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Publication numberUS3400628 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 10, 1968
Filing dateMay 18, 1966
Priority dateMay 18, 1966
Publication numberUS 3400628 A, US 3400628A, US-A-3400628, US3400628 A, US3400628A
InventorsLothar J Herzog
Original AssigneeGrace Fibres Canada Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flexible weight line and method of making weight line
US 3400628 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

m- 10, 1968 L. J. HERZOG 3,400,628

FLEXIBLE WEIGHT LINE AND METHOD OF MAKING WEIGHT LINE Filed May 18, 1966 lIIVlHTOR LOTHAR J-HERZOG A7708 N YS United States Patent 3,400,628 FLEXIBLE WEIGHT LINE AND METHOD OF MAKING WEIGHT LINE Lothar J. Herzog, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada,

assignor, by mesne assignments, to Grace Fibres Canada Ltd., Brantford, Ontario, Canada Filed May 18, 1966, Ser. No. 551,135 7 Claims. (Cl. 87-6) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A flexible weighted line comprising a core of short sections of lead, an inner braided jacket holding the lead sections, straight yarns of limited stretchability surrounding the inner braided jacket and an outer braided jacket surrounding the straight yarns.

This invention relates to flexible weight lines and to methods of making these lines.

Some types of fish nets operate in a substantially vertical plane. These nets have floats connected to upper edges thereof and weights attached to the lower edges. Some nets have individual weights connected to their lower edges, while others have lines formed of lead alone or formed with lead cores encased in plastic materials, or braided jackets. The individual weights on nets are troublesome to handle when the nets are drawn in or paid out, and they keep coming off the nets and so are lost. The lead lines whether encased or not are troublesome since they are much too stiff, and are diflicult to handle, to pull over drums or rollers, and it is practically impossible to coil them or wind them on drums.

The present invention overcomes these difficulties by providing a weight line which is extremely flexible and yet has sufficient weight for its purpose. This highly flexible line is so constructed that the stretch thereof is kept at a minimum and, in fact, the stretch can be regulated within reasonable limits to a desired degree.

A flexible weight line according to this invention includes a metal core formed in short sections generally in axial alignment. An inner jacket formed of flexible material, usually a suitable rope-making material, fits around this core and holds said sections in position near each other. A layer of strong straight and flexible strands of a predetermined stretchability and size surrounds the inner jacket and extends axially of the line, said strands being free to move relative to each other. An outer jacket formed of flexible material, usually a suitable rope-making material, fits around the strand layer to hold said layer in position on the inner jacket. The metal core can be made as heavy as desired since the short sections thereof are such that the core does not interfere with the flexibility of the line. The inner jacket holds the metal core sections in their proper positions relative to each other. It is preferable to braid the inner jacket so that it is extremely flexible. The long straight strands are flexible and separated from each other so that relative movement can take place between these strands. As the strands extend axially of the line and are co-axial with the core thereof, they determine the stretchability of the line, this depending.

fish net. These twines are used to attach the net to the lead or weight line. The comparatively soft and uneven outer surface of the braided jacket prevents the twines from slipping longitudinally of the weight line.

Any suitable material may be used in the jackets and the strands. For example, polyamide, polyester, polypropylene, glass fibres and the like are very satisfactory for the jackets. Yarns of these materials are suitable for use as the strands. Polyamide has considerable stretch, while polyester has very little stretch. It is necessary to control the stretchability of the weight line since a line with too much stretch in it would allow the fish net to which it is attached to be distorted, Whereas a line with no stretchability might under some circumstances cause damage to the net.

It is preferable to use lead wire as the metal core since the specific gravity of lead is high, it is easily worked and readily available.

The method according to the present invention comprises partially severing a metal wire core at closely spaced intervals, along the length thereof to form interconnected short sections, and forming an inner jacket of suitable flexible material around said core. The core in its jacket is bent to sever the core sections from each other, said inner jacket being tight enough to maintain the core sections in general axial alignment. A layer of strong straight and flexible strands of a predetermined stretchability and size is formed around the inner jacket and extends axially of the line. These strands are free move relative to each other. An outer jacket of suitable flexible material is formed around the strand layer to hold said layer in position on the inner jacket. The inner and outer jackets are usually formed of a suitable rope-making material, and it is preferable to braid them so that they can be made to hold the core sections and the strands in their proper positions without interfering with the flexibility of the line. As stated above, the jackets can be made of polyamide, polyester, polypropylene, glass fibres and the like, and the filaments can be made of yarns formed of these materials. It is preferable to make the core of lead wire since this can be nipped at closely spaced intervals so that when it is flexed back and forth, the sections break away from each other. This severing of the core sections can be quickly and easily done.

It is preferable to braid the inner jacket around the metal wire core, flex the core and jacket to separate the sections of the core, and then to apply the layer of strands or yarns to the inner jacket as the latter is fed into a braiding machine where the outer jacket is braided around these elements.

An example of a weight line made in accordance with this invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which,

FIGURE 1 illustrates a metal core braided thereon,

FIGURE 2 illustrates a flexible weight line, showing each of the elements forming this line,

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged diagrammatic longitudinal section through a portion of a weight line, and

FIGURE 4 is a diagrammatic illustration of apparatus for bending the metal core to separate the sections thereof.

Referring to the drawings, 10 is a flexible weight line comprising a metal, usually lead, wire core 12 which has been nipped or partially severed at closely space-d intervals 13 forming therebetween short interconnected sections 16. An inner jacket 18, usually braided, is formed around core wire 12. This jacket is usually made fairly tight around the core wire.

The inner jacket and core are flexed back and forth in any suitable manner in order to separate sections 16 from each other. For example, the jacketed core can be wound with an inner jacket 3 back and forth a number of times over a pair of parallel and spaced rotating shafts 21 and 22, see FIGURE 4. This separates the core sections 16 from each other, while jacket 18 holds them generally in axial alignment, as shown in FIGURE 3.

After this operation, a layer of strong straight strands or yarns 25 is applied to the outer surface of inner jacket 18, arranged around said jacket. The strands or yarns preferably completely surround the inner jacket, but they may be spaced apart at intervals therearound. These strands or yarns extend axially of core 12, and the number of these strands or yarns, and the size or denier thereof, depends upon the strength required in the finished weight wire. These strands or yarns mainly carry any tensile load applied to the line. At the same time or immediately after, an outer jacket 28 is formed around the layer of strands 25. This jacket is preferably braided over the strands or yarns.

It will be readily recognized that although the finished weight line 32 of FIGURE 3 has a metal core, usually lead, and is relatively heavy, it is extremely flexible. The core sections 16 are very short as compared to the diameter of the weight line so that the core does not interfere with the flexibility of the line. This line can be held in a hand and shaken back and tforth, and it is as supple as anything can be. Inner jacket 18 and outer jacket 28, being braided, are extensible and very flexible. The strands or yarns 25 extend longitudinally or axially of the weight line, are free to move relative to each other and are quite close to the longitudinal axis of the line so that they do not interfere with the flexibility thereof. These strands or yarns, however, determine the strength and the stretchability of the line. These strands or yarns take substantially the entire tensile load applied to the line since the inner and outer jackets are quite extensible, and the core is in separated sections. The stretchability of the strands or yarns 25 depends upon the material forming them since they are straight and extend axially of the line.

Outer jacket 28, being braided, has a comparatively soft and rough or uneven sunface so that hanging twines tied around the weight line cannot slip longitudinally thereof.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. A highly flexible Weight line comprising a metal core formed in short sections generally in axial alignment, an inner jacket formed of rope-making material fitting around said core and holding said sections in position near each other, a layer of strong straight yarns of a predetermined stretchability and size surrounding the inner jacket and extending axially of the line, said yarns being free to move relative to each other, and an outer jacket formed of ropemaking material fitting around the yarn layer to hold said layer in position on the inner jacket.

2. A weight line as claimed in claim 1 in which both the inner jacket and the outer jacket are braided.

3. A weight line as claimed in claim 1 in which said inner jacket holds said core sections in position near each other.

4. A weight line as claimed in claim 1 in which the core is formed of lead.

5. The method of making highly flexible weight lines which comprises partially severing a metal wire core at closely spaced intervals along the length thereof to form interconnected short sections, forming an inner jacket of rope-making material around the wire core, bending the wire core and jacket to sever the core sections from each other, said inner jacket being tight enough to maintain the core sections in general axial alignment, forming a layer of strong straight yarns of a predetermined stretchability and size around the inner jacket and extending axially of the line, said yarns being free to move relative to each other, and forming an outer jacket of rope-making material around the yarn layer to hold said layer in position on the inner jacket.

6. The method of making highly flexible weight lines which comprises partially severing a'metal wire core at closely spaced intervals along the length thereof to form interconnected short sections, braiding an inner jacket of rope-making material around the wire core, bending the wire core and jacket to sever the core sections from each other, said inner jacket being tight enough to maintain the core sections in general axial alignment, forming a layer of strong straight yarns of a predetermined stretchability and size around the inner jacket and extending axially of the line, said yarns being free to move relative to each other, and braiding an outer jacket of rope-making material around the yarn layer to hold said layer in position on the inner jacket.

7. The method of making highly flexible weight lines which comprises partially severing a lead wire core at closely spaced intervals along the length thereof to form interconnected short sections, braiding an inner jacket of flexible material around the wire core, bending the wire core and jacket to sever the core sections from each other, said inner jacket being tight enough to maintain the core sections in general axial alignment forming a layer of strong straight and flexible strands of a predetermined stretchability and size around the inner jacket and extending axially of the line, said yarns being free to move relative to each other, and braiding an outer jacket of flexible material around the strand layer to hold said layer in position on the inner jacket.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,050,748 1/1913 Paulsson 8'7--6 2,048,849 7/1936 Di Lustro et al 87-6 2,291,568 7/1942 Balch 87-6 FOREIGN PATENTS 19,907 1904 Great Britain.

JOHN PETRAKES, Primary Examiner,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1050748 *May 4, 1911Jan 14, 1913Arvid Paulus PaulssonMethod of manufacturing sinking-weights for fishing-tackle.
US2048849 *Sep 6, 1935Jul 28, 1936Anaconda Wire & Cable CoCovered wire and method for producing the same
US2291568 *Oct 29, 1941Jul 28, 1942Union Asbestos & Rubber CoTube covering and method of making
GB190419907A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3564966 *Mar 3, 1969Feb 23, 1971Truman W PowellApparatus for introducing inserts in tubular braided articles
US4057001 *Oct 31, 1969Nov 8, 1977Martin Marietta CorporationEndless carrier sleeve for discrete fragments
US4058049 *Mar 22, 1976Nov 15, 1977Bech Johan HAnchor rope
US4761945 *Oct 3, 1985Aug 9, 1988August Bunger Bob-Textilwerk Kg. Gmbh & Co.Weighting cord for curtains, drapes and the like
US5659994 *Nov 29, 1995Aug 26, 1997Berkley, Inc.Braided flyline
US6574819Jun 22, 2000Jun 10, 2003Robert RatcliffeMethods and devices for removing dew from grass areas such as golf courses
USD695970 *Sep 23, 2011Dec 17, 2013Jennifer BeinkeLeash
Classifications
U.S. Classification87/6, 57/207
International ClassificationA01K77/00, D07B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationD07B2201/1096, D07B1/02, A01K77/00, D07B2201/2064, D07B1/00, D07B2501/2038
European ClassificationA01K77/00, D07B1/00, D07B1/02