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Publication numberUS3399897 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 3, 1968
Filing dateSep 8, 1965
Priority dateSep 8, 1965
Publication numberUS 3399897 A, US 3399897A, US-A-3399897, US3399897 A, US3399897A
InventorsMitchell William N
Original AssigneeWilliam N. Mitchell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Numerically and physically balanced game playing die
US 3399897 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 3, 1968 w. N. MITCHELL NUMERICALLY AND PHYSICALLY BALANCED GAME PLAYING DIE Filed sept. a, 1965 mm wm um mm m N m QM E H o G 1Q M NT OO c o o It H NT O O Nw @o QT@ o S o N l l-\| QM, 4 x @NNN x vw .m ww mv 9v w. mw Q M. .um N .MQ "EB SQ m Q QEEQSSQ WQ mmv@ 2 n 4 Q @my WQQ S ,Sm .Sm M Q `WM .SS Q vx mmol mmol d i@ Q Qm tsm web@ m "SQ 4 1 m ,mv Q .N @MVQ Q v m m .N W nv\o .me a o \Ma\ .No .o N s Qik *mi iQ@ QQ, ,N QQ kbm A .\Nm\k\\ E ATE@ QQQ 25u ASQ .r M W wen QQ Qm n m .n v QSQSQ m N w n v .sa M

IN VENTOR.

BY xm/MW 19mm United States Patent O 3,399,897 NUMERICALLY AND PHYSICALLY BALANCED GAME PLAYHNG DIE William N. lVIitchell, 2646 Fairway, Visalia, Calif. 93277 Filed Sept. 8, 1965, Ser. No. 485,855 4 Claims. (Cl. 273-146) ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE The concept herein disclosed has to do with an octahedral die which is as nearly perfectly balanced in a numerical and physical sense as is reasonably possible. The totals around all six (6) corners equal 18 and the sides 1 2, 3 4, 5 6 and 7 8 are opposed. When this die is cast from the hand and comes to rest on a flat surface the facet or side facing skyward is opposed to the unreadable downward side. Significantly, the same amount of material is not taken from each Vside but from around a given reference point. This die is unique in that it is eight-sided and has sequentially-oriented dimpled pips which coordinate in totaling 18 around any given corner.

The presentg/ention relates, generally categorized, to games of chance such as are customarily played with the aid of a pair of dice thrown from the participants hand or from a cup, and wherein the winning and losing plays are evaluated on the upfacing total of the spots or pips on the dice and has to do, more particularly, with a structurally and functionally unique die.

More particularly, the herein disclosed concept pertains to a die (one of a pair of dice) which is structurally distinct and different from prior art dice-like playing pieces in that instead of being cubicle or some other geometrical shape, it has eight faces or facets and is otherwise made, geometrically interpreted, to represent an octahedron body. Although the dimpled spots or pips which are displayed on the plane faces are not in and of themselves unusual, thej,l are, however, unique in that they are herein oriented and coordinated with each other in an unusual sequential manner and when taken in conjunction with the inherent structural features give rise to and achieve significantly new and improved results.

Several species or embodiments of the generic concept are herein revealed and will be hereinafter set forth with particularity. Each die, generically construed, comprises a roliable octahedron-shaped body provided with eight distributively arranged planar or plane faces and six like or corresponding corners and wherein each face has at least one dimple providing a pip or spot, the latter being of a given shape and size, being arranged numerically from 1 to 8 and each face being balanced in a physical sense and distinguishable, taking into account the number of pips or spots thereon, from every other face.

In carrying out the principles of the present invention each face or facet is not only planar, it is triangular in outiine or plan and of an area to support and sustain the die in a self-standing position when it cornes to rest atop a support surface subsequent to a throw or cast by the player. One such face has a single pip or spot which is identified as 1, another one of the faces has a group of 8 pips and is identified as at 8, while the ones therebetween are marked and numbered from 2 to 7 consecutively to the end when oriented and grouped in keeping with the concept they are readable clockwise (starting from the corner) 1 4-5-8- and, starting from an opposite corner are readable eounterclockwise as 2 3-6-7.

It can be further mentioned by way of introduction that the three forms herein depicted as FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 are characterized as (1) a regular octahedron with lsharp ice edges and sharp corners (2) a regular octahedron with rounded corners and sharp edges (3) a regular octahedron with round-ed corners or beveled edges.

An objective of the instant concept is to develop a die which is precision-balanced in a physical sense, that is, a die that is as nearly perfectly designed and uniformly balanced as is possible. This achievement invokes the relative arrangement of pips and the triangular sides or facets as hereinafter set forth in detail. With such capability the net result of the unique arrangement is that there is a total of 18 pips oriented with each other and around every corner thus achieving requisite balance. As a matter of fact, the improved die totals around all six (6) corners equal 18 and the sides 1 2, 3 4, 5 6, and 7 8 are opposed. Accordingly, when the die is cast or rolled from ones hand and comes to rest on a flat playing surface the side facing skyward is opposed to the unreadable downward side.

As will be hereinafter more fully appreciated the irnproved dice can be aptly used not only in association with the diagrammatically illustrated dealers layout chart herein disclosed but cup dice games for example stop dice, boss dice and many other similar games; can be used in popular games for children and adults such as Monopoly, Careers and the like, as well as a game currently known as Chuck-A-Luck, simply by revising the odds to conform with the herein disclosed type of S-Sided gaming device.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numetals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIGURE l is a plan view of the diagrammatic chart sometimes referred to as a dealers layout and which is herein disclosed to facilitate understanding approximately how in at least one gam-e it is involved in the use of the novel dice herein disclosed and described.

FIGURE 2 is a top plan view, that is a view showing the upper four triangulate sides of a regular octahedron characterized by sharp edges and sharp corners.

FIGURE 3 is a bottom plan view corresponding to FIGURE 2 of a regular octahedron with rounded corners and sharp radial edges.

FIGURE 4 is a similar plan view showing a correspending regular octahedron with rounded corners and convexly rounded radial sloping edges.

By way of introduction to the description of the details it is to be mentioned that three modifications have been shown and may be regarded as either a top plan or bottom plan, it being understood that a regular octahedron or correspondingly geometric type of body has eight sides and six corners and that the upper half is exactly the same as the lower half except for the spots or pips. The improved die shown in FIGURE 2 is denoted as an entity by the numeral 6 and is characterized by four sharp pointed corners 7, 8, 9, and 10 having converging radial straight edges or lines 11, 12, 13 and 14- cooperable therewith and merging into the pinnacle point 16.

The marginal or bordering lines forming the base of each triangle are straight and denoted in each instance by the numeral 17 whereby to thus define four of the eight triangular facets or faces denoted at 18, 20, 22 and 24 respectively. The triangulate face 18 is provided centrally with a single dimple-type spot or pip 26. In the area or facet 20 there are four pips 28, five pips 30 in the sector or area 22 and eight pips 32 in a nal sector or facet 24. It follows that the spots or pips represent the desired numbers 1 8 inclusive. They are arranged in such a manner that looking from one corner they read clockwise 1 4 5-8.

With reference now to the modication showing the 3 bottom four sided half of the octahedron die 6A in FIG- URE 3, the corner portions instead of being sharp as in FIGURE 2, are rounded or convex and are conveniently designated at 34, 36, 38 and 40 respectively which in conjunction with the four straight marginal edges 42 and the upwardly inwardly converging straight sharp edges 44, merging into the convex point 46 define the forward distinguishable triangular facets (faces or sectors) conveniently denoted at 48, 50, S2 and 54 respectively. In this arrangement there are two pips 56 within the marginal limits of the facet 48 and (going counterelockwise) three pips 58 in the area or facet 54, six denoted at 56 in the sector 52 and seven denoted at 58 in the sector 50. When this manne-r of predetermining and locating the spots is followed in the two forms shown in FIGURES 2 and 3 it will be evident that the four sides or faces adjacent any corner of the die, when added together will total 18. The same result will be obtained if the same numbers or spots (FIGURE 2) are run eounterclockwise and the spots or numbers in FIGURE 3 are run clockwise. Both types of playing pieces 6 and 6A are designed to be cast from the hand, rolled from the cup, used in many ways the dice are used. They can be made in various sizes, colors and of various materials that dice are made of. They can be used alone or in groups of two or more.

The same principle is carried out in the embodiment showing the bottom four sided half of the die 6B in FIGURE 4. Here the rounded convex corners are denoted at 58, 60, 62 and 64, the marginal outer perimeter edges at 65 all the way around, and the convex suitably blunted pinnacle, denoted at 69 is provided with outwardly and downwardly diverging straight but convexly chamfered edges which are conveniently referred to here each by the numeral 65. The four triangular faces are denoted at 70, 71, 72 and 74. The spots or pips are arranged in this form of the invention exactly as in the showing in FIG. 2 and conveniently referred to merely by the numeral 76 to avoid repetition and they are in the same order shown in FIG. 3 and already described.

This game is generally similar to a house or bank crap game. It is designed to be used only where gambling is legal. This game is new and varies from a regular house crap game in the following ways:

(l.) This game uses 8 sided dice instead of 6 sided dice.

(2) The numbers 13, 14, 15 and 16 do not appear anywhere on a crap table and cannot be thrown with a pair of dice.

(3) The number 9 in this game is a natural instead of the number 7, which is a natural in a crap game.

(4) The number 16 in this game is a missout instead of the number 12, which is a missout in a crap game.

The layout FIGURE 1 shows a double side dealer layout. This layout can also be made into a single dealer, double dealer, or double end dealer layout merely by changing the positions of the various places for betting. The play and the game remains the same.

The odds sho-wn on this layout can be varied on another layout to give the house a higher or lower percentage as desired. The numbers in the field may be changed to give the house a higher or lower percentage. Additional betting places may be added to the table for additional one-roll bets, or two and three-roll bets.

The odds on all bets are in favor of the house. The percentage in favor of the house on this layout runs from 1.0814% to 15.625%, `depending on where the -bet is placed. On this or any other layout the favorable percentage, on any and all bets, should remain with the house.

Briefly, it is to be explained that any number of persons can play when using the game pieces herein shown and described. The player throwing the dice is the shooter and the dice pass around in a circular path to the left, that is in the usual clockwise manner. The dice are cast from the hand and the two numbers that face skyward when the dice come to rest, added together, are the deciding number.

In general, this game is played like a regular house or bank crap game with the number 9 taking the place of number 7 and the number 16 taking the place of number 12. Standard house rules would apply on all phases of the game not covered herein. It is believed that it is unnecessary to go into considerable detail in respect to each of the Zoned areas of the diagram illustrated in FIGURE 1 inasmuch as the legends are thought to be self-explanatory and since the game is played more or ess along generally well directed lines it has been decided to omit the step-by-step play. For example, without going into detail it will be clear that the shooters iirst roll, and each roll after a decision has been effected, is a comeout. When the shooter misses on the point, the dice pass to the next player on his left and it becomes his turn to shoot. The shooter may pass to the next player on completion of any decision without waiting to missout on the point if he wishes. Any player may, if he likes, refuses to shoot in his turn and pass the dice to the next player, and so on.

It will bc further clear that the sharp edged, sharp cornered and pointed die 6 in FIGURE 2 is primarily designed for use in conjunction with the diagram shown in FIGURE 1 wherein the same is displayed on a felt covered `and suitably padded table. This construction or form will roll satisfactorily on such a soft surface. Having sharp edges and corners, it will be hard to make the dice crooked. This is to say, any alteration of this particular style or form of die would be fairly easy to detect. For this reason it is regarded as a significant contribution to the art of dice.

Except for the rounded corners 34-40 in the embodiment of the die in FIGURE 3 it is much the same as the die 6 of FIGURE 2 and it is a compromise in construction between the type shown in FIGURE 2 and the type shown in FIGURE 4 in that it will roll satisfactorily and acceptably in a fairly hard surface because of the rounded or convex corners 34-40. The type or form shown in FIGURE 4 is designed for use on hard surfaces such as the table or bar top. It will roll well cast by hand -or out of a cup onto a hard surface.

It is reiterated that inasmuch as the novelty is herein under advisement to reside in a single improved die or a pair of dice wherein each die Iis basically the same in construction it is not deemed either necessary or advisable to fully develop the aspect of the disclosure hav ing to do with FIGURE 1 and involving the betting, that is, place bets and the art other than already briey touched upon. It is submitted that a careful consideration of the invention claimed and as covered specifically relative to FIGURES 2 to 4 inclusive, will clarify the nature of the subject matter and character of the advance in the art set forth. Therefore, a more extended description of the details is deemed to be unnecessary.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles ofthe invention. Further, since numerous modications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. For use in playing a game of chance: an improved die constituting one of a pair of dice and comprising, a rollable octahedron-shaped body provided with eight distributively arranged planar faces and six like corners, each face having at least one dimpled pip of a given shape and size, all of said pips being alike and ranging numerically from one pipe to eight pips and each face being distinguishable, by the number of balanced pips thereon, from every other face, each face being triangular and of the same triangulate dimension in plane, one face having a single dimpled pip, another one of said faces having eight dimpled pips, and the other complemental faces interposed therebetween being likewise equipped with corresponding dimpled pips ranging from two pips to seven pips consecutively, the orientation of the coordinating pips being such that they are arranged and are readable clockwise, starting from one corner, 1-4-5-8 and, starting from :an opposite corner, they are readable counterclockwise 2-3-6-7, wherein the first-named sequence 1-4-5-8 is oriented and coordinated with the second-named sequence 2-3-6-7 in such a manner that faces identifiable as 1 and 2 are opposed; faces 3 and 4 are opposed; faces 5 and 6 are opposed; and faces 7 and 8 are opposed, whereby with the over-all complemental lfaces so constructed, the pips on any four triangular faces adjacent to any given corner, when added together, will total 18.

2. As a new article of manufacture, an improved rollable die constituting one of the usually used pa-ir of dice, said die comprising a uniformly balanced block-like body octahedron in shape, provided with eight planar side faces, each face being triangular and distinguishable from all others by a single dimpled pip, or plurality of dimpled pips, all of the six corners of said die being sharppointed and all of the three marginal edges of each triangular side face being straight and sharp-edged from end to end, all of said faces being of the saine triangulate dimension in plan, one triangular face having a single pip denoted l1, the next adjacent face, reading clockwise having four pips denoted 4, the next adjacent face having five pips and being denoted S, and the next and final face in the sequence having eight pips and being denoted 8, 'whereby the thus prescribed totals around all six corners equal 18 and the sides 1-2, 3-4, 5-6 and 7-3 are diametrically opposed.

3l. As a new article of manufacture, an improved rollable die constituting one of the usually used pair of dice, said die comprising a uniformly balanced blocklike body octahedron in shape, provided with eight planar side faces, each face being triangular and distinguishable from all -others by a single dimpled pip or a plurality of dimpled pips as the case may be, all of the six corners of said die being convexly rounded and blunt and all of the three marginal edges of each side face being straight and sharpedged, all of said faces being of the same triangulate dimension in plan, one triangular face having a single pip denoted 1, the next adjacent face, reading clockwise having four pips denoted 4, the next adjacent face having ve pips `and being denoted 5, and the next and final face in the sequence having eight pips and being denoted 8, whereby the thus prescribed totals around all six corners equal 18 and the sides 1-2, 3-4, 5-6 and 7-8 are diametrically opposed.

4. As -a new article of manufacture, an improved rollable die constituting one of the usually used pair of dice comprising a block-like uniformly balanced octahedron body said body having eight planar sides each side triangular and distinguishable from -all other sides by a single dimpled pip or a plurality of dimpled pips all six corners of said die being convexly rounded and blunt, and all three of the marginal edges bordering each side being straight but cham-fered in a lengthwise direction, smooth-finished and slightly convex from one end to the other end, all of said sides being of the same triangulate dimension in plan, one triangular side having a single pip denoted 1, the next adjacent side when read clockwise having four pips denoted 4, the next adjacent side having five pips and being denoted 5, and the next and nal side in the sequence of sides having eight pips and being denoted S, whereby the thus prescribed totals around all six corners equal 18 and the sides 1-2, 3 4, 5-6 and 7-8- are diametrically opposed.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,279,409 9/1918 Murray 273-146 D. 60,575 3/1922 Saart 273-146 1,539,015 5/19'25 Mitchell 273-146 2,922,652 1/1960 Stange 273-146 3,208,754 9/1965 Sieve 273-146 ANTON O. OECHSLE, Primary Examiner,

A. W. KRAMER, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US1279409 *Apr 6, 1918Sep 17, 1918Timothy J MurrayDie.
US1539015 *Sep 10, 1923May 26, 1925Paul MitchellDice
US2922652 *Nov 2, 1953Jan 26, 1960Herman E StangeRacing dice game
US3208754 *Feb 20, 1963Sep 28, 1965Sieve Fredda F SDice game with a tetrahedron die
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US4158921 *Sep 8, 1977Jun 26, 1979Stolpen Beulah HEducational teaching and self-correcting apparatus adaptable to a variety of subject matters
US4239226 *Sep 29, 1978Dec 16, 1980Palmer E FrederickRandom number generator
US4299392 *Aug 4, 1980Nov 10, 1981Tammen Bobby JTop dice roulette game
US4334685 *Nov 20, 1980Jun 15, 1982Anthony RobbinsThree dice wagering game
US4465279 *Jan 28, 1982Aug 14, 1984Larson Roland ERegular dodecahedron die with opposite faces having identical numbers of indicia
US4746126 *Feb 12, 1986May 24, 1988Angileri Benjamin TCombination craps and card game
US4989875 *Jan 26, 1989Feb 5, 1991Gilbert CapyDice having eight faces and process of producing same
US5487547 *Sep 13, 1994Jan 30, 1996Hobert; Marcus V.Craps layout arrangement having jackpot area
US5490670 *Feb 16, 1995Feb 13, 1996Hobert; Marcus V.Craps layout arrangement with jackpot wagering area and randomized jackpot sequences
US5700010 *Jan 6, 1997Dec 23, 1997Mimier; Robert F.Method of playing a dice wagering game
US5728002 *Nov 13, 1995Mar 17, 1998Hobert; Marcus V.Craps game layout with a jackpot wagering area offering multiple wagers
US5785596 *Sep 12, 1995Jul 28, 1998Hobert; Marcus V.Craps layout arrangement with jackpot wagering area and mechanically generated randomized jackpot sequences
US5806847 *Jul 10, 1997Sep 15, 1998White; Roger L.Wagering game employing dice
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US5839960 *Aug 14, 1996Nov 24, 1998Parra; Anthony C.Table for playing a game of chance
US6431546 *Nov 14, 2000Aug 13, 2002Renee M. KellerApparatus and method of playing a casino-type dice game
US6655689Feb 28, 2002Dec 2, 2003Perry B. StasiCraps game improvement
US6896264 *Aug 27, 2003May 24, 2005Jose Cherem HaberMethod of playing a dice wagering game
US6926275Jun 11, 2003Aug 9, 2005Louis J. ZocchiFive sided dice
US7568697 *Jun 20, 2005Aug 4, 2009Applied Gaming Dynamics, LlcEnhanced casino craps game
US7686305Aug 30, 2006Mar 30, 2010Hopbet, Inc.Craps game improvement
US8540246Dec 18, 2012Sep 24, 2013Jeffery S. QualeyBalanced six-sided dice
US8573595Apr 2, 2012Nov 5, 2013Alireza PirouzkhahVariable point generation craps game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/146, 273/274
International ClassificationA63F9/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/0415
European ClassificationA63F9/04D