insert sheets of stiif material with fold lines delineating outer sections and additional fold lines delineating marginal portions corresponding to the flanges, respectively, said sheets being complementary of each other to fill different areas of the inner space of the lid and having central portions thereof in mutual overlapped relation, orienting and placing the sheets separately on the inside of the lid so that one sheet covers areas left uncovered by the other sheet with the delineated marginal portions behind their corresponding flanges, securing said sheets together at their overlapped central portions and the marginal portions to the flanges whereby the sections become permanently retained relative to the flanges, and then securing cloth upholstery material to the sections in a desired configuration.

10. The method as defined in claim 9, in which markings are applied to the upholstery material to designate the places Where it is to be attached to the sheet material to effect a selected configuration.

11. The method as defined by claim 10, in which the markings on the sheet of cloth are provided by placing the cloth on one side of a surface having a plurality of apertures therethrough in a predetermined design relationship, placing a light source on the opposite side of the table and permanently marking the cloth at the points where light from the source projects through the apertures onto the cloth.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1/ 1959 Hillenbrand 2719 X 5/1967 Ross 2719

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2867030 *Feb 11, 1957Jan 6, 1959Batesville Casket Co IncBurial casket construction
US3316608 *Jun 11, 1965May 2, 1967Crane & Breed Casket CompanyInsert for casket top and methods of insertion
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6151762 *Jun 26, 1998Nov 28, 2000Vandor CorporationCasket top interior
US8276248 *Jun 14, 2010Oct 2, 2012Vandor CorporationThrow assembly for casket
US8307519 *Sep 22, 2009Nov 13, 2012Batesville Services, Inc.Memorialization casket
US9050234 *Sep 11, 2013Jun 9, 2015Vandor CorporationCasket head insert module
US20110067212 *Sep 22, 2009Mar 24, 2011Batesville Services, Inc.Memorialization Casket
US20110107567 *Jun 14, 2010May 12, 2011Vandor CorporationThrow Assembly for Casket
US20140068901 *Sep 11, 2013Mar 13, 2014Vandor CorporationCasket Head Insert Module
Classifications
U.S. Classification27/19, D99/7
International ClassificationA61G17/013, A61G17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61G17/0076, A61G17/00
European ClassificationA61G17/00