Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3395710 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 6, 1968
Filing dateJun 14, 1965
Priority dateJun 14, 1965
Publication numberUS 3395710 A, US 3395710A, US-A-3395710, US3395710 A, US3395710A
InventorsFritz Wach, Stratton Robert A
Original AssigneeFritz Wach, Robert A. Stratton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gastro-intestinal tube with inflatable weight releasing means
US 3395710 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

6, 1968 R. A. STRATTON ETAL 3,395,710

GASTRO-INTESTINAL TUBE WITH INFLATABLE WEIGHT RELEASING MEANS Filed June 14, 1965 INVENTORS F0652 7/415 review 779/ rz h flcxx ATTORNEY! United States Patent 3,395,710 GASTRO-INTESTINAL TUBE WITH INFLATABLE WEIGHT RELEASING MEANS Robert A. Stratton, 1913 6th Ave., and Fritz Wach, 2176 7th Ave., both of Yuma, Ariz. 85364 Filed June 14, 1965, Ser. No. 463,574 8 Claims. (Cl. 128-350) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Gastro-intestinal suction and medication introduction apparatus comprising a bi-lumenal, flexible tube having a smaller lumen within a larger one and inflatable means near the lower end of the smaller lumen adapted to inflate to substantially constrict the passageway of the larger lumen; a weighted object, such as a thin-walled rubber bag of mercury, a flexible element such as a thread secured to the bag and an enlargement secured to the opposite end of the thread from the bag, the enlargement adapted to be releasably retained in the tube larger lumen by inflation of the inflatable means to dispose the weighted bag relatively freely a short distance beyond the lower end of the tube.

A method of assembling, inserting, employing and withdrawing the tube is also described.

The foregoing abstract is not intended to be a comprehensive discussion of all of the principles, possible modes or applications of the invention disclosed in this document and should not be used to interpret the scope of the claims which appear at the end of this specification.

The present invention relates to improved apparatus for draining and medicating the gastro-intestinal region.

Gastro-intestinal tubes of the nasally inserted type are generally flexible, of a diameter sufficiently small to allow introduction of the tube through the patients nasal passage and of a length sufficient to permit the introduced end of the tube to reach the appropriate location so that gastro-intestinal contents can be removed by suction through the upper end of the tube which projects from the patients nose, or in some instances, from the patients mouth.

Although it is usually not diflicult to introduce such tubes to the stomach, prior art gastro-intestinal tubes are often found to be unsatisfactory for draining or medicating the small intestine because of the difficulty experienced in attempting to pass the lower end of such tubes through the ring shaped muscle at the lower end of the stomach or in retrieving the tube from the gastro-intestinal tract once the lower end of the tube has been introduced into the small intestine. To aid passage of the tube through the ring-shaped muscle at the lower end of the stomach, prior art devices have employed means such as bulbous weighted attachments on the lower end of the tube usually in the form of a thin-walled rubber bag containing air, water, mercury or the like. Progress of the tube lower end is often observed by fluoroscopy or X-ray techniques.

Beside being cumbersome and time-consuming, these procedures are sometimes unsuccessful since the natural tendency of the bulbous weighted object to descend in the gastro-intestinal tract is hindered by its direct attachment to the end of the tube. The feeding of the tube faster than its rate of descent sometimes causes it to coil in the stomach so that the lower end is not presented at the lower end of the stomach.

In instances where the practitioner is successful in introducing such prior art weighted bulbous lower end tubes into the small intestine, such difliculty is often encountered in attempting to withdraw the tube from the small intestine because of the tortuous passageway thereof and 3,395,710 Patented Aug. 6, 1968 the contraction of the ring-shaped muscles of the stomach about the tube, that the practitioner may be left with no alternative but to cut the tube at the nose of the patient and allow the tube to pass through the esophagus and gastro-intestinal tract in the normal manner. Fortunately, when such tubes are out they usually pass through the patient in about 24 hours, but instances Where such tubes when cut have taken up to three Weeks passing through have been reported. Needless to say, such a method causes some consternation to both the patient and his physician.

Recognizing this problem, others have proposed means for detaching the weighted object from the tube within the patient to facilitate withdrawal of the tube. Such constructions are exemplified by the tube shown in the US. patent of Barron, 3,155,097.

A prior art device for gastro-intestinal intubation has provided a feeding tube adapted to be inserted through a patients nose and carried to his stomach by a mercury filled bag disposed closely adjacent the lower, apertured end of the tube by a suture thread which loops through one of the apertures and through an eyelet on the bag. The ends of the suture thread project from the upper end of the single lumen tube. To release the bag, one end of the suture thread is pulled and the other released. The latter travels down the tube and upon being withdrawn from the bag eyelet, the bag is released. Apparently, when the bag of the prior art device is attached, suflicient tension must be maintained on the suture thread to key the bag to the tube, otherwise descent of the bag would not cause the tube to be drawn along. The tension on the thread undoubtedly increases the tendency of the tube to kink and at the least, decrease its flexibility. The size of the looped lower end of the tube of the prior art device would effectively prevent its use in the intestine, since the loop would probably be too large and rigid to pass through the stomach lower end ring muscle. If it were used as a gastro-intestinal tube the tube of the prior art device would necessarily possess many of the above-noted disadvantages of prior art Weighted tubes where the weight is attached closely adjacent the lower end of the tube. For instance, the release mechanism of the bag of the prior art device, while probably performing Well in the stomach, would encounter technical difliculties in the intestine were it used there, due to the necessarily longer tube length and the tortuous path which would probably increase suture thread friction against the tube to such an extent that the thread could not be successfully withdrawn.

Accordingly, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide apparatus useful in intestinal intubation including a flexible tube which will readily pass through the muscular contractile ring at the lower end of the stomach, into the upper part of the small intestine, or duodenum, and thence into the remainder of the small intestine if necessary and which can be dependably retrieved from this location by withdrawal through the patients nose or mouth.

A more particular object of the invention is the provision of a flexible gastro-intestinal tube having a weight releasably attached adjacent its lower end by a cord or the like of appreciable length which allows the bag to freely descend within the gastro-intestinal tract unhampered by the relative rigidity of the flexible tube, resulting in the pulling of the tube by the attached cord along the path traversed by the bag.

A further object of the invention is the provision of improved gastro-intestinal suction and medication introduction apparatus comprising a bi-lumenal, flexible tube having a smaller lumen within a larger one and inflatable means near the lower end of the smaller lumen adapted to inflat to substantially constrict the passageway of the larger lumen; a weighted object, such as a thin-walled rubber bag of mercury, a flexible element such as a thread secured to the bag and an enlargement secured to the opposite end of the thread from the bag, the enlargement adapted to be releasably retained in the tube larger lumen by inflation of the inflatable means to dispose the weighted bag relatively freely a short distance beyond the lower end of the tube.

Yet another object of the present invention includes the provision of a method for reliably accomplishing intestinal intubation and for equally reliably withdrawing the introduced tube.

These and further objects of the present invention will become more clearly apparent, as will the principles and scope of advantageous applicability of the present invention, during the course of the following detailed discussion which relates to the preferred embodiment of the apparatus of the invention that is illustrated in the accompanying drawing.

In the drawing:

FIGURE 1 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view of a tube embodying the present invention, the wall of the larger lumen being partly broken away to expose the smaller lumen, the inflated balloon and the balloon engaging bag retaining block;

FIGURE 2 is a transverse cross-sectional view taken substantially along the line 22 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a transverse cross-sectional view taken substantially along the line 33 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view similar to FIGURE 1, but showing the balloon in a deflated condition and the weighted bag, thread and retaining block escaping from the tube; and

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary perspective view of a modification shown in a condition thereof similar to the FIG- URE 1 condition of the preferred embodiment shown therein.

The apparatus includes a tube 12 of soft, flexible material such as rubber or synthetic plastic material preferably having an outside diameter sufliciently small to permit insertion of the tube in the patients nasal cavity and passage of the inserted end of the tube down the patients throat, esophagus and into his stomach and small intestine. For the normal human adult, a tube 12 of approximately ten feet in length has been found to be adequate and alow a suflicient amount of the tube 12 upper end 14 to extent from the patients nose or mouth after the tube 12 lower end 16 has reached the desired point to permit the attachment of suction, pressure, and other apparatus to the tube upper end.

The tube 12 comprises two lumen-s or channels 18, 20 the former being of smaller diameter and disposed within the latter so as to extend from the upper end of the tube 12 nearly to the lower end thereof.

The smaller lumen preferably comprises a flexible tube 21 of flexible rubber or synthetic plastic material. It may conveniently be attached to the inner peripheral wall 22 of the larger lumen 20 by solvent welding, heat sealing or any similar technique so as to extend longitudinally along. It is also within the purview of the invention that the tube 12 be extruded as a unitary biluminal tube utilizing conventional extrusion techniques and a die or extrusion head having a shape corresponding to the cross-sectional shape of the tube 12 as shown in FIGURE 2.

Within the larger lumen, near the lower end of the tube 12, an inflatable balloon 24 is provided at the lower terminous of and communicated to the smaller lumen. The balloon 24 may be a separately fabricated, thin-walled element secured as by heat sealing or solvent welding to the smaller lumen, or it may merely comprise a thin area formed in the peripheral wall 26 of the smaller lumen itself, similar to aneurysm of a blood vessel, the lower end of the smaller lumen beyond the thinner section then being closed off by heat sealing, solvent welding or the like.

The balloon 24 is of such elasticity that when inflated 4 it substantially blocks the larger lumen (FIGURE 3) and when deflated does not obstruct the larger lumen significantly more than does the smaller lumen (compare FIGURES 4 and 2).

To the upper end of the tube 12 may be secured a Y connector 26 having a leg 28 which communicates with the smaller lumen and a leg 30 which communicates with the larger lumen. The leg 28 is preferably connected to a source of pressurized fluid such as air or water in order to inflate the balloon 24 and maintain it in an inflated condition. The communication to the pressurized fluid is disrupted when deflation of the balloon is desired. The leg 30, communicating with the larger lumen, may be connected to a conventional suction device for removing gastro-intestinal contents and subsequently or alternatively to apparatus for the administration of medication or nutrition through the tube to the appropriate locations in the gastro-intestinal tract. In order to accomplish the gastro-intestinal contents removal and medication or nutrition administration, openings 32 are provided through the tube 12 into the large lumen of the appropriate locations.

An important portion of the present invention involves the discovery that the shortcomings of prior art weighted tubes can be overcome by disposing the weighted means ahead of the lower end of the tube and removably securing it to the tube by an extremely flexible element. In the apparatus 1i this is accomplished by providing a weight 34 shown being a thin walled rubber or plastic bag of heavy, fiowable material such as mercury or water.

The bag 34 is secured to one end of an extremely flexible element such as a surgical thread of silk or the like as. A block of plastic material, rubber metal or the like 38 is secured to the opposite end of the thread 36. The bag 34 is removably attached to the tube 12 by inserting the block 38 in the large lumen from the lower end of the tube, the balloon 24 being in a deflated condition. When the block 38 is slightly upstream from the balloon 24, the latter is inflated by pressurizing the smaller lumen from the upper end thereof. The balloon 24 in inflating blocks the larger lumen, preventing passage of the block 38 thereby. Preferably the balloon 24 is positioned with respect to the lower end of the tube 12 and the thread 36 of sufficient length that a significant amount of the extremely flexible thread 36, for instance 6-8 inches thereof extends between the bag 34 and the tube 12 lower end (FIG- URE 1).

The bag 34, thread 36 and tube 12 are progressively inserted in the patients nasal cavity in the FIGURE 1 condition thereof and allowed to progress under the weight of the bag 34 through the esophagus, stomach and intestine. It should be apparent that because of the freedom of motion allowed the weighted bag 34 because of its extremely flexible connection to the tube 12, the bag r descends in the gastro-intestinal tract under the influence of its fluidity, weight and the peristaltic action of the stomach and intestines, pulling the tube 12 after it more efliciently and with less chance of malfunctioning than is the case with prior art weighted tubes particularly in passing through the stomach lower end ring muscle and progressing along the small intestine.

When the tube 12 lower end has reached the desired position thereof within the gastro-intestinal tract, the weighted bag 34 is released from the tube 12 by deflating the balloon 24. This is accomplished by disconnecting pressurization from the Y connector 26 leg 28. Upon collapse of the balloon 24, the block 38 slips downwardly in the large lumen, past the deflated balloon and out of the lower end of the tube 12 (FIGURE 4). After this separation, the bag 34, thread 36 and block continue through the intestinal tract and will be eliminated from the body in the usual manner.

If after placement of the tube has been effected and the weighted bag, thread and block released, it is desired to discontinue suction or medication or nutrition application through the large lumen lower end, but continue such operations through the large lumen openings which are upstream from the large lumen lower end, this can be easily accomplished by reinfiation of the balloon 24 to completely block the lower end of the large lumen.

When use of the tube 12 is completed, it may easily be withdrawn from its point of entry since it no longer has the weight attached thereto. It is contemplated that in some instances, especially where the tube is intended to descend no further than into the stomach or a short distance into the small intestine, it may be possible to withdraw the tube after use without releasing the bag, thread and block.

A modification of the apparatus is shown in FIGURE 5. The apparatus of FIGURE 5 is similar in all respects to and similarly numbered as that shown in FIGURES 14 but for the inclusion of an electro-magnet 40 in the smaller lumen at the lower end therof in addition to or in place of the balloon 24. Wires 42 from the electromagnet proceed upwardly in the small lumen and project from the upper end of the tube 12, being connected to a source of electric potential such as a battery 44. Preferably, switch means 46 are provided in the circuit just described. In the embodiment of FIGURE 5, the block 38 is composed of ferro-magnetic material being removably retained in the large lumen of the tube adjacent the electro-magnet by magnetic force when the current is flowing through the magnet, i.e. when the switch 46 is closed. The tube of FIGURE 5 is inserted in the patients nasal cavity or mouth in a substantially identical manner to that described in regard to the tube shown in FIGURES 14. Release of the bag 34 when the lower end of the tube 12 has reached its desired position in the gastro-intstinal tract is accomplished by opening the switch 46, whereupon the ferro-magnetic block 38 slips out of the lower end of the large lumen. The ferromagnetic block 38, suture thread 36 and weighted bag 34 are eliminated as usual, and the tube 12 withdrawn through the patients nose or mouth when the mission it was inserted to facilitate has been completed.

It should now be apparent that the apparatus and method just described efliciently and reliably accomplish each of the objects of the invention as set forth at the outset of this specification and clearly outline the principles of the present invention. Because the specific embodiments depicted in the drawing can be considerably modified without departing from these principles the invention should be understood as encompassing all such modifications as are within the spirit and scope of the following claims.

We claim:

1. Apparatus for applying material to and removing material from the gastro-intestinal tract and especially the small intestine comprising: an elongated flexible tube having a large lumen, a lower end and an upper end; a weight; an elongated extremely flexible element secured by one end thereof to said weight; a block secured to the opposite end of said elongated extremely flexible element; said block having a lateral dimension sufiiciently small that said block is slida-bly receivable in said large lumen; said block being removably received in said large lumen near the lower end of said tube, said elongated extremely flexible element extending outwardly of said tube lower end and said weight depending therefrom; and means in said tube adjacent said block for releasably retaining said block in said large lumen.

2. Apparatus as set forth in claim 1 wherein the portion of said elongated flexible element which extends between the weight and the tube lower end is about 6-8 inches in length.

3. Apparatus as set forth in claim 2 wherein the elongated extremely tflexible element is a thread.

4. Apparatus as set forth in claim 1 wherein said means for releasably retaining said block in said large lumen comprises a balloon inflatable to retain said block and deflatable to release said block.

5. Apparatus as set forth in claim 4 wherein said balloon substantially blocks said large lumen when inflated.

6. Apparatus as set forth in claim 4 further including means defining a smaller lumen in said tube than said large lumen, said small lumen extending from said tube upper end to and communicating with said balloon whereby said balloon is inflatable and deflatable from said tube upper end.

7. Apparatus as set forth in claim 6 wherein said smaller lumen comprises a flexible tube secured to the inner peripheral wall of the first-mentioned tube and extending longitudinally therealong.

8. Apparatus as set forth in claim 1 wherein said block is composed of term-magnetic material and said means for releasably retaining said block in said large lumen comrpises an electro-magnet.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,489,067 11/1949 Wild 128-27 6 2,919,697 1/1960 Vim 128349 3,043,309 7/1962 McCarthy 128-348 3,155,097 11/1964 Barron 128-350 DALTON L. TRULUCK, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2489067 *May 22, 1947Nov 22, 1949Andrew E CarlsenIntubator apparatus for intestinal intubation
US2919697 *Oct 8, 1958Jan 5, 1960Kim Se KyongCatheters
US3043309 *Sep 29, 1959Jul 10, 1962Avco CorpMethod of performing intestinal intubation
US3155097 *Jul 17, 1962Nov 3, 1964Barron JamesFeeding and suction tubes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3863641 *Sep 26, 1973Feb 4, 1975Inst Pentru Creatie StintificThoracic drainage catheter
US3960153 *Feb 22, 1972Jun 1, 1976Jane Towne CareyApparatus for the palliative treatment of pleural effusions
US4134405 *Jan 10, 1977Jan 16, 1979Smit Julie ACatheter and intestine tube and method of using the same
US4166468 *Aug 5, 1977Sep 4, 1979Haynie Louis DApparatus for endotracheal and esophageal intubation
US4248221 *Aug 25, 1978Feb 3, 1981Latex Products (Proprietary) LimitedEndobronchial tubes
US4270542 *Oct 2, 1979Jun 2, 1981Plumley Peter FGastro-intestinal tubes
US4279251 *Jun 5, 1979Jul 21, 1981Willy Rusch Gmbh & Co. KgTube for enteral treatment
US4285341 *Sep 24, 1979Aug 25, 1981Pollack Charles NExtracorporeal cannula apparatus with retractable intralumenal balloon and method for using same
US4301797 *Nov 22, 1978Nov 24, 1981Pollack Charles NBalloon-tipped extracorporeal cannula apparatus and method for insertion of same
US4315509 *Oct 16, 1978Feb 16, 1982Smit Julie AInsertion and removal catheters and intestinal tubes for restricting absorption
US4335723 *Jul 31, 1978Jun 22, 1982The Kendall CompanyCatheter having inflatable retention means
US4341218 *Mar 6, 1980Jul 27, 1982University Of CaliforniaDetachable balloon catheter
US4369789 *Dec 10, 1980Jan 25, 1983Leveen Eric GInflatable gastric feeding tube
US4390017 *Aug 7, 1981Jun 28, 1983Harrison Eugene OEnteral feeding system
US4643192 *Feb 27, 1986Feb 17, 1987Regents Of The University Of MichiganHollow viscus tonometry
US5057091 *Jul 31, 1989Oct 15, 1991Corpak, Inc.Enteral feeding tube with a flexible bolus and feeding bolus
US5163921 *Oct 4, 1990Nov 17, 1992Feiring Andrew JValved perfusion cardiovascular catheters
US5318530 *Dec 6, 1991Jun 7, 1994Bissel Medical Products, Inc.Gastrointestinal tube with inflatable bolus
US5360403 *Jul 23, 1992Nov 1, 1994Lake Region Manufacturing Co., Inc.Balloon catheter with lumen occluder
US5391158 *Feb 24, 1994Feb 21, 1995Peters; Michael J.Nasogastric tube
US5415165 *Aug 16, 1994May 16, 1995Mountpelier InvestmentsTonometric catheter combination
US5433216 *Jun 14, 1993Jul 18, 1995Mountpelier Investments, S.A.Intra-abdominal pressure measurement apparatus and method
US5456251 *Oct 12, 1994Oct 10, 1995Mountpelier Investments, S.A.Remote sensing tonometric catheter apparatus and method
US5484412 *Apr 19, 1994Jan 16, 1996Pierpont; Brien E.Angioplasty method and means for performing angioplasty
US5526809 *May 19, 1995Jun 18, 1996Mountpelier Investments, S.A.For detecting the onset of ischemia in a hollow internal organ
US5690620 *Aug 19, 1996Nov 25, 1997Knott; Michael McfarlandAnatomically conforming nasogastric tube with normally-curved tip and method for using same
US5788631 *Feb 29, 1996Aug 4, 1998Instrumentarium CorporationHollow viscus and solid organ tonometry
US6010453 *May 12, 1995Jan 4, 2000Instrumentarium CorporationTonometric catheter combination
US6334064May 26, 1995Dec 25, 2001Instrumentarium Corp.Remote sensing tonometric catheter apparatus and method
US6595941Jan 11, 2000Jul 22, 2003Integrated Vascular Interventional Technologies, L.C.Methods for external treatment of blood
US6656151Jan 11, 2000Dec 2, 2003Integrated Vascular Interventional Technologies, L.C. (Ivit, Lc)Vascular access devices and systems
US6663590Jan 11, 2001Dec 16, 2003Integrated Vascular Interventional Technologies, L.C. (Ivit, Lc)Vascular occlusal balloons and related vascular access devices and systems
US7066914Mar 16, 2005Jun 27, 2006Bird Products CorporationCatheter having a tip with an elongated collar
US7118546Jul 21, 2003Oct 10, 2006Integrated Vascular Interventional Technologies, L.C.methods and apparatus for facilitating long-term, repeated access to a body fluid such as blood; one or more occludable access tubes that are adapted for anastomosis to an anatomical vessel; for withdrawing blood for testing, etc., or for inserting medications into patient's bloodstream
US7124570Jul 21, 2003Oct 24, 2006Integrated Vascular Interventional Technologies, L.C.Apparatus and methods for fluid occlusion of an access tube anastomosed to an anatomical vessel
US7131959Jan 23, 2003Nov 7, 2006Integrated Vascular Interventional Technologies, L.C., (“IVIT LC”)Apparatus and methods for occluding an access tube anastomosed to sidewall of an anatomical vessel
US7175638Apr 16, 2003Feb 13, 2007Satiety, Inc.Method and devices for modifying the function of a body organ
US7211094Oct 20, 2003May 1, 2007Satiety, Inc.Magnetic anchoring devices
US7214233Feb 13, 2003May 8, 2007Satiety, Inc.Methods and devices for maintaining a space occupying device in a relatively fixed location within a stomach
US7220237Jan 24, 2003May 22, 2007Satiety, Inc.Method and device for use in endoscopic organ procedures
US7229428Oct 23, 2002Jun 12, 2007Satiety, Inc.Method and device for use in endoscopic organ procedures
US7288099Dec 5, 2002Oct 30, 2007Satiety, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US7288101Jan 14, 2003Oct 30, 2007Satiety, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US7306614Feb 28, 2006Dec 11, 2007Satiety, Inc.Overtube apparatus for insertion into a body
US7503922Mar 27, 2003Mar 17, 2009Satiety, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US7510559Dec 5, 2003Mar 31, 2009Satiety, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US7695459 *Feb 3, 2006Apr 13, 2010Paul J. GilbertNasogastric tube insertion system and method
US7708684Feb 25, 2005May 4, 2010Satiety, Inc.Methods and devices for reducing hollow organ volume
US7740620 *Oct 10, 2006Jun 22, 2010Paul J. GilbertInsertion system and methods for nasogastric tubes including feeding tubes
US7753870Mar 25, 2005Jul 13, 2010Satiety, Inc.Systems and methods for treating obesity
US7753928Apr 14, 2005Jul 13, 2010Satiety, Inc.Method and device for use in minimally invasive placement of intragastric devices
US7757924Sep 28, 2006Jul 20, 2010Satiety, Inc.Single fold system for tissue approximation and fixation
US7789848Mar 5, 2007Sep 7, 2010Satiety, Inc.Method and device for use in endoscopic organ procedures
US7862574Jan 18, 2007Jan 4, 2011Satiety, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US7909838Jan 18, 2007Mar 22, 2011Satiety, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US7914543Apr 15, 2005Mar 29, 2011Satiety, Inc.Single fold device for tissue fixation
US7947055Mar 12, 2007May 24, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods and devices for maintaining a space occupying device in a relatively fixed location within a stomach
US7976518Jan 13, 2005Jul 12, 2011Corpak Medsystems, Inc.Tubing assembly and signal generator placement control device and method for use with catheter guidance systems
US8007505Aug 3, 2006Aug 30, 2011Ethicon Eado-Surgery, Inc.System for tissue approximation and fixation
US8057384Feb 12, 2008Nov 15, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods and devices for reducing hollow organ volume
US8062207May 13, 2005Nov 22, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Intra-gastric fastening devices
US8075577Mar 12, 2007Dec 13, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US8080022May 10, 2007Dec 20, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US8080025May 10, 2007Dec 20, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US8083756Jan 23, 2007Dec 27, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods and devices for maintaining a space occupying device in a relatively fixed location within a stomach
US8083757Mar 12, 2007Dec 27, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods and devices for maintaining a space occupying device in a relatively fixed location within a stomach
US8092378Dec 12, 2007Jan 10, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Remote tissue retraction device
US8092482Apr 19, 2006Jan 10, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Stented anchoring of gastric space-occupying devices
US8123765Jun 4, 2007Feb 28, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US8137366May 10, 2007Mar 20, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US8137367May 10, 2007Mar 20, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US8147441Mar 5, 2007Apr 3, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Method and device for use in endoscopic organ procedures
US8231641Jan 31, 2007Jul 31, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Method and devices for modifying the function of a body organ
US8252009Dec 29, 2005Aug 28, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Devices and methods for placement of partitions within a hollow body organ
US8257365May 2, 2007Sep 4, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods and devices for reducing hollow organ volume
US8357138Dec 27, 2006Jan 22, 2013Pierpont Family Limited PartnershipAngioplasty method and means for performing angioplasty
US8357174Mar 16, 2011Jan 22, 2013Roth Alex TSingle fold device for tissue fixation
US8403838Dec 12, 2007Mar 26, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Remote tissue retraction device
US8403839Dec 12, 2007Mar 26, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Remote tissue retraction device
US8419755Feb 16, 2011Apr 16, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US8449560Dec 29, 2006May 28, 2013Satiety, Inc.Devices and methods for placement of partitions within a hollow body organ
US8454503Nov 17, 2005Jun 4, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Remote tissue retraction device
US8590761Mar 9, 2007Nov 26, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Single fold system for tissue approximation and fixation
US8608691Oct 4, 2007Dec 17, 2013Pierpont Family Limited PartnershipAngioplasty method and means for performing angioplasty
US8613749Dec 5, 2003Dec 24, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US8628547Mar 9, 2004Jan 14, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Devices and methods for placement of partitions within a hollow body organ
US8784306Dec 12, 2007Jul 22, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Remote tissue retraction device
US8794243Mar 19, 2013Aug 5, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Obesity treatment tools and methods
US8795166Dec 27, 2010Aug 5, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Remote tissue retraction device
US8801650Feb 17, 2012Aug 12, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Method and device for use in endoscopic organ procedures
US8828025Feb 11, 2005Sep 9, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Methods and devices for reducing hollow organ volume
EP0155009A2 *Mar 15, 1985Sep 18, 1985Fresenius AGMedical tube
WO2006031934A2 *Sep 15, 2005Mar 23, 2006Daly Steven RoseSurgical sheath with instrument fixation structures
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/270, 600/562, 285/97
International ClassificationA61J15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61J15/00
European ClassificationA61J15/00