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Publication numberUS3397495 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 20, 1968
Filing dateJan 19, 1966
Priority dateJan 19, 1966
Publication numberUS 3397495 A, US 3397495A, US-A-3397495, US3397495 A, US3397495A
InventorsCable Daniel K, Thompson William J
Original AssigneeAngeles Metal Trim Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Partition wall with yieldable cap members
US 3397495 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 20, 1968 w. J. THOMPSON ET AL 3,397,495

PARTITION WALL WITH YIELDABLE CAP MEMBERS Filed Jan. 19, 1966 W of a. 6m W Mam M ZW A M 2 Wm w United States Patent 3,397,495 PARTITION WALL WITH YIELDABLE CAP MEMBERS William J. Thompson, Burlingame, and Daniel K. Cable, Lakewood, Calif., assignors to Angeles Metal Trim Co., Los Angeles, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Jan. 19, 1966, Ser. No. 521,588 Claims. (Cl. 52241) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The present invention includes a metal cap to be disposed over the top of a dry-wall partition against an overlying ceiling to position the top of the partition, the cap having yieldable depending outer flanges which slope downward and inward for frictionally receiving the upper outer edge portions of upstanding wallboard slabs, the cap also having depending inwardly disposed downwardly and outwardly sloping walls forming tapered pockets with the outer flanges to receive the upper ends of the wallboard slabs in tension when the wallboard slabs are in vertical position.

This invention relates to dry wall partitions capable of being readily installed in, and also to being readily removed from, large commercial installations. More particularly, the invention relates to metal caps employed at the tops of such partitions for receiving the tops of wallboard slabs used in the partitions and also receiving the tops of wall studs, including metal studs, constituting supports in the partitions.

One object of the invention is to provide metal caps for such partitions which position the upper edge portions of the wallboard slabs and which include spring flange portions to hold the upper slab portions under tension.

Another object is to provide metal caps for such dry wall partitions which may be secured to overlying ceilings at the tops of the partitions and which serve to position the tops of the partitions and the tops of wallboard slabs with respect to the ceilings.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a shaped metal cap for such dry wall partitions which may be secured to an overlying ceiling to position the top of such a partition, including the upper edge portions of wallboard slabs of the partition, the cap having depending flanges frictionally receiving and engaging upper edge portions of such slabs in spaced relation to the ceiling so that the ceiling, under varying loads, may rise or fall with respect to the partition and its wallboard slabs, without tendency to affect the relation of the partition and its slabs at the floor on which the partition rests.

An additional object is to provide a combination of a metal partition cap, of the indicated nature, with an underlying floor-contacting track providing means for freely receiving the lower edge portions of a wallboard slab above the floor level while being installed, without the necessity for employing a floor jack to force the slab upward into installed position.

Another important object is to provide metal caps for dry wall partitions of building structures which will render it relatively easy to install wallboards whose lower ends are to be supported in elevated positions on floor tracks mounted upon the building floors carrying the partitions.

Other objects of the invention and various features of construction thereof will become apparent to those skilled in this art, upon reference to the following specification and the accompanying drawing forming a part hereof.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is fragmentary perspective view, wherein various portions are broken away to facilitate disclosure, indicating a dry wall partition constructed in accordance with 3,397,495 Patented Aug. 20, 1968 this invention and particularly showing the novel wall cap hereof positioned at the top of the wall;

FIG. 2 is a vertical transverse section showing the wall construction of FIG. 1, portions being broken out for the purpose again of facilitating disclosure;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary detail indicating how the top of a wallboard is fitted into position in a pocket provided at one side of the wall cap during installation of the wallboard;

FIG. 4 is a vertical section of a modification of the cap construction at the top of the wall; and

FIG. 5 is a view similar to that of FIG. 3 indicating how the top of the wallboard slab is initially inserted into the wall cap during installation.

.With reference to the construction shown especially in FIGS. 1 and 2, a dual element cap 10 of this invention is illustrated in an operative position at the top of a dry wall partition which employs studs, preferably metalstuds 12, above which the cap 10 is disposed and in line with which the inner element thereof is placed. The lower ends of the studs 12 are shown as mounted upon a so-called floor track 14 which is constructed to support the lower ends of the wallboards 15 in a suitably spaced position above the floor F carrying the partition wall.

The dual element cap 10 includes two elements, of which one element 16 is an outer overlying cap member 16, and the other of which is an inner depending cap member 18 positioned to span the upper ends of the various metal studs 12 used along the wall.

More particularly, the upper, large cap element 16 is in the form of an elongated downwardly faced channel member which includes an elongated main wall or web 20, sometimes referred to as a cap wall, extending the length of the wall construction. The side edges of the cap wall or web 20 integrally carry depending relatively narrow flanges 22 running lengthwise thereof and carry at their lower edges, if desired, inwardly directed or re-entrant narrow flange lips 24. The inner and narrower cap element 18 includes a longitudinally extending web 25 disposed in parallel relation with the web 20 and integrally or rigidly secured thereto as by clinching or spot welding at 26 adjacent knockout holes 27. Depending from the edge portions of the web 25 of the inner cap element 18 are longitudinally directed flanges 28 extending appreciably below the flanges 22 of the cap element 16. These flanges 28 snugly engage the outer sides of the metal studs 12 when in operative position.

In the form of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1, 2, and 3, the upper edges of the flanges 28 are integrally joined by ledges 32 to sloping connector walls 30 which extend inwardly as they extend upward. The sloping walls are integrally joined to the edges of the Web 25. As shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, the sloping connector walls 30 lie inwardly of the flanges 28, and these longitudinally extending portions 28 and 30 are integrally connected by longitudinally extending horizontally disposed ledges 32.

Commonly, the dual element cap 10 is positioned directly above an assembled partition wall and secured to a ceiling 33 or overlying flooring as by nailing 34. Since it is ordinarily desired to provide for some sagging of such ceiling or flooring 33 when overloaded, the dual element cap 10 is located in a position spaced somewhat above the wallboards 15 and the studs 12 when in normally assembled relationship, this relation being particularly illustrated in FIG. 2.

The studs 12 employed in this wall structure may conform in general with conventional wooden studs which are approximately 2" x 4" in cross-section. Here, the metal studs 12 described are commonly made from galvanized sheet steel which may approximate 1 /8" x 3%",

for example, but are in channel form as illustrated rather than 'solid' in cross-section. Thus, these metal studs 12 include an upstanding web or main wall 35, integral laterally directed vertical flanges 36 constituting the sides of the studs, and also including in-turned stifiening flanges 38 which however are relatively narrow.

In assembling the described partition Wall, the lower ends of the studs 12 are rested upon the bottom wall 40 of the previously mentioned floor track 14. This bottom wall 40 is secured to the floor F as by nails 41 and may be directly mounted upon appropriate shims 42 Where the floor F is uneven. Such shims 42 may be in small sections or substantially continuous as may be required by the floor. At the sides of the bottom wall 40 of the floor track 14, upstanding flanges 44 are integrally provided and extend longitudinally the length of the wall in general correspondence with the longitudinal extension of the dual element cap 10. At the upper edges of the flanges 44, in-turned ledges 45 are integrally connected with the flanges 44 and extend inwardly a distance to contact the sidewalls or flanges 36 of the studs 12. At this location, the ledges 45 are provided with upstanding integral flanges 46. These ledges 45 are thus disposed in horizontal position and have widths conforming with the thickness of the lower ends of the wallboards 15. In order fully to stabilize the ledges 45 to provide adequate seats for support of the wallboards 15, the flanges 46 are usually secured to the sidewalls 36 of the studs 12 as by means of spot welds 48 or screws 49, or they may be held in place in other ways.

In order properly to secure the wallboard slabs 15 to the studs 12, self-threading screws 50 may be driven into the wallboards 15 and through the opposing sides 36 of the studs 12 whereby to secure the wallboards against the studs in a stabilized relation, as illustrated. Where the heads of the screws 50 are to be concealed, joint cement and adhesive tape (as at 52) may be used, or other means employed as may be desired. Further, the wallboards may be applied to the studs by adhesive cement. Also, the joints at the ledges 45 between the lower edges of the wallboards 15 and the tops of the flanges 44 of the floor tracks 14 may be concealed by suitable baseboards 55, the lower edges of which may rest upon the floor F in properly spaced position relative to the wallboards 15 and flanges 44 insured by inwardly directed flanges 56. These baseboards may be secured by means of self-threading screws 58 extending through the lower portions of the wallboards 15 and also through the adjacent flanges 46 of the floor track 14 and flanges 36 of the studs 12. For the specific purpose of covering the screwheads 58, narrow flexible plastic strips 60 may be used which snap into corresponding channels provided in the baseboards 55 by overhanging lips 62.

In practicing the invention, the new dual element cap of this invention particularly provides for the easy installation of wallboards in dry wall construction of partitions of the indicated nature. This is pertinent to partitions of this character which are also known as dry wall demountable partitions. Such partitions are so termed because they may be quickly installed in large areas for the purpose of converting such areas into small display rooms, or oflices, or the like, and can later be readily removed, as by dismantling, and be again emrendering them unfit for further use. This track structure is described and claimed in patent application Ser; No.

ployed in constructing similar partitions elsewhere. Also,

caps 10 may be used on permanent walls or partitions.

The dual element cap structure for such walls is also quite valuable in these demountable dry wall partitions,

especially where the floor track 14, or similar track,-pro- 519,582, filed on Jan. 10, 1966 by Leo Joseph Lizee, assignor to Angcles Metal Trim Company.

Employing the present invention in the latter connection, it is a simple matter, when the described floor track 14 is assembled with the described. studs 12 and the dual element cap 10 hereof, to introduce the upper end of a wallboard 15 of appropriate length into the pocket P which is provided between the outer flange 22 of the upper element 16 and the flange 28 and slopping wall 30 of the inner element 18. With this arrangement, as will be noted, the upper part of the pocket P is much wider than the vertical passageway provided between the flanges 22 and 28. Thus, the top of the wallboard 15 may be readily introduced upwardly into the pocket P merely by moving the lower end of the wallboard 15 outwardly to dispose the board at an angle such as that indicated in FIG. 3, and then swinging the lower end of the wallboard 15 into the position seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, where such lower end slides onto the seat on the respective ledge 45 as illustrated in FIG. 2.

When the wallboard is in vertical position, its upper end having been lifted upwardly in the pocket P, the wallboard 15 then readily settles into its seat on the ledge 45. Additionally, the upper element 16, being constructed of galvanized steel sheet which has considerable springiness, permits the initial set of each flange 22 to be arranged with its lower end tipped inwardly at an angle as seen in FIGS. 3 and 5. When the respective wallboard slab 15 is moved into the vertical position of FIGS. 1 and 2, the flange 22 is sprung outwardly into vertical position in parallel contact with the outer wall of wallboard 15 as indicated in FIGS. 1, 2 and 4, thus insuring a good frictional contact between the wallboard and the depending flanges 22 and 28 of the cap 10. Incidentally, since the inner cap member 18 is normally made of the same galvanized sheet steel as that employed in the outer member 16, the flange parts 28, 30, of the inner member may also be given an initial inward set so that the lowermost flanged portion 28, when disposed at opposite sides of the studs 12 is in parallel relationship to such studs and in firm frictional contact with the walls thereof. Thus, a tight, snug, frictional joint is insured between the top of the wallboard 15 and the respective dual element cap 10.

The stepped structure of the inner cap element 18 shown in FIGS. 1, 2, and 3, enables the :provision of the pocket P which is otherwise wider at the top for a given slope of the connector strips 30. Also, the ledges 32 have the further advantage of acting as stops to limit the sagging of the overhead ceiling or floor from overload, should such overload occur.

Where a permanent relationship is desired to be maintained between the ceiling 33 and the tops of the studs 12 and the wallboards 15, the flanges 28 and the sidewalls 36 of the studs 12 may be permanently connected in the desired relationship with the ledges 32 determining the proper spacing, and such relationship maintained as by screws 65 or spot-welding 65a as indicated in FIGS. 1, 3, and 4. Should it be desired to forego the advantages above indicated for the ledges 32, these may be omitted, as indicated in FIGS. 4 and 5, the sloping connecting portions 30, extending directly from the edges of the webs 25 to the upper edges of the flanges 28 as illustrated. Here, pockets P may be given the same width construction of FIGS. 4 and 5 as with the construction of the other figures, by increasing the slope of the connectors 30. Otherwise, the tops of the pockets P will be narrower and aiford less working space for manipulation of the wallboards 15 when being installed. In the case of the sloping arrangement of connectors 30' in FIGS. 4 and 5, depending flanges 28 may be rigidly connected with the side flanges 36 of the studs 12 by the screws 65, welds 65a, or other means, or such rigid connection may be omitted as in FIG. 5 whereby to provide for automatic vertical adjustment between the dual element cap and the studs 12 as the overlying ceiling 33 may yield under overload.

From the foregoing description it will be apparent that this invention provides a horizontal cap structure for overlying a dry wall partition and which facilitates easy installation of wallboards 15 by reason of the pockets P. To this end the pockets P are wider at the top and extend downwardly an appreciable distance between the lower edges of the outer flanges 22. It will be noted that, in the form of cap structure illustrated, the lower ends of the pockets P as defined by the ledges 32 or the bottoms of the connector strips 30 lie at a position below the flanges 22 a distance approximately equal to half the depth of the pockets P. It will also be observed that such means provides for the easy insertion of wallboards 15 into proper positions against the studs 12 of dry wall partitions of the indicated demountable type or permanent or movable types, and that this is especially true where floor-track ledges, such as the ledges 45, are located at a somewhat elevated position above the floor to receive the lower ends of the wallboards 15 for whatever purpose desired, such as protecting such lower ends against water accumulating from mopping, flooding or other conditions.

The invention claimed is:

1. In a metal cap for the top of a dry wall structure which has an upstanding metal stud:

an elongated normally horizontal cap wall adapted to overlie the top of a metal stud of a partition in position adjacent to a ceiling of a room;

an outer yielding flange depending downwardly and inwardly from an edge of said horizontal cap wall to engage the outer side of the upper end portion of a wallboard upstanding alongside said stud;

a cooperating horizontal wall member extending longitudinally of said cap wall and secured thereto in rigid parallel relation therewith;

a connecting member depending from said cooperating wall member and spaced inward from said outer flange and toward the locus of said stud and providing an inward pocket to receive the upper end portion of said wallboard in tipped relation during installation;

and an inner flange depending from said connecting member and spaced inwardly from said outer flange for engaging an inner wall of said wallboard when installed and for engaging an opposed side wall of said stud.

2. A metal cap as in claim 1 wherein said connecting member includes an inwardly directed ledge joining the top of said inner flange and a lower inner portion of said connecting member, thereby enlarging said pocket.

3. A metal cap as in claim 1 wherein said connecting member extends at a slope from the top of said inner flange inwardly and upwardly to the adjacent edge of said cooperating wall member and forms an enlarged top portion of said pocket.

4. A metal cap as in claim 1 wherein said inner flange depends below said outer flange and in inwardly spaced relation therefrom, providing an outwardly and downwardly directed entrance slot for the top of a wallboard being installed.

5. In a metal cap for the top of a dry wall which has upstanding metal. studs;

an elongated normally horizontal cap wall to overlie the tops of studs of the dry wall in position adjacent a room ceiling;

elongated yieldable outer flanges depending from the opposite edges of said cap wall and sloped downwardly and inwardly to engage the outer sides of upper end portions of wallboards upstanding along the sides of said studs;

a cooperating elongated horizontal wall member narrower than said cap wall and disposed parallel to said cap wall in rigid relation thereto;

integral elongated connecting members depending downward and outward from opposite edges of said cooperating wall member to provide pockets wider at their tops with narrower entrance slots at their hottoms for receiving the tops of wallboards being installed and permit swinging movement of such wallboards being installed;

and elongated inner flanges depending from said connecting members and disposed in inwardly spaced relation from said outer flanges to engage inner walls of said wallboards when installed and to depend alongside said sides of said studs.

6. A metal cap as in claim 5 wherein narrow horizontal ledges are disposed between the tops of said inner flanges and lower portions of said connecting members to overlie side portions of said studs.

7. In combination in a building structure:

an overhead horizontal ceiling;

a floor parallel to said ceiling;

a vertical dry wall partition between said ceiling and said floor and including upstanding studs and wallboards secured to sides of said studs;

an upwardly facing channeled floor track having a main wall borne on said floor, the lower ends of said studs resting upon said main wall of said floor track;

said track including horizontal. ledges elevated above said floor and supporting the lower ends of said wallboards above said floor;

and a wall cap horizontally disposed along the top of said partition and including two channeled downwardly facing horizontally disposed members, one member being wider than the other and overlying the other, each member having a horizontal main wall rigidly attached to the other main wall, the wider cap member having at its edges depending outer flanges sloped downwardly and inwardly and engaging the outer walls of said wallboards, and the narrower cap member having inner flanges depending below said outer flanges in inwardly spaced relation from said outer flanges and having lower portions engaging the inner walls of the tops of said wallboards, said inner flanges having upper portions extending upwardly and inwardly from the tops of said lower portions and thereby providing inwardly extending pockets having inward portions to receive the tops of said wallboards when the lower ends of said boards are swung first outwardly and then inwardly in mounting the lower ends of said boards on said floor track ledges.

8. A combination as in claim 7 wherein said wall cap is secured to said ceiling in slightly suspended relation above said studs and boards.

9. In a cap for the top of a dry wall structure which has an upstanding stud:

an elongated normally horizontal upper cap member adapted to overlie the top of a stud of a partition in position adjacent to a ceiling;

outer flanges depending from edges of said horizontal cap member to engage outer sides of upper end portions of wallboards upstanding alongside said stud;

cooperating members extending longitudinally of the cap member and secured thereto in rigid relation therewith;

elongated inner flanges depending from said cooperating members in parallelism with said outer flanges, and spaced inwardly from such outer flanges for engaging side walls of said stud;

and integral elongated connecting members extending downward between said cooperating members and the corresponding inner flanges and disposed farther inward toward the locus of said stud than said inner flanges and sloping inwardly and upwardly thereby providing upwardly tapered inward pockets between said downwardly extending connecting members and ing.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Roberston 5 2-241 Nelsson 52-242 X Zinn 52-241 Zinn- 52241 8 FOREIGN PATENTS 687,944 6/1964 Canada. 273,256 9/1964 Netherlands.

5 OTHER REFERENCES Hauserman Publication, movable steel master walls, pp. C414, C415, Sweets Architectural Catalog.

FRANK L. ABBO'IT, Primary Examiner.

10 C. G. MUELLER, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3629984 *May 19, 1970Dec 28, 1971Richardson CletusModular panel wall system
US3744199 *Oct 9, 1970Jul 10, 1973Prudent O BlanckeDemountable wall partition
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US7681365Apr 4, 2008Mar 23, 2010James Alan KleinHead-of-wall fireblock systems and related wall assemblies
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US8499512Dec 1, 2008Aug 6, 2013California Expanded Metal Products CompanyExterior wall construction product
US8555566Apr 8, 2013Oct 15, 2013California Expanded Metal Products CompanyTwo-piece track system
US8590231Mar 21, 2012Nov 26, 2013California Expanded Metal Products CompanyFire-rated joint system
US8595999Jul 27, 2012Dec 3, 2013California Expanded Metal Products CompanyFire-rated joint system
US8640415Apr 8, 2011Feb 4, 2014California Expanded Metal Products CompanyFire-rated wall construction product
US8671632Jan 11, 2013Mar 18, 2014California Expanded Metal Products CompanyWall gap fire block device, system and method
US8793947Oct 11, 2012Aug 5, 2014California Expanded Metal Products CompanyFire-rated wall construction product
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WO2007103331A2 *Mar 6, 2007Sep 13, 2007William J AndrewsFire rated wall structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/241, 52/773
International ClassificationE04B2/82
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/825
European ClassificationE04B2/82C