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Publication numberUS3399674 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 3, 1968
Filing dateJul 1, 1965
Priority dateJul 1, 1965
Publication numberUS 3399674 A, US 3399674A, US-A-3399674, US3399674 A, US3399674A
InventorsPannier Karl A, Ring Wallace H, Sorenson James L
Original AssigneeVoys Inc Le
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Catheter placement unit
US 3399674 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 3, 1968 K. A. PANNIER ET AL 3,399,674

CATHETER PLACEMENT UNIT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 1, 1965 INVENTORS K424 A a/v/v/ze MzzAaz' 6 /n/c /q/vrs Z. 6%?471/50/1 kw WTTORNEYS Sept. 3, 1968 K. A. PANNIER ET AL 3,399,674

CATHETER PLACEMENT UNIT 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 1, 1965 INVENTORS ATTORNE Y8 3,399,674 CATHETER PLACEMENT UNIT Karl A. Pannier, Wallace H. Ring, and James L. Sorenson,

Salt Lake City, Utah, assignors to Le Voys Inc., a corporation of Utah Filed July 1, 1965, Ser. No. 468,869 6 Claims. (Q1. 128-2144) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLGSURE A catheter placement unit embodying a catheter and needle in coaxial relationship, the needle being entirely removable after the catheter is positioned in a body lumen.

This invention or discovery relates to improvements in a catheter placement unit, and more particularly to a catheter placement unit highly desirable for use with infants and for surface veins of the type appearing on the back of the hand, although the invention will have other uses and purposes as will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

In the past, various types of catheter placement units for positioning small and rather short catheters in surface veins and similar locations have been developed, but have not proven as eflicient as is desired in most cases. In some instances such placement units embodied slotted cannulated needles, and some physicians and surgeons object to slotted needles, preferring a completely round cylindrical needle. However, with a small surface vein unit as heretofore made, there was no way to withdraw a completely cylindrical cannulated needle after the catheter was positioned. Another objection to catheter placement units of this type, as heretofore made, resided in the fact that there was nothing to prevent relative rotation between the cannulated needle and the catheter, particularly during withdrawal of the needle, with the resultant possibility of cutting the catheter, and the danger of a piece of catheter remaining free in the vein of the patient.

With the foregoing in mind, it is an important object of the instant invention to provide a catheter placement unit for use in connection with surface veins and the like which may be constructed either with a slotted cannulated needle or a fully cylindrical cannulated needle, each of which may readily be withdrawn after placement of the catheter.

Another important object of this invention is the provision of a catheter placement unit of the type herein set forth, so constructed that infusion may be started before withdrawal of the cannulated needle used to make the venipuncture and position the catheter.

Also a desideratum of the instant invention is the provision of a catheter placement unit for positioning a catheter in surface veins or for use with infants, the unit being so constructed that relative rotation between the catheter and the cannulated needle associated therewith is prevented during the venipuncture and positioning of the catheter, and withdrawal of the needle thereafter.

It is also a feature of this invention to provide a catheter placement unit for use in connection with surface veins and the like, which unit can readily be made either with a slotted cannulated needle embracing the catheter to be positioned, or with a fully cylindrical cannulated needle extending through the catheter to be positioned, the needle in either form being completely withdrawable after venipuncture and positioning of the catheter, and in both cases infusion may be started prior to withdrawal of the needle.

While some of the more salient features, characteristics atent O 3,39,674 Patented Sept. 3, 1968 and advantages of the instant invention have been above pointed out, others will become apparent from the following disclosures, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of a catheter placement unit embodying principles of the instant invention;

FIGURE 2 is an exploded view of the structure of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a greatly enlarged fragmentary central vertical sectional view through the structure of FIGURE 1, with the catheter shown in elevation;

FIGURE 4 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line IV-IV of FIGURE 3, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated 'by the line VV of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary perspective view of a catheter placement unit of different form, embodying prinriales of the instant invention;

FIGURE 7 is an exploded view of the structure of FIGURE 6;

FIGURE 8 is an enlarged fragmentary central vertical sectional view through the structure of FIGURE 6, showing the cannulated needle in elevation;

FIGURE 9 is an enlarged fragmentary transverse vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line IX-IX of FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 10 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view through a catheter placement unit embodying principles of the instant invention, but showing a different method of interlock to prevent relative rotation between the catheter and cannulated needle;

FIGURE 11 is a vertical sectional view of the structure of FIGURE 10 taken in the same relative location as FIGURE 4; and

FIGURE 12 is a fragmentary transverse vertical sectional view taken substantially as indicated by the line XIIXII of FIGURE 10.

As shown on the drawings:

With references now to FIGURES 1 to 5, inclusive, it will be seen that the first illustrated embodiment of the instant invention embodies a fitting 1 having a main passage 2 therethrough which is preferably straight, but which varies in size as clearly seen in FIGURE 3. The fitting also has a branch passage 3 communicating at an angle with the aforesaid passage 2. The outer end of the passage 3 is enlarged to form a socket for the reception of an end of a flexible tube 4 which is connected to any suitable form of infusion system.

The fitting 1 is preferably of moldable plastic material, such as a synthetic resin plastic, polystyrene, polyethylene, among others, there being many satisfactory materials of that character on the market. The tube 4 is also preferably of plastic material, such having proven highly satisfactory for use in connection with infusion systems.

A catheter 5 projects through a nose 6 on the fitting 1, as seen best in FIGURE 2, and extends through the passage 2 in the fitting to the point of junction between the passages 2 and 3 and then extends upwardly into the passage 3 and into the tube 4 which connects with the infusion system. The catheter is preferably also made of plastic material, and is fused to the tube 4 which in turn is fused to the fitting 1. The catheter is thereby firmly held in position.

A cannulated needle 7 having a slot 8 along its upper side is disposed in the passage 2 of the fitting 1 in telescopic association with the catheter, the needle projecting farther out of the fitting 1 than does the catheter 5, as clearly seen in FIGURE 1, to facilitate venipuncture. The

outer end of the needle is provided with a hub 9 having a projecting portion 10 thereon which seats within the passage 2 in the fitting 1.

From the showings in FIGURES 4 and 5, it will be especially noted that the passage 2 through the fitting is not completely circular. In the nose portion 6 of the fitting, the passage is provided with a fiat top 11, FIG- URE 4, over the slot 8 in the cannulated needle. In the outer portion of the fitting both the top of the passage 2 and the top portion of the extension 10 on the needle hub are flattened as indicated at 12 in FIGURE 5. Thus, an interlocking engagement between the fitting and the needle, and between the fitting and the needle hub, is provided so that it is impossible for the needle to rotate relatively to the catheter during withdrawal. Therefore, there is no chance of the needle severing the catheter during manipulation of the placement unit.

Of course, the needle 7 may be initially covered by a removable needle protector of any suitable type, and the entire placement unit packaged in a sterile closure, if so desired.

In use, the placement of the catheter in a :body vein is extremely simple and rapid with the instant invention. Connection of the tube 4 to an infusion system may be made prior to venipuncture. The attending doctor or nurse then grasps the fitting 1 and needle hub 9 which conjointly function as a handle, makes the venipuncture, and infusion can be immediately started. Then, the fitting 1 may be held between the thumb and forefinger of one hand while the needle hub 9 is grasped in the other hand and the needle completely withdrawn leaving the catheter properly positioned in the vein. The fitting 1 may then be taped to the hand or arm of the patient. The needle is discarded, and ultimately the fitting and catheter may be discarded, since the entire placement unit is sufficiently economical for a single usage. It is possible, however, to sterilize the device, reassemble and reuse it for another patient, should circumstances be such as to warrant that procedure.

It will be noted that during manipulation of the placement unit, the needle cannot turn or rotate relatively to the catheter by virtue of the interlocking engagement with the fitting 1. Also, the angular disposition of the tube 4, away from the needle point, facilitates initial connection with the infusion system, and leaves the operating field unimpeded and completely visible during venipuncture. While the angle between the passages 2 and 3 is not critical, 45 as illustrated has been found highly satisfactory.

In the form of the invention seen in FIGURES 6 to 9, inclusive, the same fitting 1 having the angularly arranged passages 2 and 3 therein, and the same tube 4 for connection to the infusion system, as above described have been utilized.

In this instance, however, -a catheter 13-, which may be identical to the previously described catheter except for positioning, is fused in the nose portion 6 of the fitting 1 and does not extend upwardly into the angular passage 3. The catheter projects out of the fitting 1 to a desired extent for placement in a small vein, as clearly seen in FIGURES 6 and 7. Within the fitting the catheter terminates on one side of the junction 14 between the passages 2 and 3. On the other side of that junction, FIG- URE 8, is a plug 15 of self-sealing material compressed and secured within the passage 2. This plug may satisfactorily be of soft rubber.

A cannulated needle 16, securely affixed at its outer end in a hub 17 in the same manner as the above described needle 8 is afiixed to the hub 9 and the hub being provided with an extension 18 to seat inside the passage 2 of the fitting 1, is disposed in the passage 2 as best seen in FIGURE 8. The needle extends through the aforesaid self-sealing block 15 and is telescopically associated with the catheter 13 by extending through the catheter and beyond the end of the catheter as seen clearly in FIG- URE 6. In this instance, the needle is substantially a complete cylinder, with the exception of a single opening 19 in the upper side thereof which is located within the catheter when the needle is in the position of FIGURES 6 and 8. The opening 19 is provided so that infusion may be started as soon as venipuncture is made, and prior to withdrawing the needle.

In this instance, the catheter 13 is preferably constructed to tightly fit around the needle as at 13a at the inner end of the catheter, but outwardly thereof the catheter is sized to provide a space 13b between itself and the needle. This arrangement minimizes leakage of blood and infusion fluid since there is free communication be tween the infusion system and the catheter while the needle is withdrawn through the plug 15.

The hub extension 18 is preferably provided with a flattened top, and the passage is also complementally fiattened at the top, as indicated at 20 in FIGURE 9. Rotatation of the needle relatively to the catheter is more likely at the start of the withdrawal operation, so the complementally flattened portions between the fitting and hub extension eliminate the possibility of such rotation at the start of the withdrawal. The needle passing outwardly through the catheter is not thereafter likely to injure the catheter, since the self-sealing plug 15 will restrain possible rotation of the needle to a suflicient extent.

This form of the invention is utilized in substantially the same manner as the previously described form. Venipuncture is made and the catheter inserted along with the needle. Then, infusion may be at once commenced by virtue of the aperture 19 in the needle. Thereafter, the fitting 1 may be held with one hand, and the needle withdrawn, the plug 15 effectively sealing itself after removal of the needle so as to insure closure of the passage 2 outside the communication between the passages 2 and 3, effectively preventing leakage of infusion fluid and entry of contaminants into the fitting.

In FIGURES 10, 11 and 12 we have illustrated a different form of interlocking engagement to prevent relative rotation of the needle with respect to the catheter. This interlocking arrangement may be utilized with the place ment unit of FIGURES l to 5- inclusive, and also between the needle hub extension 18 and the fitting 1, in the case of the structure of FIGURES 6 to 9 inclusive.

In this arrangement, the nose 6 of the fitting 1 is provided with a depending tongue 21, FIGURE 11, which extends into the slot 8 of the needle 7, thus preventing rotation of the needle relatively to the catheter therein. The needle hub extension 10, FIGURE 12, is provided with a slot 22 in the upper portion thereof into which a depending tongue 23 on the fitting 1 extends so as to interlock the needle hub and prevent rotation of the needle relatively to the catheter. The interlocking arrangement of FIGURES 10, 11 and 12 does not interfere with or change the manipulation of the placement unit in any manner.

From the foregoing, it is apparent that we have provided a novel and efficient catheter placement unit for use in connection with surface veins, or with infants, the unit in either of its forms permitting infusion to start prior to withdrawal of the cannulated needle, and rotation of the needle relatively to the catheter is effectively prevented. The unit is easy and simple to manipulate and a catheter may be accurately and very rapidly placed in position. The structure is also sufficiently economical to warrant discarding after a single usage, if desired.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

We claim as our invention:

1. In a catheter placement unit,

a passaged fitting which functions as a handle,

a catheter projecting from said fitting,

a cannulated needle also projecting from said fitting in telesscopic relationship with said catheter,

a hub fixed on said needle engageable with said fitting,

complemental formations on said needle, and said fitting to prevent relative rotation therebetween, and means to connect said catheter with an infusion system.

2. In a catheter placement unit,

a fitting to function as a handle to perform venipuncture and place a catheter,

said fitting having a main passage therethrough and a branch passage communicating with said main passage,

a catheter secured in position in said branch passage and extending therefrom through a part of said main passage and projecting from one end of said fitting,

a cannulated needle telescopically associated around said catheter,

said needle having a slot therein out of which the catheter extends into said branch passage, and

a hub on said needle seated in said main passage at the other end of said fitting.

3. In a catheter placement unit,

a fitting to function as a handle to perform venipuncture and place a catheter,

said fitting having a main passage therein and a branch passage communicating with the main passage,

a catheter extending from said main passage through one end of said fitting and being secured within said branch passage,

a slotted cannulated needle telescopically associated around said catheter which extends out through the needle slot into said branch passage,

a hub on said needle seated in said main passage at the other end of said fitting, and

an interlocking association between said noodle and said fitting to prevent rotation of said needle relatively to said catheter when said needle is being withdrawn after placement of the catheter.

4. In a catheter placement unit,

a fitting to function as a handle to perform venipuncture and place a catheter,

said fitting having a main passage therein and a branch passage communicating with the main passage,

a catheter extending from said main passage through one end of said fitting and being secured within said branch passage,

a slotted cannulated needle telescopically associated around said catheter which extends out through the needle slot into said branch passage,

a hub on said needle seated in said main passage at the other end of said fitting,

said fitting having a flattened face overlying the slot in said needle, and

said fitting and said hub having confronting flattened faces,

5 placement of the catheter.

5. In a catheter placement unit,

a fitting to function as a handle to perform venipuncture and place a catheter,

said fitting having a main passage therein and a branch passage communicating with the main passage,

a catheter extending from said main passage through one end of said fitting and being secured within said branch passage,

a slotted cannulated needle telescopically associated around said catheter which extends out through the slot into said branch passage,

a hub on said needle seated in said main passage at the other end of said fitting, and

a tongue on said fitting extending into the slot of said needle to prevent relative rotation between the needle and catheter when the needle is withdrawn after placement of the catheter.

6. In a catheter placement unit,

a fitting having a passage therethrough connectable to an infusion system,

a catheter projecting from the passage in said fitting by which said catheter is connected to the infusion system,

a needle also projecting from said fitting in telescopic relation with said catheter and removable entirely from association with the catheter, and

interlocking means between said fitting and said needle preventing relative rotation between said needle and said catheter until the needle is separated from the catheter.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,185,152 5/1965 Ring 128-2l4.4 3,215,141 11/1965 Podhora 128-214.4 3,297,030 1/1967 Czorny et a1. 128-2144 3,313,299 4/1967 Spademan 128-214.4

FOREIGN PATENTS 605,067 2/1926 France. 1,092,011 11/ 1954 France.

265,972 10/ 1913 Germany.

DALTON L. TRULUCK, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3185152 *Jun 19, 1962May 25, 1965Sorenson Res CorpIntravenous catheter placement unit and method of use
US3215141 *Feb 4, 1963Nov 2, 1965Podhora Fred WIntravenous catheter apparatus
US3297030 *Mar 13, 1964Jan 10, 1967Sorenson Res CorpCatheter placement unit with removable cannulated needle
US3313299 *Feb 5, 1964Apr 11, 1967Spademan Richard GIntravascular catheter with coaxial puncturing means
*DE265972C Title not available
FR605067A * Title not available
FR1092011A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3500828 *Aug 31, 1966Mar 17, 1970Fred W PodhoraIntravenous catheter apparatus
US3508545 *Nov 16, 1967Apr 28, 1970Dow CorningCatheter placement unit for paracervical anesthesia
US3610226 *Feb 27, 1968Oct 5, 1971Albisser Anthony MA double lumen cannula for blood sampling
US3670729 *Sep 17, 1969Jun 20, 1972Alan E C BennettTransfusion needles
US3739778 *Aug 12, 1971Jun 19, 1973Bard Inc C RCatheter introduction system
US3766916 *Jul 7, 1972Oct 23, 1973Deseret PharmaY stylet catheter placement assembly
US4016879 *Apr 7, 1975Apr 12, 1977Dynasciences CorporationMulti-mode cannulating apparatus
US4020835 *Feb 11, 1976May 3, 1977Boehringer Ingelheim GmbhCatheter placement assembly
US4037600 *Jul 11, 1975Jul 26, 1977Poncy Mark PCatheter placement system
US4177809 *Sep 15, 1977Dec 11, 1979Warner-Lambert CompanyIntravenous catheter apparatus and method
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US4682981 *Aug 5, 1985Jul 28, 1987Terumo Kabushiki KaishaMedical device
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US5403296 *Dec 13, 1993Apr 4, 1995Mohring; KlausPuncturing instrument
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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/165.4, D24/112
International ClassificationA61M25/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/065
European ClassificationA61M25/06E