Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3401694 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1968
Filing dateDec 4, 1964
Priority dateDec 4, 1964
Publication numberUS 3401694 A, US 3401694A, US-A-3401694, US3401694 A, US3401694A
InventorsTouchberry Alice
Original AssigneeTouchberry Alice
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
System for colonic therapy
US 3401694 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 17, 1968 A. TOUCHBERRY SYSTEM FOR COLONIC THERAPY Filed Deo. 4, 1964 mwoz: zc

-4 INVENTOR.

ALICE TOUCHBERRY EMSJMM/lwmu ATTORNEY n United States Patent O 3,401,694 SYSTEM FOR CDLONIC THERAPY Alice Touchberry, 401 Worth Ave., Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 Filed Dec. 4, 1964, Ser. No. 415,973 8 Claims. (Cl. 12S- 227) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A system for colonic therapy employing a container through which liquid is continuously circulated. A conduit withdraws part of the liquid circulating through the container and supplies it to the patient. The container advantageously is a standpipe providing a constant pressure of liquid to the conduit for application to the patient. The conduit and container include a U-shaped passage below the level of the patient which serves to retain liquid to form a liquid seal, preventing air from passing into the patient from the container whenever the circulation of liquid through the container is halted. Liquid from a supply tank regulated to be of constant temperature may be circulated through the container; the circulation through the container maintains liquid at the conduit for application to the patient at the xed temperature.

This invention relates to colonic therapy, and more particularly to a system for supplying liquid for colonic irrigation. The invention is directed principally toward such a system in which liquid is supplied to a patient at constant pressure and temperature, with provision being made for the formation of a liquid seal in the supply line to prevent air from entering into the patient whenever the supply of liquid is halted.

In the treatment of intestinal disorders and the like by colonic irrigation, it is essential that medicinal liquid be supplied for irrigation at constant pressure and temperature so as to properly complete the treatment `and to avoid any distress to the patient caused by fluctuations in pressure and/or temperature. It is also necessary to prevent the entrance of air into the patient during a treatment, principally to avoid distress from gas pains.

Accordingly, an object of the invention is to provide a system for supplying liquid for colonic irrigation.

A further object of the invention is to provide for the supplying of liquid for colonic irrigation at constant pressure and temperature.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a system for supplying liquid for colonic irrigation, which includes means for forming a liquid seal to prevent the passage of air into a patient whenever the supply of liquid is halted.

The present invention accomplishes these and other objects in an illustrative embodiment of the invention which includes a container through which liquid for colonic irrigation is circulated. Typically, the container comprises a standpipe of predetermined height which is open to the atmosphere at its upper end. A portion of the circulating liquid is withdrawn from the standpipe through a conduit which is coupled to a ilexible tube which terminates in a nozzle adapted to be inserted into a patient. Portions of either or both the standpipe and the conduit are constructed so as to form a U-shaped passage which is positioned substantially below the level at which the patient is positioned for treatment. In this fashion, and when the patient is undergoing treatment, the U-shaped passage retains liquid therein in the event that the circulation of liquid through the standpipe is, for any reason, halted. The liquid seal so formed prevents air from entering into the conduit and thence into the patient from the standpipe which, as described above, is open to the atmos- "ice phere at its upper end. The height of the standpipe above the patient is chosen so as to provide the correct liquid pressure (determined by the height of the column of liquid in the standpipe) for treatment. Since the standpipe is xed, the liquid pressure is maintained constant without requiring the use of elaborate pressure regulating apparatus. Further, the circulation of liquid through the standpipe ensures a continuous fresh supply of liquid to the outlet conduit from the standpipe and maintains the liquid in the standpipe at a relatively constant temperature. In particular, the liquid is typically circulated from a large volume source whose temperature is maintained fairly constant. Since the standpipe is of relatively small volume, liquid therein, if unchanged and not of ambient temperature, would change to ambient temperature relatively rapidly. Circulation of liquid through the standpipe from the large volume source prevents such a temperature change.

Additionally, the arrangement may include a ow regulating valve in the outlet conduit from the standpipe for determining the rate of low of liquid to the patient at the particular pressure. The system may also include a pumping device for circulating liquid through the Standpipe, and an electrical switch may be employed controlled by the valve in the conduit so as to energize the pumping device only when the valve is open allowing liquid to flow through the conduit to the patient. Still further, the outlet conduit from the standpipe may include a check valve which allows liquid only to flow from the standpipe through the conduit into the patient, thereby preventing body liquid from flowing backwardly from the patient through the conduit into the standpipe.

rthe invention will be more completely understood hy reference to the following detailed description, which is to be read in conjunction with the appended drawing showing a representative system for supplying liquid for colonic irrigation in accordance with the invention.

Referring to the drawing, such a liquid Supply system includes a receptacle or supply tank 12 divided by a partition 14 into a larger compartment 16 and a smaller compartment 18. Typically, the two compartments hold diferent liquids, each of which is suitable `for colonic irrigation. A conduit 20 opens into the bottom of the compartment 16 and couples that compartment to a three-way valve 22. Similarly, a conduit 24 opens into the bottom of the compartment 18 and couples that compartment to the valve 22. An outlet conduit 26 from the valve connects the valve to a pump 28. The valve 22 includes an inner movable member 30 which contains a passage 32 therein. As shown in the drawing, the passage 32 couples the conduit 20v and hence the compartment 16 to the conduit 2-6 leading to the pump 28. When the valve member 30 is suitably moved, the passage 32 couples together the conduit 24 from the compartment 18 to the conduit 26 leading to the pump 28. Hence, depending upon t-he position of the valve member 30, liquid is supplied from one of the compartments 16 and 18 to the pump 28.

The pump 28 is coupled by a conduit 34 to a receptacle or supply standpipe 36. The conduit 34 advantageously enters into the standpipe through the lower end 38 thereof and extends upwardly within the standpipe. The upper end of the standpipe includes a horizonal segment 40 which leads into a vertically extending section 42. The section 42 is open to the atmosphere, as at 44, and the lower end of the section leads into a return conduit 46 coupled to another three-way valve 48 typically mounted on the partition 14 in the tank 12. The three-way valve includes an inner movable valve member l50 containing a passage 52 therein. The valve 48 includes outlet conduits 54 and 56 opening into the tank compartments 16 and 18, respectively. As shown in the drawing, the valve member 50 couples the conduit 46 to the outlet conduit 54 so as to return liquid from the standpipe to the compartment 16. When the valve member 50 is suitably moved, the passage 52 is positioned So as to couple the conduit 46 to the conduit 56 to return liquid from the standpipe to the compartment 18. The three-way valves 48 and 22 are typically coupled together, as represented by dashed line 58, so that the valve 22 receives liquid from a particular compartment to be pumped to the standpipe 36 and the valve 48 returns liquid from the standpipe to the same compartment.

The bottom end 38 of the standpipe 36 is coupled to a conduit `60, which includes a valve 62 therein and a vertically extending section 64 containing a check valve 66 therein. The vertically extending conduit section 64 leads into another conduit 68 which is terminated by a coupling 79 to which is connected a flexible tube 72. The tube 72 is terminated in a nozzle 74 which is adapted to be inserted into a patient positioned on a support table represented diagrammatically by dashed and dotted line 76. The table 76 typically is the same as the table shown in my Patents Nos. 2,506,183 and 2,564,135, although the liquid supply system described vherein is not limited to this particular table.

The portion of the standpipe 36 beneath the level of the opening of the conduit 34 into the standpipe, and the conduit 60 including the vertically extending section 64, together form a U-shaped passage 78 which serves to provide a liquid seal which prevents air from entering into a patient during a colonic irrigation operation. To elaborate, it will be noted that these portions of the system which dene the U-shaped passage are positioned below dashed line `80 which represents a patient positioned upon the support table 76. Hence whenever the nozzle 74 is inserted into the patient, it is always positioned above the U-shaped passage. In the event, then, that the circulation of liquid through the standpipe 36 from and to the tank 12 is halted, the standpipe can only empty down to the level at which the conduit 34 opens into the standpipe, inasmuch as the vertically extending conduit section 64 is roughly as high as this level. Hence a liquid seal is formed within the lower portion of the standpipe 36 and in the conduit 60 including the vertical section 64, which prevents air, which now lls the standpipe from the open end 44, from entering into the patient. If the nozzle 74 should ever be removed from the patient and dropped below the level of the conduit 60, liquid of course can drain from the U-shaped passage 78, destroying the liquid seal. However, the nozzle must be removed from the patient to destroy the seal. Hence in utilizing the system, it should be remembered that the nozzle, once having been dropped below this level, should not be reinserted into the patient unless the supply of liquid to the standpipe 36 has commenced again. If desired, provision may be made in the table 76 to prevent the nozzle 74 from ever being dropped below the level of the conduit 60 so as to prevent a liquid seal from ever being destroyed.

During the operation of the system, liquid is continuously pumped from one of the compartments 16 and 18 to the standpipe 36 and removed from the standpipe via the conduit 46 to be returned to the same compartment. This provides a constant supply of fresh liquid to the standpipe, a small portion of which is removed from the standpipe through the conduit `60. By circulating liquid continuously through the standpipe, the temperature of the liquid which is removed from the standpipe for application to the patient is maintained relatively constant. This is because the liquid is supplied from a relatively large volume source, i.e., one of the tank compartments 16 and 18, which is maintained at a fixed temperature. Since the standpipe 36 is of relatively small volume, unless the standpipe were insulated extremely well, the temperature of liquid Within the standpipe would change fairly rapidly if the liquid were not of ambient temperature and the liquid were allowed to remain unchanged in the standpipe. Circulation of the liquid through the Standpipe from the large volume source ensures that the liquid in the standpipe is of the relatively constant temperature of the source. The tank 12 is typically well insulated to achieve constant liquid temperature, and also may include a heating or cooling arrangement (not shown), if desired, to maintain constant the temperature of the liquid therein.

The height of the liquid in the standpipe 36 above the level of the nozzle inserted into the patient determines the pressure at which liquid is supplied for colonic irrigation to the patient. This, then, ensures a constant pressure for the treatment, since the standpipe height is xed, and elaborate pressure regulating apparatus is not required. The pressure is not dependent upon the pumping characteristics of the pump 2S, and hence any pumping rate will Sufiice, no matter how it may vary, which maintains the standpipe illed with liquid.

The amount of liquid withdrawn for colonic irrigation purposes is controlled by the valve 62, which typically includes .a coupling represented by dashed lines 81 connecting the valve to an electrical switch 82 that includes switch contacts 82a and 82b. The switch contacts 82a and 82h are respectively connected by electrical conductors 84a and 84b to the pump 2S to cont-rol the energization of the pump. Typically, the switch contacts 82a and 82h are open, thereby tie-energizing the pump, if the valve 62 is closed. When the valve 62 is open permitting liquid to ow therethrough, the switch contacts 82a and 82b are closed, thereby completing an electrical circuit to energize the pump 28 to circulate liquid through the standpipe.

The check valve 66 is advantageously included in the conduit section 64 to permit liquid to flow only in the direction of the arrow, i.e., from the standpipe 36 to the tube 72 and thence to the patient, and not from the patient back into the standpipe. This prevents body liquids from owing into the standpipe and contaminating the medicinal liquid circulating therethrough.

From the description above, it is apparent that the invention provides for the supplying of liquid for colonic irrigation purposes at constant pressure and temperature, with the maintenance `of a liquid seal to prevent the passage of air into a patient whenever the circulation of liquid in the system is halted. The embodiment described is, of course, susceptible of being modified by those skilled in the art. Accordingly, the invention should be :taken to be defined by the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In apparatus for colonic therapy, the combination of support means for supporting a patient for colonic therapy, a standpipe of predetermined height open at its upper end to the atmosphere, circulating means for circulating liquid through the standpipe, a conduit coupled to the standpipe for withdrawing liquid from the standpipe and supplying the withdrawn liquid to a patient, at least a portion of at least one of said standpipe and conduit deiining a U-shaped passage below the level of the patient on the support means which retains liquid to form a liquid seal preventing air from entering into the patient from the standpipe whenever the circulation of liquid through the standpipe is halted, valve means in said conduit for regulating the ilow of liquid through the conduit, and means respon.

sive to said valve means for controlling said circulating means.

2. Apparatus for colonic therapy as recited in claim 1, wherein said means responsive to Said valve means conltrols said circulating means so as to circulate liquidthrough said standpipe only when said valve means is open permitting liquid to pass through said conduit.

3. In apparatus for colonic therapy, the combination of support means for supporting a patient for colonic therapy, 'a supply tank containing a liquid for colonic therapy, a container coupled to the supply tank, means for circulating liquid from the supply tank to .and through the container and back to the supply tank, and -a conduit coupled to the container for withdrawing part of the liquid circulated through the container and supplying the Withdrawn liquid to the patient, at least a portion of at least one of said container and conduit defining a U-shaped passage which is positioned substantially below the level of the patient on the support means so as to retain liquid to form a liquid seal preventing air from entering into the patient from the container whenever the container is not supplied with liquid.

4. ln apparatus for colonic therapy, the combination of support means for supporting a patient for colonic therapy, a container having an inlet and an outlet, means for circulating liquid for colonic therapy through the container from the inlet to an outlet, and a conduit coupled to the container for withdrawing part of the liquid circulating through the container and supplying the Withdrawn liquid to the patient, at least a portion of at least one of said container and conduit defining a U-shaped passage which is positioned substantially below the level of the patient on the support means so as to retain liquid to form a liquid seal preventing air from entering into the patient from the container whenever the circulation of liquid through the container is halted.

S. In apparatus for colonic therapy, the combination of support means for supporting a patient for colonic therapy, a standpipe of predetermined height over the support means and having an inlet and an outlet and open at its upper end to the atmosphere, means for circulating liquid through the standpipe from the inlet to the outlet, and a conduit coupled to the standpipe for withdrawing part 0f the liquid circulating through the standpipe and supplying the withdrawn liquid to the patient, at least a portion of at least one of said standpipe and conduit defining a U- shaped passage which is positioned substantially below the level of the patient on the support means so as to retain liquid to form a liquid seal preventing air from entering into the patient from the standpipe Whenever the circulation of liquid through the standpipe is halted.

6. Apparatus as defined in claim 5, wherein the conduit includes a vertically extending segment which together with a lower portion of the standpipe forms said U- shaped passage.

7. In apparatus for colonic therapy, the combination of support means for supporting a patient for colonic therapy, a standpipe of predetermined height open at the upper portion thereof to the atmosphere, a iirst conduit coupled to the bottom portion of the standpipe, a second conduit coupled to the upper portion of the standpipe, a receptacle containing a quantity of liquid for colonic therapy and coupled to the lirst and second conduits and including liquid supplying means for supplying liquid to the first conduit to flow through the first conduit upwardly through the standpipe and out of the second conduit back into the receptacle thereby continuously circulating liquid through the standpipe, and a third conduit coupled to the standpipe below the opening of the irst conduit into the standpipe for withdrawing liquid from the standpipe and supplying the withdrawn liquid to a patient, said third conduit including a vertically extending segment which together with at least a portion of the standpipe below the opening Iof the first conduit into the standpipe serves to form a U-shaped passage below the level of the patient on the support means which retains liquid to form a liquid seal whenever the supply of liquid from the first conduit to the standpipe is halted.

8. In apparatus for colonic therapy, the combination of support means for supporting a patient for colonic therapy, a standpipe of predetermined height open at the upper portion thereof to the atmosphere, a first conduit coupled to the bottom portion of the standpipe, a second conduit coupled to the upper portion of the standpipe, a receptacle containin g a quantity of liquid for colonic therapy and coupled to the first and second conduits and including liquid supplying'means for supplying liquid to the first conduit to ow through the iirst conduit upwardly through the standpipe and out of the second conduit back into the receptacle thereby continuously circulating liquid through the standpipe, a third conduit coupled to the standpipe below the opening of the first conduit into the standpipe for withdrawing liquid from the standpipe and supplying the withdrawn liquid to a patient, said third conduit including a vertically extending segment which together with at least a portion of the standpipe below the opening of the first conduit into the standpipe serves to form a U-shaped passage below the level of the patient on the support means which retains liquid to form a liquid seal whenever the supply of liquid from the first conduit to the standpipe is halted, check valve means in said third conduit for permitting liquid to flow through the third conduit only from the standpipe and not to the standpipe, flow valve means in said third conduit for regulating the flow of liquid therethrough, and means responsive to said ow valve means to control said liquid supplying means so as to circulate liquid through said standpipe only when said valve means is open t0 permit liquid to pass through said third conduit.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,043,005 6/1936 Mayberry 12S-224 2,313,805 3/1943 Crawford et al. 128--227 2,396,043 3/1946 Evans 128-230 2,733,713 2/1956 Kabnick 128-230 2,908,273 10/1959 Huston 128-251 3,044,465 7/ 1962 Anderson et al 12S-230 3,288,140 11/1966 McCarthy 12S-248 2,506,183 5/1950 Touchberry 12S-33 FOREIGN PATENTS 50,507 12/1940 France. 876,363 8/1961 Great Britain.

CHARLES F. ROSENBAUM, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2043005 *Dec 24, 1934Jun 2, 1936Mayberry Frederick AColon irrigator
US2313805 *Nov 8, 1941Mar 16, 1943Crawford Boyd BColonic irrigator
US2396043 *Feb 15, 1943Mar 5, 1946E C D LtdDispensing apparatus
US2506183 *Sep 30, 1947May 2, 1950Alice TouchberryApparatus for colonic therapy
US2733713 *Oct 10, 1952Feb 7, 1956 kabnictf
US2908273 *Nov 7, 1956Oct 13, 1959John T HustonPower vaginal irrigator
US3044465 *May 8, 1958Jul 17, 1962AndermacMixing and dispensing apparatus
US3288140 *Oct 4, 1963Nov 29, 1966Mccarthy John JMeans for treating surface wounds
FR50507E * Title not available
GB876363A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3678932 *Mar 6, 1970Jul 25, 1972Hudall CorpSelf-contained internal hydrotherapy apparatus
US3823714 *Oct 2, 1973Jul 16, 1974J WaysilkMethod and apparatus for lavaging the lower intestinal tract
US6228048Oct 23, 1998May 8, 2001Cm Robbins Company Inc.Colonic irrigation apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/123, 604/151
International ClassificationA61M3/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2210/1064, A61M3/0287, A61M2205/3653
European ClassificationA61M3/02H4