Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3396777 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 13, 1968
Filing dateJun 1, 1966
Priority dateJun 1, 1966
Publication numberUS 3396777 A, US 3396777A, US-A-3396777, US3396777 A, US3396777A
InventorsJr John N Reding
Original AssigneeDow Chemical Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process for impregnating porous solids
US 3396777 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 13, 1968 J. N. REDING. JR

PROCESS FOR IMPREGNATING POR OUS SOLIDS Filed June 1, 1966 M. H 1 a f: wfi w Q a n INVENTOR. John N. Rea fr? United States Patent 3,396,777 PROCESS FOR IMPREGNATING POROUS SOLIDS John N. Reding, In, Midland, Mich., assignor to The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, Mich, a corporation of Delaware Filed June 1, 1966, Ser. No. 554,537 9 Claims. (Cl. 164-97) This invention relates to the impregnation of porous solids with metals and more particularly concerns a novel method of vacuum casting of metals into porous solids.

Casting of metals, particularly light metals such as magnesium, aluminum and alloys thereof, into void spaces has long presented problems. The commonly employed methods of gravity feed, pressure feed and vacuum feed all present great difiiculty when attempts are made to fill spaces having small cross-sectional areas and irregular configuration. Even with the use of expensive equipment and controls, venting and the like, such methods are not suitable to impregnate the voids of porous solids. In recent years, a method has been devised for impregnating a porous material such as coke with a light metal such as magnesium by preheating the coke and plunging it into molten magnesium. However, this technique exposes a substantial portion of the surface of the molten magnesium to the air. The exposure of the molten magnesium to the atmosphere can produce burning and thereby requires the application of relatively large quantities of flux to eliminate or extinguish the burning. Also, exposure of the magnesium to the atmosphere and consequent burning produces MgO which increases the viscosity of the molten metal and adversely affects the impregnation of the coke. Likewise, the use of relatively large quantities of flux in the vicinity of coke causes contamination of the magnesium impregnated coke product causing it to be hygroscopic.

It is clear, therefore, that a need exists in the art for a simple and economical method for impregnating porous solids with metals which produces a more pure product and one which is not beset by the acknowledged problems of the art.

It is an object of this invention to provide a simple and economical method for impregnating porous solids with metals. A further object is to provide a novel process for impregnating porous solids with metals whereby a minimum of contamination from fluxes and metal oxides is obtained. These and other objects and advantages of the present process will become apparent from a reading of the following detailed description.

In carrying out the process of the present invention, a container is provided which has a single end open to the atmosphere and which is rotatable about a transverse axis between the open end and the opposing closed end. A quantity of porous solids of the desired particle size are added to the container and the open end is closed With a cover containing perforations which are smaller than the particles of porous solid. The covered container of porous solids is then positioned with the perforated end down and immersed in the molten metal a sufiicient distance to assure that the molten metal will form a liquid seal thereby closing off the interior of the container from the atmosphere. One preferred method of accomplishing this is to position the container above the molten bath of a metal such that rotation of the container will bring the perforated cover below the surface of the molten metal. The container is then rotated to place the perforated end below the surface of the molten metal, and is allowed to remain in this position for a predetermined period of time. At the end of such period, the container is rotated to raise the perforated end above the surface of the molten metal. As the perforated end of the container moves upward, most of the molten metal which is not contained within the pores of the solid will drain out of the container through the perforations leaving the metal-impregnated solids within the container. These impregnated solids are then easily removed and the container may be recharged with additional porous solids for impregnation.

A better understanding of the present invention together with its attendant objects and advantages will be facilitated by reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a sectioned side elevation of the porous particle filled container positioned over the molten metal.

FIGURE 2 is a sectioned side elevation of the porous particle filled container inverted and in contact with the molten metal.

FIGURE 3 is a plan view of the covered container in upright position above the molten metal bath.

In the preferred embodiment illustrated in the drawings, container 20 is filled with porous solid particles 21 and covered with perforated cover 22. Rod 23 is attached to opposing sides of container 20 at a point more than half way between the covered top 22 and the bottom of container 20. Rod 23 is fitted with a rotation handle 24 and bears against bearing surfaces 25 to facilitate rotation of both rod 23 and container 20. Molten metal 26 containing a thin covering of flux 27 and container 20 are positioned initially as in FIGURE 1 so that upon rotation of container 20 as shown in FIGURE 2, the perforated cover 22 will be below the surface of the molten metal 26 thereby sealing off the interior of the container 20 from the atmosphere.

Suitable porous solids for use in this invention include any normally solid particulate material having interconnected pores or void spaces and which is relatively dimensionally stable at the temperature of the molten metal which it must contact. Of particular utility are coke, sponge iron and compacts of various metals such as iron made by compressing irregularly shaped metal particles to form a cohered structure. Conveniently, a particle size of greater than about inch is employed.

The container used herein may be of substantially any geometry and made from any material having structural characteristics so as to be operable at the temperature of the molten metal which it will contact. Cylindrical or frustoconical containers made of iron or steel are readily available and relatively inexpensive so are usually preferred. To be useful herein, the container must have a single end open to the atmosphere. This end is fitted with a perforate cover which may be securely attached and which is removable. The perforations in the cover are smaller than the particle size of the porous particles but sufiiciently large to permit easy and unrestricted flow of molten metal into and out of the vessel.

A means is likewise provided for rotating the vessel to a desired position. It is normally most convenient to load the vessel with porous solid while it is in the upright position, i.e., with the open end upward. After loading and covering, the vessel is inverted and immersed sufiiciently below the surface of the molten metal to assure that all openings to the atmosphere are submerged below the surface of the molten metal. The molten metal thereby forms a liquid seal which prevents air from entering the vessel.

Metals suitable for use in the process of this invention to impregnate porous solids include magnesium, aluminum, sodium, potassium, lithium, strontium, barium, calcium, rare earth metals such as thorium or yttrium and mixtures and alloys thereof. These metals are employed in molten form at a temperature sufiicient to provide the desired degree of fluidity.

To produce effective impregnation of the pores of the porous solid material, it is necessary that the pores be interconnected and that the atmosphere of such pores and of the interior space of the container be at least partially reactive with the molten metal which is to be introduced therein. For example, when magnesium is the molten metal, the oxygen and nitrogen of the air contained within the container and within the pores of the porous material will react with the magnesium to form small quantities of solid MgO and Mg N This reaction creates a low pressure or a substantial vacuum within the container and within the porous particles whereby they become filled with molten magnesium. As the perforated end of the container is again rotated toward an upright position, the pressure returns to normal and the molten magnesium which has not infiltrated the pores of the porous material passes back through the perforations in the container cover and returns to the molten metal bath. The forces of surface tension retain the molten metal within the pores until the metal is cooled and solidified. In the same manner, molten aluminum will react with the air in the container and in the pores of the porous solid to create a vacuum and thereby produce impregnation.

The time required for metal to be drawn by the selfgenerated vacuum into the pores of the porous material will, of course, depend on the reactivity of the gas and the metal, upon the size of the pores, the temperature, and the like. However, impregnation is usually accomplished in from about 5 to about minutes. Once impregnation is complete, the perforated end of the container is removed from the molten metal, excess molten metal is drained from around the impregnated solids, and impregnated solids are removed therefrom either before or after they are cooled to solidify the molten metal. The composite articles thus produced may be used as castings having particular characteristics or, in the case of those infiltrated with magnesium, may be used as treating agents to nodularize iron or desulfurize steel.

For impregnation with most metals, it is advantageous to heat the container and the porous material to about the temperature of the molten metal prior to contact with the molten metal bath. This prevents the possibility of premature freezing of the metal and usually improves the rate and degree of impregnation.

Most metals, and particularly magnesium, are subject to oxidation in the molten state' when in contact with air. It is a usual practice, therefore, to cover the exposed surface of such molten metals with a protective layer or flux. For magnesium, typical fluxes consist of salt mixtures containing NaCl, KCl, MgCl and minor amounts of alkali or alkaline earth fluorides. When impregnating the metals into a porous solid, however, it is desirable to have as little contmaination of the metal as possible. The process of this invention permits the use of such a flux and, at the same time, keeps contamination to a very low level. As the container is rotated into the bath, the edge of the container sweeps away a substantial portion of the flux and allows the perforations in the cover to contact relatively pure molten metal below the flux layer. However, direct immersion of the perforated end of the container into the metal after the parting the flux is also suitable and provides less contamination than presently available methods.

The following examples are provided to more fully illustrate the invention but are not to be construed as limiting to the scope thereof.

EXAMPLE 1 A two inch diameter container was provided made of black iron, having a welded bottom, an open top and an internal volume of 6.5 cubic inches. Into the container was placed 60 grams of coke having a particle size of about At-inch. A perforate cover having multiple openings of about /z-inch in size was then fastened to the container. Both the container and the coke were heated to about l300 F. The container was positioned over a molten magnesium bath having a temperature of about l300 F. and covered by a thin layer of standard flux (Dow 234). As positioned in the upright position, the bottom of the container did not touch the surface of the magnesium bath. As the container was rotated, the upper edge of the cover skimmed away a major portion of the flux in the area of the contact and the perforated end of the container was immersed well below the surface of the molten magnesium. The container was maintained in this position for a period of 5 minutes during which time the air in the container and in the pores of the coke reacted with the magnesium, creating a substantial vacuum whereupon the molten magnesium filled the container and the pores of the coke. At the end of this period, the container was rotated to the original upright position, the cover was removed, excess molten metal was drained from around the coke particles, and the impregnated coke removed from the container. The container was then filled with fresh coke and the process was repeated. Four batches of magnesium-impregnated coke were prepared in this manner. Examination of representaive pieces in cross-section revealed that the pores were substantially completely filled with magnesium. Analysis showed the product batches to contain 41, 44, and 41 weight percent of magnesium, respectively. No detrimental contamination of the particles by the flux was found.

In a like manner, a two inch diameter container is filled with coke particles having a diameter of about %-inch and a cover containing Az-inch perforations is attached thereto. After attaching the cover, the container is inverted and directly immersed in a bath of molten magnesium. After draining of the excess magnesium from the container, the coke particles were found to be impregnated with magnesium.

In a manner similar to the above, particles of sponge iron and porous particles produced by compacting small irregular pieces of iron scrap or turnings were impregnated with magnesium and aluminum.

Various modifications can be made in the present invention without departing from the spirit or scope thereof for it is understood that I limit myself only as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A process for impregnating porous solids with metals which comprises (a) providing a container open to the atmosphere only at one end,

(b) providing a molten bath of a metal,

(0) introducing a particulate porous solid into said container and covering said open end with a cover containing perforations smaller than the particle size of said porous solid, said container cavity and the pores of the porous solid containing an atmosphere which is at least partially reactive with said molten metal,

(d) immersing the perforated end of the container below the surface of the molten metal,

(e) maintaining the perforated end of the container submerged in the molten metal for a predetermined period of time sufficient that the reactive atmosphere in the vessel and in the pores of the porous solid reacts with a portion of the molten metal thereby forming a reduced pressure and drawing the molten metal into the container and into the pores of the porous solid,

(f) removing the container from the molten metal, and

(g) removing the metal impregnated solids from the container.

2. The process as defined in claim 1 including the additional step of rotating the covered container to place the perforated cover below the surface of the molten metal.

3. The process as defined in claim 1 including the step wherein the container and the porous solid are heated to a temperature about that of the molten metal prior to contacting the perforated end of said container with said molten metal.

4. The process defined in claim 1 wherein the porous solid is coke.

5. The process as defined in claim 1 wherein the porous solid is sponge iron.

6. The process as defined in claim 1 wherein the porous solid is compressed into a compact of irregular iron particles.

7. The process as defined in claim 1 wherein the molten metal is magnesium.

8. The process as defined in claim 1 wherein the porous solid is coke and the molten metal is magnesium.

9. The process as defined in claim 1 wherein the molten metal is aluminum and the atmosphere in the container and in the pores is air.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Reding et al 164-63 Hucke 164-80 Conant 75-202 Bergh 75-53 'Grubel et a1. 29-1821 XR Koehring 29-182.1 XR Kurtz 75-22 Hunt 29-1912 Scott et al 164-98 J. SPENCER OVERHOLSER, Primary Examiner.

15 V. K. RISING, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1053880 *Mar 31, 1911Feb 18, 1913Campbell ScottProcess of impregnating.
US1555978 *Aug 26, 1920Oct 6, 1925American Magnesium CorpMetal stock
US2192792 *Jul 28, 1938Mar 5, 1940Gen Motors CorpMethod of sintering and impregnating porous metal briquettes
US2665999 *Dec 28, 1951Jan 12, 1954Gen Motors CorpMethod of impregnation
US2671955 *Dec 14, 1950Mar 16, 1954Mallory & Co Inc P RComposite metal-ceramic body and method of making the same
US2881068 *Apr 27, 1953Apr 7, 1959Wargons AktiebolagMethod of treating a ferrous melt with a porous sintered metal body impregnated with a treating agent
US3166415 *Dec 28, 1960Jan 19, 1965Union Carbide CorpMagnesium-based alloys
US3235346 *Nov 22, 1960Feb 15, 1966Valley Co IncComposite bodies comprising a continuous framework and an impregnated metallic material and methods of their production
US3364976 *Mar 5, 1965Jan 23, 1968Dow Chemical CoMethod of casting employing self-generated vacuum
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3529655 *Oct 3, 1966Sep 22, 1970Dow Chemical CoMethod of making composites of magnesium and silicon carbide whiskers
US3634066 *Jun 26, 1969Jan 11, 1972Dow Chemical CoMethod for reclaiming scrap metal particles
US3945819 *Oct 15, 1974Mar 23, 1976N L Industries, Inc.Ferrous metal network impregnated with magnesium metal
US3957502 *Sep 9, 1974May 18, 1976Magnesium Elektron LimitedAddition of magnesium to molten metal
US3971655 *Aug 21, 1974Jul 27, 1976Nippon Steel CorporationMethod for treatment of molten steel in a ladle
US3984233 *Feb 12, 1975Oct 5, 1976Nl Industries, Inc.Ferrous metal network impregnated with rare earth metals
US4254621 *Mar 2, 1979Mar 10, 1981Nissan Motor Company, LimitedHeat-insulating layer to prevent temperature drop of combustion gas in internal combustion engine
US4312668 *Nov 9, 1979Jan 26, 1982The International Meehanite Metal Company LimitedIntroducing nodularizing agent into cast iron
US4491303 *Sep 22, 1983Jan 1, 1985Pont-A-Mousson S.A.Loading method and installation for a metal alloy founding furnace to supply foundry molds
US4511401 *Oct 19, 1981Apr 16, 1985The International Meehanite Metal Company LimitedProcess for the treatment of molten metal
US4708737 *Aug 25, 1986Nov 24, 1987The Dow Chemical CompanyMagnesium or alluminum or alloys
US4744945 *Jul 28, 1986May 17, 1988Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki KaishaProcess for manufacturing alloy including fine oxide particles
US4802524 *Feb 23, 1984Feb 7, 1989Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki KaishaMethod for making composite material using oxygen
US4871008 *Jan 11, 1988Oct 3, 1989Lanxide Technology Company, LpHeating metal and filler with oxidant to form reaction product which infiltrates filler
US4921533 *Jun 5, 1989May 1, 1990Galt Industries, Inc.Ferro-aluminum composite pig
US4954166 *Nov 17, 1989Sep 4, 1990Westinghouse Electric Corp.Production of sponge metal from sponge metal fines
US4998578 *Jul 17, 1989Mar 12, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of making metal matrix composites
US5000245 *Nov 10, 1988Mar 19, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpInverse shape replication method for forming metal matrix composite bodies and products produced therefrom
US5000246 *Nov 10, 1988Mar 19, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpFlotation process for the formation of metal matrix composite bodies
US5000247 *Nov 10, 1988Mar 19, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod for forming metal matrix composite bodies with a dispersion casting technique and products produced thereby
US5000248 *Nov 10, 1988Mar 19, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of modifying the properties of a metal matrix composite body
US5000249 *Nov 10, 1988Mar 19, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming metal matrix composites by use of an immersion casting technique and product produced thereby
US5004034 *Nov 10, 1988Apr 2, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of surface bonding materials together by use of a metal matrix composite, and products produced thereby
US5004035 *Nov 10, 1988Apr 2, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpDiffusion of filler into metal matrix
US5004036 *Nov 10, 1988Apr 2, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpSelf-supporting
US5005631 *Nov 10, 1988Apr 9, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod for forming a metal matrix composite body by an outside-in spontaneous infiltration process, and products produced thereby
US5007474 *Nov 10, 1988Apr 16, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of providing a gating means, and products produced thereby
US5007475 *Nov 10, 1988Apr 16, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod for forming metal matrix composite bodies containing three-dimensionally interconnected co-matrices and products produced thereby
US5007476 *Nov 10, 1988Apr 16, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming metal matrix composite bodies by utilizing a crushed polycrystalline oxidation reaction product as a filler, and products produced thereby
US5010945 *Nov 10, 1988Apr 30, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpInvestment casting technique for the formation of metal matrix composite bodies and products produced thereby
US5016703 *Nov 10, 1988May 21, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming a metal matrix composite body by a spontaneous infiltration technique
US5017219 *May 21, 1990May 21, 1991Westinghouse Electric CompanyUtilization of sponge metal fines
US5020583 *Nov 10, 1988Jun 4, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpEnhancing infiltration
US5020584 *Nov 10, 1988Jun 4, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod for forming metal matrix composites having variable filler loadings and products produced thereby
US5040588 *Nov 10, 1988Aug 20, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethods for forming macrocomposite bodies and macrocomposite bodies produced thereby
US5090999 *Dec 21, 1990Feb 25, 1992Nippon Centronix, Ltd.Process for the removal of non-ferrous metals from solid ferrous scrap
US5119864 *May 9, 1990Jun 9, 1992Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming a metal matrix composite through the use of a gating means
US5141819 *Feb 19, 1991Aug 25, 1992Lanxide Technology Company, LpMetal matrix composite with a barrier
US5150747 *Mar 18, 1991Sep 29, 1992Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming metal matrix composites by use of an immersion casting technique and product produced thereby
US5163498 *Nov 7, 1989Nov 17, 1992Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming metal matrix composite bodies having complex shapes by a self-generated vacuum process, and products produced therefrom
US5163499 *May 9, 1990Nov 17, 1992Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming electronic packages
US5165463 *May 9, 1990Nov 24, 1992Lanxide Technology Company, LpDirectional solidification of metal matrix composites
US5172747 *May 20, 1991Dec 22, 1992Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming a metal matrix composite body by a spontaneous infiltration technique
US5188164 *Jul 31, 1990Feb 23, 1993Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming macrocomposite bodies by self-generated vacuum techniques using a glassy seal
US5197528 *Apr 29, 1991Mar 30, 1993Lanxide Technology Company, LpInfiltration of matrix melts with fillers and cooling
US5224533 *May 22, 1992Jul 6, 1993Lanxide Technology Company, LpSealing and heating to form matrices
US5238045 *Apr 1, 1991Aug 24, 1993Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of surface bonding materials together by use of a metal matrix composite, and products produced thereby
US5240062 *Jun 8, 1992Aug 31, 1993Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of providing a gating means, and products thereby
US5247986 *Jan 21, 1992Sep 28, 1993Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming macrocomposite bodies by self-generated vacuum techniques, and products produced therefrom
US5267601 *Nov 25, 1991Dec 7, 1993Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod for forming a metal matrix composite body by an outside-in spontaneous infiltration process, and products produced thereby
US5277989 *Aug 24, 1992Jan 11, 1994Lanxide Technology Company, LpMetal matrix composite which utilizes a barrier
US5280819 *Feb 25, 1992Jan 25, 1994Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethods for making thin metal matrix composite bodies and articles produced thereby
US5287911 *May 14, 1992Feb 22, 1994Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod for forming metal matrix composites having variable filler loadings and products produced thereby
US5298283 *Dec 13, 1991Mar 29, 1994Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod for forming metal matrix composite bodies by spontaneously infiltrating a rigidized filler material
US5301738 *Feb 24, 1992Apr 12, 1994Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of modifying the properties of a metal matrix composite body
US5303763 *Nov 23, 1992Apr 19, 1994Lanxide Technology Company, LpDirectional solidification of metal matrix composites
US5311919 *Dec 21, 1992May 17, 1994Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming a metal matrix composite body by a spontaneous infiltration technique
US5316069 *Dec 5, 1991May 31, 1994Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of making metal matrix composite bodies with use of a reactive barrier
US5329984 *May 7, 1993Jul 19, 1994Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming a filler material for use in various metal matrix composite body formation processes
US5350004 *May 9, 1991Sep 27, 1994Lanxide Technology Company, LpRigidized filler materials for metal matrix composites and precursors to supportive structural refractory molds
US5361824 *Jun 9, 1993Nov 8, 1994Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod for making internal shapes in a metal matrix composite body
US5377741 *Oct 13, 1993Jan 3, 1995Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming metal matrix composites by use of an immersion casting technique
US5482778 *Jan 10, 1994Jan 9, 1996Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of making metal matrix composite with the use of a barrier
US5487420 *May 4, 1994Jan 30, 1996Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod for forming metal matrix composite bodies by using a modified spontaneous infiltration process and products produced thereby
US5500244 *Mar 28, 1994Mar 19, 1996Rocazella; Michael A.Method for forming metal matrix composite bodies by spontaneously infiltrating a rigidized filler material and articles produced therefrom
US5501263 *Jan 8, 1993Mar 26, 1996Lanxide Technology Company, LpMacrocomposite bodies and production methods
US5505248 *Jul 28, 1994Apr 9, 1996Lanxide Technology Company, LpBarrier materials for making metal matrix composites
US5518061 *Feb 22, 1994May 21, 1996Lanxide Technology Company, LpAftertreatment, infiltration of aluminum melt
US5526867 *Jun 6, 1995Jun 18, 1996Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethods of forming electronic packages
US5529108 *May 9, 1991Jun 25, 1996Lanxide Technology Company, LpThin metal matrix composites and production methods
US5531260 *Dec 29, 1994Jul 2, 1996Lanxide Technology CompanyMethod of forming metal matrix composites by use of an immersion casting technique and products produced thereby
US5541004 *Sep 9, 1994Jul 30, 1996Lanxide Technology Company, LpMetal matrix composite bodies utilizing a crushed polycrystalline oxidation reaction product as a filler
US5544121 *Jun 5, 1995Aug 6, 1996Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaSemiconductor memory device
US5585190 *Jan 24, 1994Dec 17, 1996Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethods for making thin metal matrix composite bodies and articles produced thereby
US5618635 *Mar 27, 1995Apr 8, 1997Lanxide Technology Company, LpAluminum metal matrix comprising embedded ceramic filler and aluminum nitride
US5620804 *Jun 7, 1993Apr 15, 1997Lanxide Technology Company, LpMetal matrix composite bodies containing three-dimensionally interconnected co-matrices
US5638886 *Nov 22, 1995Jun 17, 1997Lanxide Technology Company, LpForming permeable mass by mixing powdered matrix metals and non-reactive filler; infiltration; cooling
US5848349 *Jun 25, 1993Dec 8, 1998Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of modifying the properties of a metal matrix composite body
US5851686 *Aug 23, 1996Dec 22, 1998Lanxide Technology Company, L.P.Gating mean for metal matrix composite manufacture
EP0045002A1 *Jul 13, 1981Feb 3, 1982Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki KaishaMethod for making composite material using oxygen
EP0045510A1 *Aug 3, 1981Feb 10, 1982Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki KaishaMethod for production of composite material using preheating of reinforcing material
EP0184604A1 *Apr 18, 1985Jun 18, 1986Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki KaishaProcess for manufacturing alloy including fine oxide particles
EP0368787A1 *Sep 28, 1989May 16, 1990Lanxide Technology Company, Lp.A method of forming metal matrix composites by use of an immersion casting technique and products produced thereby
EP0409763A2 *Jul 16, 1990Jan 23, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpA method of forming metal matrix composite bodies by a self-generated vacuum process
EP0427658A2 *Jul 16, 1990May 15, 1991Lanxide Technology Company, LpMethod of forming metal matrix composite bodies by a self-generated vacuum process, and products produced therefrom
EP0666247A1 *Jan 25, 1995Aug 9, 1995Schunk Kohlenstofftechnik GmbHCarbon or graphite material impregnated with metal
Classifications
U.S. Classification164/97, 164/136, 428/545, 164/77, 164/409, 249/137, 164/63, 428/567
International ClassificationC04B41/51, C04B41/45, C04B41/88, B22F3/26
Cooperative ClassificationC04B41/88, B22F3/26, C04B41/51, C04B41/009
European ClassificationC04B41/00V, C04B41/51, C04B41/88, B22F3/26