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Publication numberUS3399468 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 3, 1968
Filing dateMay 5, 1966
Priority dateMay 8, 1965
Also published asDE1278885B
Publication numberUS 3399468 A, US 3399468A, US-A-3399468, US3399468 A, US3399468A
InventorsWalter Gahle
Original AssigneeRheinmetall Gmbh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spraying canister
US 3399468 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 3, 1968 w. GAHLE 3,399,468

SPRAYING CANISTER Filed May 5, 1 966 Inventor: Wa'ZZc I Gc'z'AZe/ 5y 44% 5% If [6% United States Patent 3,399,468 SPRAYING CANISTER Walter Giihlc, Unterluss-Hohenrieth, Germany, assignor to Firma Rheinmetall G.m.b.H., Dusseldorf, Germany Filed May 5, 1966, Ser. No. 547,862 Claims priority, application Germany, May 8,1965, R 40,581 6 Claims. (CI. 35-25) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A spraying canister for simulating the discharge of poison gases over terrain having a container to hold a mock gas with a detonator and a time-delay mechanism and a propellent and explosive charge to burst the container and spray out the contents thereof.

The invention relates to a spraying canister for simulating the discharge of poison gases over terrain, consisting of a container holding a training (or mock poison) gas, a detonator and time delay mechanism inserted into the lid of the container, a propellent charge for ejecting the spraying canister from a discharge cup, and an explosive chare for bursting the container and spraying out the contents.

, Spraying canisters of this type are known. They are used, on the one hand, to simulate grenades, rockets and bombs filled with poison gas and, on the other hand, the gaseous medium used, which generally consists of a neutral fluid, has to be detected in the countryside which is achieved by contacting it with a dispersed powder to colour it and make it very clearly visible.

Spraying canisters of this kind essentially consist of a 3 training gas container made of sheet steel (fitted with a detonator, propellent charge and explosive charge),

which can be shot out of a discharger cup, the explosive charge only igniting and destroying the container, thus spraying out the contents, when the container has reached a given height above the ground.

Since the fluid content of these canisters is about litres and the maximum height reached by the canister when shot from the discharger cup is about metres, it will be appreciated that quite stringent requirements have to be fulfilled as to the strength not only of the canister itself but also of the discharger cup.

In the case of the discharger cup, these requirements can be fulfilled relatively simply and cheaply by burying it in the earth almost up to the upper edge. This surrounding wall of earth is of great importance for the discharger cup containing the spray canister both because of the protection provided before bursting, When the propellent charge pressure is too high, and because it acts as a bedding to achieve a satisfactory firing; also as it provides camouflage thus enhancing the surprise efiect.

Because it is made of sheet steel the spraying canister container has sufiicient strength and stability on firing that there is no danger of the container exploding prematurely.

The disadvantage of such a sheet steel canister is that it splinters when exploded, which means that the spraying canisters can only be used on practice training grounds. However, from a military point of view these spraying canisters should be capable of discharge in all types of 3,399,468 Patented Sept. 3, 1968 terrain, in order to accustom troops with the means of producing poison gases to a greater extent than-has previously been possible.

Another disadvantage of these known spraying canisters is that in the firing position there is an annular gap between the canister and the discharging cup which allows dirt and moisture to infiltrate. The result is that water and dirt can collect at the bottom of the discharging cup round the casing of the spraying canister propellent charge, so that in bad cases the propellent charge is so impaired that it misfires.

The object of the invention is to reduce or eliminate these disadvantages and drawbacks, and this is achieved by making the spraying canister container of a synthetic material which disintegrates into small parts which are not dangerous, the required stability of the canister during firing being provided by ribs thereon.

It has been found that a low-pressure polyethylene sold under the name of Hostalen GF 5740, is particularly suitable for the spraying container material. Despite the large capacity of the container of 10 litres of fluid, with this material it is possible to use a relatively small wall thickness which not only gives the container excellent stability on firing, but also means that there is no danger when it disintegrates. The container disintegrates into small particles, which can no longer be called splinters, so that this novel spraying canister can be used during manouvres in any type of training ground and countryside.

Other advantages and details of the invention will be explained in greater detail with reference to the accompanying drawing, which shows a spraying canister inserted into a discharging cup ready for firing.

As in previous constructions, the discharging cup 1 is of a simple, cylindrical sheet steel holder, which is preferably, as shown, buried up to the upper rim in the earth. The spraying canister complete with all detonating, propellent and explosive components is inserted into this holder. The spraying canister essentially consists of a thinwalled container 2 having a one-piece, cylindrical shell 2a with a cap 2b fitted to it, and an insertable bottom 3, all made of a synthetic material capable, on explosion of the canister, of disintegration into small, harmless parts. In the upper and lower regions of the shell 2a there are circumferential, riged reinforcing ribs 4 projecting radially outwards which not only increase the stability of the container, whilst keeping the same wall thickness, but also above all act as guide devices in the discharging cup and provide a seal between the container 2 and discharging cup 1. The cap 2b formed integrally with the shell 2a, has a diameter which is sufficiently larger than the reinforcing ribs 4 of the shell 2a, for the shoulder 5 connecting the cap 2b to the shell 2a to act as support resting with its lower edge on the rim of the discharging cup 1. This shoulder 5 of the cap engaging over the rim of the discharging cup 1 has the particular advantage over the previous design thatso long as the spraying canister is held in the discharging cup-neither dirt nor rain can penetrate into the discharging cup 1. In addition, the dimensions of the container from the shoulder 5 to the bottom edge of the base 3 can be so chosen in relation to the height of the discharging cup that the base of the container does not extend to the bottom of the discharging cup, so that the spraying canister 2 is suspended in the discharging cup 1 from its shoulder 5. The base 3 is arranged to project a substantial amount inside of the container 2. Thin, but deep, radial ribs 3a give the base exceptional stability. The base 3 has a doubled-back rim formed by edges 6 and 7 which fit tightly round the lower end of the shell 2a, the outer edge 7 having an inwardly directed hook 8 engaging in a recess 9 in the outer surface of the shell 2a. When the base 3 is inserted, the hooked edge expands slightly and snaps into the recess 9. This quick and eflicient fixing of the base 3 can be improved still further if both edges 6 and 7 are fixed to the shell 2a by a suitable adhesive. The outer edge 7 corresponds in diameter to the reinforcing ribs 4 and therefore has the important function of being the guide and seal element closest to the propellent charge located in the base 3.

The base 3 is fitted with various attachments, e.g. with an attachment 10 for holding a propellent charge 10a, an attachment 11 for connecting to a detonator and delay tube 11a containing the detonating and delay system 11b and an attachment 12 for holding a capsule 12a containing an explosive charge 12b. The detonating and delay system tube 11a projects upwards beyond the cap 2b and is fixed by a nut 13 which in turn mounts a detonator, e.g. a friction igniter 14 operated by a pull wire 14a. The cap 2b also has a filling connection 15 closed by a cap 16.

To close the attachment 10 containing the propellent charge 10a there is a lid 10b which is about level with the lower edge of the container.

Between the attachments 10 and 12 is a threaded plug 17 having a central bore 17b which contains a delay mechanism 17a.

The mode of operation of this spraying canister is as follows.

As already mentioned, the spraying canister 2 as shown in the drawing is inserted into the discharging cup 1 ready for firing. When the friction wire 14a is pulled, the ignition system of the friction igniter 14 reacts and transmits an ignition spark to the time fuse 11b. The time of combustion of this fuse is such that troops can leave the zone of activity of the spraying canister without hurrying. When the time fuse 11b has burnt down to the base 3, it ignites the propellent charge 10a so that a high gas pressure builds up beneath the base 3 which projects and accelerates the spraying canister to a height of about 30 metres, depending on the position of the buried discharging cup.

Meanwhile, the propellent charge 10a has also ignited the time fuse 17a in the central bore 17b. The combustion time for the fuse 17a corresponds approximately to the flight duration of the spraying canister so that at the moment at which the canister reaches its maximum height, the fuse 17a detonates the explosive charge 12b which in turn bursts the container 2 and sprays its fluid contents over a wide area.

Since primarily the purpose of the spraying canister is to simulate the liberation of poisonous gases, to be used in action, the opposing troops must not be hurt either by the disintegrated container or by its contents. The container disintegrates into small parts which are not dangerous because of their small weight. The gaseous contents consist of a neutral fluid with the special property that its presence can be detected in the countryside by colouring produced by a dispersed powder.

The flight duration, height of trajectory, time of explosion and scattering area diameter can be changed by altering the characteristics of the ignition time fuses 11b and 17a and the propellent and explosive charges 10a and 12b.

I claim:

1. A spraying canister comprising a container for holding a mock poison gas, the container being made of a synthetic material capable of disintegration into small pieces which are not dangerous, the said container having a lid mounting an ignition and fuse system, a propellent charge for firing the spraying canister from a discharge receptacle, an explosive charge for bursting the said container and scattering the said contents thereof, the said container having ribs on a surface thereof for providing stability to the said container during the said firing of the spraying canister, a cylindrical shell, a gap formed as a one-piece construction with said shell, and a base insertable into the end of said shell opposite said cap, said ribs being disposed in respectively upper and lower regions of said shell, said ribs being outwardly projecting circumferentially extending reinforcing ribs adapted to act as guide and sealing rings during firing of said canister from said receptacle, the said container cap being circular and has a diameter greater than that of said reinforcing ribs and defines a shoulder extending from said shell, and said shoulder adapted to rest on an edge of said discharge receptacle and thereby to act as a support for said canister.

2. A spraying canister as claimed in claim 1, wherein said base has inner and outer edge walls together defining a double-edged rim for said base, said outer edge having a hooked portion, and in which said shell has at the end opposite said cap a recess in the outer surface thereof, said double-edged rim fitting over said end of the shell with said hooked portion engaging in said recess.

3. A s raying canister as claimed in claim 1, wherein the said base is dished inwardly of the container, and wherein said propellent charge attachment is a capsule extending from said base approximately to the end of said shell remote from said cap, a cover closing the said capsule on the underside thereof, and two independent attachments projecting into the interior of said container from the end of said capsule adjacent the said base.

4. A spraying canister as claimed in claim 1, in which an attachment is provided for holding said explosive charge is closed in the region of said base by a threaded plug having a central bore, and a time fuse housed in said central bore.

5. A spraying canister adapted to be fired from a hollow receptacle comprising a container for holding a mock poison gas, the said container having a lid mounting an ignition and time fuse system, means adapted to house a propellent charge for firing the said spraying canister from said receptacle, means adapted to house an explosive charge for bursting said container and scattering the said contents thereof, said container being made of a low-pressure plastics material capable on said bursting of the container of disintegration into small harmless pieces, said container further having a cylindrical shell portion formed with integral, outwardly projecting circumferential ribs adapted to engage in sealing relation with said receptacle, and to impart mechanical stability to said container during said firing thereof, said shell having an open end closed by an insertable base member adapted to engage with the wall of said shell at the said open end thereof and to project outwardly of said wall to an extent corresponding to the projection of said ribs, and said base being dished towards the interior of said container and has stilfening ribs extending radially of said shell.

6. A spraying canister adapted to be fired from a hollow receptacle comprising a container for holding a mock poison gas, the said container having a lid mounting an ignition and time fuse system, means adapted to house a propellent charge for firing the said spraying canister from said receptacle, means adapted to house an explosive charge for bursting said container and scattering the said contents thereof, said container being made of a low-pressure plastics material capable on said bursting of the container of disintegration into small harmless pieces, said container further having a cylindrical shell portion formed with integral, outwardly projecting circumferential ribs adapted to engage in sealing relation with said receptacle, and to impart mechanical stability to said container during said firing thereof, said shell having an open end closed by an insertable base member 5 6 adapted to engage with the wall of said shell at the said References Cited open end thereof and to project outwardly of said wall UNITED STATES PATENTS to an extent cor-responding to the proyectron of said ribs, and said base being dished towards the interior of said 8111048 1/1906 Fnedel 1088 X container, and means mounting said lpropellent charge 5 2,340,047 1/1944 Dunn 89 1-3 housing means centrally on said base on the outer side 3,102,477 9/1963 Stefan thereof, and wherein said outwardly projecting portion 3,344,742 10/1967 Schnelder 1028 X of said base when engaged with said receptacle wall functions as a primary seal to prevent leakage of propellent EUGENE CAPOZIO P'lmary Exammer' charge gases during said firing of said canister. 10 P. WILLIAMS, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US811048 *Nov 8, 1904Jan 30, 1906Albert Hugo FriedelShell.
US2340047 *Aug 20, 1941Jan 25, 1944Dunn Andrew CFlare gun
US3102477 *Nov 21, 1961Sep 3, 1963Stefan Russell ORocket signal device
US3344742 *May 10, 1965Oct 3, 1967Cornell Aeronautical Labor IncExplosive projector
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3780655 *Feb 24, 1969Dec 25, 1973Us Air ForceSignaling device
US3878639 *May 24, 1974Apr 22, 1975Lawrence Peska Ass IncToy hand grenade
US4564363 *Jul 13, 1983Jan 14, 1986Smithkline Beckman CorporationDelayed action assembly
US5018449 *Sep 20, 1988May 28, 1991Eidson Ii Edward WPaint dispersing training grenade
US5303653 *Sep 29, 1986Apr 19, 1994The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyHigh explosive disseminator for a high explosive air bomb
US5425311 *May 12, 1989Jun 20, 1995The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyHybrid warhead
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/11, 102/367
International ClassificationF42C14/00, F42B8/28, F42B23/16, F42B8/00, F42C14/08, F42B23/00, F41H9/00, F41H9/04
Cooperative ClassificationF42B8/28, F41H9/04, F42C14/08, F42B23/16
European ClassificationF42B23/16, F42C14/08, F42B8/28, F41H9/04