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Publication numberUS3398411 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 27, 1968
Filing dateNov 21, 1966
Priority dateNov 21, 1966
Publication numberUS 3398411 A, US 3398411A, US-A-3398411, US3398411 A, US3398411A
InventorsJohn Douglass
Original AssigneeAffiliated Hospital Prod
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bedsprings
US 3398411 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 27, 1968 J. DoUGLAss BEDSFRINGS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 2l, 1966 INVENTOR OUGLASS ATTORNEY JOH mk www NOE Aug. 27, 1968 J. DoUGLAss BEDSPRINGS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 2l. 1966 INVENTOR www UGLASS 919; ATTORNEY United States Patent Office 3,398,411 Patented Aug. 27, 196s ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE A bedspring having a frame with a back section and thigh section hingedly connected thereto. A thrust tube connects to the back section below its hinged aXis and swings the back section with respect to the frame. Three links interconnect the back and thigh sections so that the thigh section can be raised simultaneously with the back section, the last link being disengageable from the thigh section so that the back section can be raised independently. A foot section is hingedly connected to the thigh section and is provided with rollers which engage tracks on the frame. A modified form of the invention has legs swingably connected to the back section for engaging the frame and holding the back section in a horizontal position. A trip plate is rotatively mounted on the frame for camming the legs away from the frame so that the back section can be optionally depressed into a Trendelenburg position. A rod at the foot end of the frame operates the trip plate.

This invention relates to hospital beds and, more particularly, to bedsprings for such beds.

The present invention resides in a single action bedspring having a disengageable linkage interconnecting the back and thigh sections so that the back section can be raised either independently or simultaneously with the thigh and leg sections. Moreover, at the foot of the bed the frame is provided with a pair of upstanding tracks which engage support rollers journaled to the foot end of the leg section so as to avoid marring the finish of the frame. A modified form of the present invention includes a release mechanism which when actuated allows the back section of the spring to depress into the Trendelenburg position. This release mechanism is actuated from the foot of the bed so that the nurse or other individual attending the patient in the bed need not come to the side of the bed to trip the mechanism.

Conventional hospital bedspringsV generally employ two actuating mechanisms which are either electrically or manually operated, one of the mechanisms being adapted to raise the back section of the spring, while the other is adapted to raise the thigh and leg sections independently of the back section. Where manually operated actuating mechanisms are employed, two hand cranks are usually provided at the foot of the bed for raising and lowering the aforementioned spring sections. Heretofore, `so-called single-action bedsprings which employ only one actuating mechanism to raise both the back and thigh sections have experienced only limited acceptance even though they require fewer moving parts and are therefore less expensive than those of the present invention. These singleaction bedsprings of current manufacture, however, are not ideally suited for bedridden patients since the thigh and leg sections necessarily rise and depress with the back section when the single actuating mechanism is actuated. Accordingly, if the patient desires to sit up in bed, his legs must also be raised. The present bedspring overcomes this disadvantage for it is provided with a unique disengageable linkage interconnecting the back and thigh sections. Thus, the back section can be optionally raised independently of the thigh section, and the patient can sit up in bed while still having his legs disposed horizontally along the mattress.

The leg sections of hospital bedsprings of current manufacture are generally swingably connected at their forward ends to their respective thigh sections and are provided at their opposite or extreme foot ends with support rollers which ride on the upwardly presented surfaces of the bed frames as the thigh and leg sections move through various angulated positions. In time, such rollers crack or otherwise mar the painted finish on such frames, leaving an unsightly appearance and subjecting the frame to possible corrosion. The support rollers on the leg sections of the present invention, however, ride on upstanding tracks which are rigidly fastened to the frame. Accordingly, the rollers do not engage the frame and therefore cannot mar its finish.

Furthermore, so-called Trendelenburg springs generally employ some sort of release mechanism for permitting the back section to depress below its normal or horizontal position. Such release mechanisms are located at the head end of the beds, and accordingly the nurse or other person attending to the patient must walk to the head end of the bed to manipulate the mechanism. The present invention eliminates this inconvenience by providing an actuating element for the Trendelenburg release mechanism at the foot end of the bed adjacent the hand crank for the back section.

Among the several objects of the present invention may be noted the provision of a hospital bedspring in which the back and thigh sections thereof are actuated by a single actuating mechanism; the provision of a bedspring of the type stated in which the back section can be optionally raised independently of thigh and' leg sections; the provision of a bedspring of the type stated in which the support rollers for the leg section will not mar the finish on the frame; the provision of a bedspring in which the back section can be lowered into the Trendelenburg position from the operators position at the foot end of the bed; and the provision of a bedspring of the type stated which is attractive in appearance, rugged in construction, and economical to manufacture. Other objects and features will be in part apparent and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the constructions hereinafter described, the scope of the invention being indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which several of various possible embodiments of the invention are illustrated,

FIG. l is a perspective view of a bed having a bedspring constructed in accordance with and embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the bedspring;

FIGS. 3, 4, and 5, are sectional views taken along lines 3 3, 4 4, and 5 5, respectively, of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along line 6 6 of FIG. 2 and showing the drive link in its disengaged position;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary sectional view showing the back and thigh sections in an inclined position;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view showing the back section in an inclined position and the thigh section in a horizontal position;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a modified form of bedspring having its back section in a horizontal position;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary plan view showing the forward end of a modified form of bedspring;

FIG. ll is a fragmentary plan view of the foot end of the modified form of bedspring; and

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary elevational view partially broken away and in section of the modified form of bedspring, the back section being inclined below its horizontal position.

Corresponding reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings..

Referring now to the drawings, 2 `designates a hospital bed having a headboard 4, a footboard 6, and a bedspring 8 which is of the so-called Gatch variety, although it should be understood that the present invention can be similarly incorporated into the so-called Trendelenburg type bedspring. Bedspring 8 includes a lower frame 10 having spaced parallel side rails or angles 12, 14, which are transversely connected near their ends by front and rear cross rails 15, 16. Side rails 12, 14, are disposed so that their horizontal anges are presented upwardly and directed inwardly while their vertical flanges are presented outwardly and extend downwardly. At their ends, side rails 12, 14, are conventionally fastened to head and footboards 4, 6, by any suitable means. Lower frame 10 provides subjacent support for an articulated upper frame 17 including a back or head section 18, a seat section 20, a thigh section 22, and a leg section 24.

As will be seen by reference to FIGS. 2 and 3, seat section 20 comprises a pair of channel-shaped seat supports 26, 28, having lower horizontal anges which are bolted or otherwise rigidly secured to the inwardly projecting horizontal flanges of side rails 12, 14. Securely fastened to and projecting longitudinally from the bight or webforming portions of seat supports 26, 28, are pairs of opposed journal brackets 30, 32, to which the ends of back and thigh sections 18, 22, respectively, are pivotally secured.

Back section 18 possesses a U-shaped configuration and includes spaced parallel side members 34, 36, which integrally merge adjacent headboard 4 into a transversely extending end member 38. Similarly, side members 34, 36, possess an L-shaped cross-sectional configuration and integrally include opposed inwardly directed horizontal flanges and depending outwardly presented vertical flanges, the former of which are substantially coplanar with the upper anges of seat supports 26, 28, while the latter are substantially coplanar with the vertical anges of side rails 12, 14. At their inner or free ends the vertical flanges of side members 34, 36, are journaled to brackets 30 at pins 39 so that the inclination of back section 18 with respect to lower frame 10 can be varied. Bolted to the inner ends of side members 34, 36, and also journaled about pins 39 are depending side plates 40, 42, which project downwardly and rearward adjacent the inner margins of side rails 12, 14, to a point below brackets 30 where they are transversely connected by a front torque tube 44 which is welded or otherwise rigidly secured thereto. Inter-mediate their ends side members 34, 36, are provided with downwardly extending legs 46 having horizontally presented inwardly turned shoes 48 which engage the upper horizontal anges of side rails 12, 14, and are coated with an elastomeric substance so as not to mar the nish thereon. Thus when in the horizontal or completely reclined position back section 18 is supported on lower frame 10 in upwardly spaced parallel relation thereto by means of brackets 30 and legs 46.

Thigh section 22 is similarly provided with L-shaped side members 50, 52, which also have horizontal upper and Vertical outer anges, the latter of which are journaled at their ends to brackets 32 by means of pins 54. Riveted to side members 50, 52, are depending side plates 56, 58, which are also carried on pins 54 as best seen in FIG. 2. Side plates 56, 58, extend downwardly adjacent the inner margins of side rails 12, 14, and terminate below brackets 32 slightly forwardly of pins 54 where they are transversely connected by means of a rear torque tube 60 which is welded or otherwise rigidly secured thereto. Beyond side plates 56, 58, side members 50, 52, are provided with short depending legs 61 which, like legs 46 engage the upper face of the horizontal flanges forming part of side rails 12, 14, and lend additional support to thigh section 4 22 when it is in the fully reclined position. Fastened to the vertical flanges at the opposite ends of side members 50, 52, are journal brackets 62 which project longitudinally beyond the end margins thereof where they are connected to leg section 24.

Referring again to FIG. 2, leg section 24 is U-shaped and also comprises side members 64, 66, which arcuately merge at the rear ends into an integral end member 68 located adjacent footboard 6, members 64, 66, and 68 all having an L-shaped cross-sectional configuration embodying integral horizontal upper and vertical outer flanges. At their forward end side members 64, 66, are swingably joined to brackets 62 by means of pins 70. Secured to the upper flanges of and interconnecting side members 64, 66, near their forward ends is a cross bar 72 which dips downwardly intermediate its ends so as to provide clearance below the upper surface of leg section 24.

Also journaled to brackets 62 by means of pins 74 located immediately below pins 70 are support arms 76, 78, having rollers rotatably connected to the opposite ends thereof on pins 82, each roller 80 being pro-vided with a V-shaped peripheral groove 84. It should be noted that arms 76, 78, are bent slightly inwardly intermediate their ends so that grooves 84 of rollers 80 are located immediately above the inner margins of the upper horizontal flanges of side rails 12, 14, where rollers 80 engage tracks 86, 88, which are secured to side rails 12, 14. Each of tracks 86, 88, includes an outwardly directed horizontal ange which is securely riveted to the underside of the horizontal upper iianges of its respective side rail 12 or 14. Moreover, each ange 90 integrally merges into a vertical rail 92 which projects upwardly beyond the horizontal liange of its respective side rail 12 or 14 and terminates at a substantially linear upper surface 94 adapted to engage peripheral groove =84 of support rollers 80. Tracks 86, 88, are preferably coated with a chromium, cadmium or other suitable electrolytic coating.

Intermediate their ends, support arms 76, 78, are connected by a cross bar 96 and moreover are relieved along their upper margins in the provision of a plurality of transversely aligned forwardly directed serrations 98. I ournaled to the vertical anges of side members 64, 66, at their forward ends in slightly outwardly spaced relation to support arms 76, 78, are leg section braces 100, 102, which are interconnected at their opposite ends by a cross rod 104 sized for insertion in serrations 98. Thus, the angular disposition of leg section 24 can be adjusted merely by lifting its rear end upwardly and allowing cross rod 104 to slide over serrations 98 until the desired angle is obtained. When leg section 24 is released at this point, rod 104 will fall into the particular pair of serrations 98 .at that location and will prevent leg section 24 from depressing. Finally, it should be noted that leg section 24 is tted with a mattress guard 106 which projects upwardly from end member 68 so as to prevent a mattress (not shown) Ifrom sliding 01T bedspring 8 when the various sections of upper Aframe 17 are in inclined positions.

Conventionally secured along its outer margin to the inwardly directed upper flanges of side members 34, 36, and end member 38, forming part of back section 18, seat supports 26, 28, forming part of seat section 20, side members 50, 52, forming part of thigh section 22, and side members 64, 66, and end member -68 forming part of leg section 24, is a conventional looped wire spring section 108 for supporting a mattress.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, back and thigh sections 18, 22, are raised and lowered by means of an actuating assembly including a mounting sleeve 122 which is fastened to rear cross rail 16 by a bracket 124 for limited pivoted movement with respect thereto. Internally, sleeve 122 is tted with a rigid thrust bushing 126 and extending through bushing 126 for rotatable movement therein is an actuating shaft 128. Rigidly fastened to shaft 128 on each side of bushing 126 are thrust collars 130, 132, and interposed between bushing 126 and collar 132 is a thrust bearing 134. Beyond collar 130 shaft 128 is threaded for engagement with a nut 136 which is fitted within the end of a longitudinally extending thrust tube 138 mounted telescopically within mounting sleeve 122. At its opposite end shaft 128 is fitted with a hand crank 140 conventionally located for rotation beyond footboard 6.

Thrust tube 138 extends forwardly adjacent side rail 12 and in the general vicinity of bracket 62 it bends downwardly so as to clear rear torque tube 60. Beyond torque tube 60, thrust tube 138 turns upwardly and terminates intermediate a pair of spaced parallel torque arms or tabs 142, which are welded or otherwise securely fastened to front torque tube 44, adjacent side plate 42, thrust tube 138 being hingedly secured to tabs 142 by means of a pin 144. Thus, when hand crank 140 is rotated in the proper direction, nut 136 will ride forward on the threads of shaft 128, causing thrust tube 138 to extend telescopically from mounting sleeve 122. Thrust tube 138, in turn, will exert a longitudinally directed force on back section 18 at torque tube 44 and thereby cause the back section 18 to swing upwardly away from lower frame 10 about pins 39.

Interconnectin-g back and thigh sections 18, 22, immediately below seat section 20, as will be seen by reference to FIGS. 5 through 8, is a connecting linkage assembly 150 which is carried on a fulcrum tube 152, fulcrum tube 152 encircling and being rotatably mounted on a transverly extending fulcrum shaft 154 secured at its ends to the vertical flanges of side rails 12, 14. Linkage assembly 150 includes a pair of connecting links 156, 158, which are apertured intermediate their ends for reception of fulcrum tube 152, to which they are welded in spaced parallel relation slightly inwardly from seat support 26. Journaled intermediate the upper ends of links 156, 158, by means of a pin 160 is a drive leg 162 having a webforming central or bight portion 164 which integrally merges into a pair of opposed longitudinally extending flanges 166, anges 166 being apertured at their forward ends for accommodation of pin 160. At the opposite end of drive leg 162, anges 166 extend between :a pair of rearwardly projecting torque arms or tabs 167 which are similar to tabs 142 and are welded or otherwise rigidly secured to rear torque tube 60 in spaced parallel relation at an angle :approximately -20 above the horizontal. interconnecting the ends of tabs 167 is a rigid cross pin 168 which fits within downwardly opening elongated cutouts 169 formed in anges 166 of drive leg 162, the cutouts having notch-forming arcuate rear margins 170 which are curved to conform to the contour of cross pin 168.

Iournaled intermediate the lower ends of connecting links 156, 158, on `a pin 172 is ia yoke 174 having an apertured bight portion which receives the threaded end of a transfer link or lbolt 176, bolt 176 being adjustably secured thereto `by a pair of nuts 178. The opposite end of bolt 176 is rigidly fitted with another yoke 180 which is journaled intermediate a pair of torque arms or tabs 182 by Imeans of a pin 183, tabs 182 being similar to tabs 142, 167, and being further welded or otherwise rigidly secured to torque tube 44 so as to project radially rearwardly therefrom in spaced parallel relation at approximately above the horizontal when back section 18 is in the fully reclined position.

Iournaled in the vertical flanges of side rails 12, 14, slightly to the rear of and below fulcrum shaft 154 are a pair of control rods 184, 185, the outer ends of which are lbent upwardly beyond side rails 12, 14, respectively, in

tion 164. The forwardly presented side face of trip -bar 190, at a point above sleeve 188, normally abuts against the surface of fulcrum tube 152 intermediate connecting links 156, 158. The geometry of trip bar 190, rod 184, -fulcrum tube 152, connecting links 156, 158, and drive leg 162 is such that when either lever 186 is moved rearwardly, trip ybar 190 Iwill move through a limited arc until its forward side face again abuts against fulcrum tube 152, this time at a point below sleeve 188. Simultaneously arcuate camming surface 192 will engage the underface of bight portion 164 and will lift drive leg 162 upwardly so that its elongated cut-outs 169 will clear cross pin 168,1as shown in FIG. 6.

In operation, hack section 18 can be actuated independently of thigh section 22 or the two sections can be actuated simultaneously depending on the position olf actuating levers 186. When actuating levers 186 are in the forward position, trip bar 190 will be free of drive leg 162 Iallowing the upper margins of elongated cut-outs 169 to ride on cross pin 168. When hand crank 140 is rotated in the appropriate direction, thrust tube 138 will extend from Imounting sleeve 122 and will exert a forwardly directed force on torque tube 44 thereby causing lback section 18 to swing upwardly about its pins 39. Contemporaneously, side plates 40, 42, and torque tube 44 will move forwardly through [an arc having its center at pins 39 and in so doing will carry bolt 176 forwardly also. Bolt 176 will rotate connecting -links 156, 158, about the axis defined by fulcrum shaft 154 which, in turn, forces drive leg 162 rearwardly. At a preselected point notchforming arcuate rear margins 170 of elongated cut-outs 169 will engage cross pin 168. Thereafter, further advancement of drive leg 162 will urge cross pin 168, rear torque tube 60, and lside plates 56, 58, rearwardly, causing thigh section 22 to pivot upwardly about pins 54 at brackets 32, seen in FIG. 7. As the rear end of thigh section 22 rises, leg section 24, journaled thereto at -bracket 62, will simultaneously rise and advance forwardly Aon track-s 86, 88. inasmuch as rollers 80 ride on tracks 86, 88, in upwardly spaced relation to side rails 12, 14, the painted finish on side rails 12, 14, will remain undisturbed. When hand crank 140 is turned in the 0pposite direction, the reverse sequence of events occurs.

Assuming again that back and thigh sections 18, 22, are in the fully reclined position it wil-l be noted that arcuate margins 17 0 are disposed slightly to the rear of cross pin 168, thereby freeing drive leg 162 for pivotal movement. Thus, when either of actuating levers 186 is moved rear- Iwardly, camming surface 192 of trip bar 190 will engage bight portion 164 of drive leg 162 and cam it upwardly into a position wherein the lower margins of flanges 166 will be disposed above cross pin 168, as illustrated in FIG. 6. Consequently, when hand crank 140 is again rotated and back section 18 rises, drive leg 162 will advance on camming surface 192 of trip -bar 190 instead of on cross pin 168 and imoreover arcuate margins 170 cannot engage cross pin 168. In other words, drive leg 162 merely rides over but does not engae cross pin 168. Thus thigh and leg sections 22, 24, remain in the fully reclined or horizontal position while back section 18 rises.

It should be noted that with modifications, well within the purview of a mechanic skilled in the art, actuating Y shaft 128 can be connected through suitable -gearing to a reversible electric motor in lieu of hand crank 140. Accordingly, upper frame 17 could be actuated by either the lbedridden patient or an aide merely by manipulating a switch.

Referring now to FIGS. 9 through l2, it is possible to provide a modified form of bedspring 200 which is very similar to bedspring 8 and includes a bottom frame 201 having side rails 202, 204, which are connected near their forward ends by a transversely extending cross rail 206 integrally including an upper horizontal ange 208 and a vertical forward ange 210. Rigidly bolted to the upper flanges of side rails 202, 204, are seat supports 212, 214, having opposed journal brackets 216 projecting forwardly therefrom. Pinned on journal brackets 216 is a U-shaped back section 218 having side members-220, 222, and depending side plates, 224, 226, the latter of which are interconnected by a torque tube 228 which, lin turn, is coupled to a thrust tube 230. It shouldbe noted that the web or bight portions of seat supports 212, 214, are somewhat taller than their counterparts 26, 28, on bedspring 8 so that back section 218 can be lowered beyond the normal horizontal position into so-called Trendelenburg positions. Thus, bedspring 200 is of the Trendelenburg variety. Swingably journaled to side members 220, 222, immediately above upper ange 208 of cross rail 206 by means of pins 231 are depending legs 232, 234, each integrally including an apertured vertical upper portion 236 which accommodates one of pins 231, an inwardly inclined intermediate section 238, a lower Avertical portion 240, and an inwardly turned foot portion 242 which is provided with an elastomeric shoe 244 so it will not mar the finish of cross railv206 engaged by it. IDiagonally interconnecting intermediate section 238 and the upper flange of side rail 202 is a coiled tension spring 246 which normally biases leg 234 against a stop 248.

Interconnecting legs 232, 234, so that they tmove rin unison is a cross bar 250 which is welded or otherwise suitably fastened at its ends to the lower vertical portions 240 of each of legs 232, 234.

Bedspring 200 is further provided with a trip assembly 251 including a mounting bracket 2'52 which is secured to upper flange 208 of cross rail 206 adjacent foot portion 242 of leg 234. Bracket 252 includes an upstanding tab 254 provided with a horizontal pin 256 to which a substantially triangular trip plate 258 is journaled for limited'rotation, trip plate 258 being marginally delined by a substantially linear forward margin 260, an upper camming margin 262, and a rear margin 264. Below pin 256, trip plate 258 is inwardly notched from forward margin 260 in the provision of an elongated cut-out 266 which fits around upper flange 208 of cross rail 206, its rear arcuate margin being located so that it will abut against the rear margin of flange 208 when forward margin 260 is presented vertically to the rear of foot portion 242 of leg 234, and thereby preclude further rotation. Connected at one end to trip plate 258, adjacent the juncture of camming margin 262 and rear margin 264 and at its other end of liange 208 in close proximity to pin 256, is an over-center spring 268 which biases trip plate 258 toward either a neutral position wherein forward margin 260 is presented vertically, as illustrated in FIG. 9, or a camming position wherein forward margin 260 engages -the upper surface of upper flange 208 and camming margin 262 projects forwardly beyond and in inclined relation to cross rail 206, as seen in FIG. 12.

Adjacent the juncture of forward margin 260 and rear margin 264 trip plate 2258 is apertured and fitted with a trip cable 270 which extends rearwardly along side rail 202 to a -trip rod 272 to which it is connected at its opposite end. Trip rod 272 is mounted for longitudinal slidable movement in frame 201, and terminates slightly beyond the end of frame 201 for convenient manipulation from the foot of the bed.

In use, trip plate 258 will normally be in the neutral position, and when in such position it is obvious that back section 218 can move from a horizontal position to various upward inclined-positions as thrust tube 230 is actuated. Although tension spring 246 urges legs 232, 234, rearwardly, stop 248 prevents misalignment of legs 232, 234, and accordingly foot portions 242 will always align with and engage the upper surface of flange 208 of cross rail 206 when back section 218 is lowered to the horizontal position so as to provide support for back section 218 in that position.

T o lower back section 218 below its horizontal position and into a Trendelenburg position, back section 218 must first be raised slightly by actuating thrust tube 230 until foot portion 242 of leg 232 is presented slightly above trip plate 258. At this point the individual operating the bed grasps trip rod 272 from his position behind the bed and pulls it outwardly thereby drawing cable 27 0 taut which, in turn, pulls trip plate 258 over into the camming position wherein camming margin 262 is disposed at an inclination over upper flange 208 -of cross rail 206. When back section 218 is lowered foot portion 242 will engage camming margin 262 and ride over and beyond it against the bias of tension spring 246 to various positions below the level of upper flange 208. Of course, when foot portion 242 is presented below the level of iiange 208 the back section will be reclined below the horizontal or will be in the Trendelenburg position which is desirable for certain types of therapy. Moreover, it is readily apparent from FIG. 12 that tension `spring 246 will draw the rear margin of lower vertical portion 240 of leg 232 against cross rail 206 once footip'ortion 242 has cleared camming margin 262.

Bedspring 200 can be brought back to its original position merely by actuating thrust tube 230 so as to raise back section 218 slightly above the horizontal and then lower it again. As back section 218 rises to the approximate horizontal position foot portion 242 will engage forward margin portion 260 projecting forwardly beyond cross rail 206. Continued advancement o'f back section 218 flips trip plate 258 over against the bias of overcenter spring 268 into the neutral position. Now when back section 218 is again lowered foot portions 242 of legs 232, 234, will again be free to engage the upper surface of flange 208 as previously described.

As illustrated in FIG. l1, bedspring 200 can be either the double or single action variety.

In view of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

As various changes could be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

1. A bedspring comprising a frame; a back section hingedly mounted on the frame for swinging movement about -a first hinge axis; a thigh section hingedly mounted on the frame for swinging movement about a second hinge axis; drive means connected to the back section in downwardly spaced relation from the rst hinge axis for raising the back section; and connecting means interconnecting the thigh and back sections and including a connecting link pivotally mounted for rotation about a fulcrum axis which is fixed with respect to the frame; a transfer link interconnecting the back section and the connecting link and a drive link interconnecting the connecting link and thigh section, the transfer and drive links being connected to the back and thigh sections below the rst and second hinge axes, respectively, Whereby the thigh section will move with the back section, the connecting means being adapted for disengaging the thigh section from the back section so that the back section can move independently of `the thigh section.

2. A bedspring comprising a frame, a back section hingedly mounted on the frame for swinging movement about a first hinge axis, a thigh section hingedly mounted on the frame for swinging movement about a second hinge axis, the first and second hinge axesbeing fixed with respect to the frame, a single drive means connected to the back section for moving it about the first hinge axis, and connecting means interconnecting the back and thigh sections for swinging the thigh section with respect to the frame simultaneously withr swinging movement of the back section, the connecting means optionally disengaging the thigh section from the back section so that the back section can move independently of the thigh section.

3. A Trendelenburg bedspring comprising a frame, a mattress-supporting section hingedly mounted on the frame for swinging movement about a hinge axis, support means swingably connected to the mattress-supporting section for engaging the ame in spaced relation to the hinge axis when the mattress-supporting section is lowered toward the frame so as to support the mattresssupporting section in a preselected position, and trip means shiftably mounted on the frame for optionally camming the support means away from the frame as the mattress-supporting section is lowered toward the frame, whereby the mattress-supporting section can be optionally lowered below the preselected position.

4. A -bedspring according to claim 3 wherein means are located at the foot end of the frame for shifting the trip means into a position where it will cam the support means away from engagement with the frame as the mattress-supporting section is lowered.

5. A bedspring according to claim 3 wherein the support means are legs depending from the mattress-supporting section and the trip means is a' trip plate rotatively mounted on the frame for movement from a rst position wherein it allows the legs to engage the frame to a second position wherein it cams the legs away from the frame so that the mattress-supporting section can be lowered below the preselected position.

6. A bedspring according to claim 5 wherein means are located at the foot end of the frame for moving the trip plate from its first position to its second position.

7. A bedspring comprising a frame, a thigh section hingedly mounted at its forward end on the frame for swinging movement about an axis fixed with respect to the frame, a leg section hingedly secured at its forward end to the rear end of the thigh section whereby the leg section will move upwardly and forwardly when the thigh section is raised from a horizontal to an inclined position, rollers on the rear end of the leg section, and tracks projecting upwardly from the frame beneath the leg section and being engaged by the rollers, whereby the leg section rides to-and-fro on the tracks and will not mar the finish on the frame.

8 A bedspring according to claim 7 in which the rollers are provided with peripheral grooves which receive the upwardly v{projecting tracks.

9. A bedspring according to claim 2 in which the connecting means is connected to the back and thigh sections in downwardly spaced relation to the rst and second hinge axes, respectively.

10. A bedspring according to claim 1 in which the transfer link is pivotally connected to the back section in downwardly spaced relation to the irst hinge axis and the drive link is connected to the thigh section in downwardly spaced relation to the second hinge axis.

11. A bedspring according to claim 10 in which the drive link is releasably connected to the thigh section.

12. A bedspring according to claim 11 in which the thigh section is provided with a -rigid cross pin located in downwardly spaced relation to the second hinge axis and the drive link is provided with a cut-out adapted to receive the cross pin; said bedspring being further characterized by trip means for engaging the drive link and moving the cut-out therein away from the cross pin so that the drive link can move independently of the thigh sect-ion.

13. A bedspring according to claim 12 in which the cut-out opens downwardly whereby the weight of the drive link maintains the cross pin in engagement with the margins of the cut-out, and in which the end margin of the cuteout conforms substantially to the contour of the cross pin so that when a longitudinally directed force is applied to the drive link the cut-out will retentively engage the cross pin.

14. A bedspring according to claim 12 in which the trip means includes a trip bar adapted to move from a first position wherein it remains free of the drive link to a second position where it engages the drive link and moves the cut-out away lfrom the cross pin.

15. A bedspring according to claim 14 in which the trip bar is mounted for rotational movement on a cross rod located in close proximity to the fulcrum rod, the side face of the trip bar being in abutment with the fulcrum rod when in both the iirst and second positions whereby the fulcrum rod limits the rotational movement of the trip bar.

16. A bedspring according to claim 2 and further characterized by a leg section hingedly secured at its forward end to the rear end of the thigh section whereby the leg section will move upwardly and forwardly when the thigh section is raised from a horizontal to an inclined position, and tracks secured to and projecting upwardly from the frame for engaging the rear end of the leg section whereby the leg section will not mar the finish of the frame as it moves forwardly thereon.

17. A bedspring according to claim 16 and further characterized by rollers mounted on the rear end of the leg section for engaging the upstanding tracks.

18. A bedspring according to claim 17 in which the rollers are provided with peripheral grooves which receive the upstanding tracks.

19. A bedspring according to claim 4 in which the support means comprises support legs depending from the back section, the legs being swingably mounted for movement from a supporting position wherein they will engage the frame when the back section is in a horizontal position so as to lend support thereto to nonsupporting positions wherein the back section can be lowered below the horizontal position.

20. A bedspring according to claim 19 in which the actuating means comprises a trip plate movable from a irst position wherein it allows the support legs to come into supporting engagement with the frame to a second position wherein it will cam the support legs into a non-supporting position as the back section is lowered from an upwardly reclined position, a trip rod located at and projecting beyond the foot end of the frame, and a cable interconnecting the trip rod and trip plate, whereby the position of the trip plate can be altered from the foot end of the bed.

21. A bedspring according to claim 20 in which the trip plate is mounted on the frame for rotational movement about a horizontal axis, and is marginally defined in part by a forward substantially linear margin and a camming margin, the substantially linear margin being presented substantially vertically above the frame when the trip plate is in the iirst position so that the support legs can be lowered into supporting engagement with the frame, the camming margin being located above and extending over a side margin of the frame when the trip plate is in the second position so as to cam the legs beyond the margin of the frame when the back section is lowered whereby the back section can depress below the horizontal; said bedspring being further characterized by an over-center spring interconnecting the frame and trip plate for maintaining the trip plate in either the rst or second position.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,191,196 6/1965 Holm 5-68 3,201,806 8/1965 Hui 5--66 X 3,220,021 1l/1965 Nelson 5--66 3,300,794 1/ 1967 Altorfer 5--68 3,323,145 6/ 1967 Willer, et al. 5-66 CASMIR A. NUNBERG, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3492679 *Feb 23, 1968Feb 3, 1970Hill Rom Co IncTrendelenburg control mechanism
US3665528 *Jul 28, 1970May 30, 1972Trioteam AsAdjustable bed
US3681792 *Mar 19, 1970Aug 8, 1972Hans KorberAdjustable beds
US4097940 *Nov 9, 1976Jul 4, 1978Hill-Rom Company, Inc.Hospital bed having automatic contour mechanism
US4385410 *Feb 9, 1981May 31, 1983Maxwell Products, Inc.Articulated adjustable bed having a single motor drive
US4559656 *Dec 28, 1982Dec 24, 1985Hill-Rom Company, Inc.Hospital bed with a weight-distributing lever system
US4945582 *May 10, 1989Aug 7, 1990Hausted, Inc.Patient transport apparatus including independently or simultaneously operable leg and backrest portions
US6230346 *Jun 10, 1999May 15, 2001Basic American Medical Products, Inc.Articulated bed incorporating a single motor drive mechanism
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US7058999 *Oct 22, 2003Jun 13, 2006Paramount Bed Co., Ltd.Electric bed and control apparatus and control method therefor
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Classifications
U.S. Classification5/618
International ClassificationA61G7/002, A61G7/015
Cooperative ClassificationA61G7/015
European ClassificationA61G7/015