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Publication numberUS3401933 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1968
Filing dateFeb 23, 1965
Priority dateFeb 23, 1965
Publication numberUS 3401933 A, US 3401933A, US-A-3401933, US3401933 A, US3401933A
InventorsConklin Robert M, Gretzky Anthony J, Robert Torresen
Original AssigneeBrunswick Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carom bowling game
US 3401933 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept 17, 196s R. M. CONKUN ETA.. 3,401,933

CAROM BOWLING GAME Filed Feb( 23, 1965 3 Sheets-Sheet l Sep@ 17 R. M. coNKLlN ETAL 3,401,933

CAROM BOWL ING GAME 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 23, 1965 sept. 17, 196s Filed Feb. 23, 1965 R. M. CONKLIN ETAL CAROM BOWLI NG GAME 25 Sheets-Sheet 5 146 197 0 6a 0f 6i l 1 L /M/ r L /M/ r TH PE Holm/v6 TAPE hw DING sw/rcf/ swf rc/f swlrcl/ PEL/)Y sw/rcf/ Pfl/IY -J64 Pam REMY vo/cara@ hva/C070@ Ffvffs/HLE REVERSE k/jz M0 TOF CONTROL United States Patent O 3,401,933 CAROM BOWLING GAME Robert M. Conklin, Robert Torresen, and Anthony J.

Gretzky, Muskegon, Mich., assignors to Brunswick Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Filed Feb. 23, 1965, Ser. No. 434,430 Claims. (Cl. 273-37) ABSTRACT 0F THE DISCLOSURE A convertible bowling lane including a bowling lane bed, at least one gutter extending along the side of the bed and including a ball receiving surface on one side thereof and ball deilecting means on the opposite side thereof together with means movably mounting the gutter for alternate movement between a position wherein the ball receiving surface is disposed to catch lballs leaving the bed and a ball deflecting position wherein the ball deecting means is disposed along the side of the bed to deflect balls coming in contact therewith, means for moving the gutter between the two positions and means for detecting and indicating when a ball has contacted the deflecting means.

A principal object of this invention is to provide a bowling lane that is readily convertible from a form suitable for conventional bowling to a form suitable for carom bowling.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a bowling lane including gutters along the sides thereof wherein the gutters have a ball catching portion suitable for conventional bowling and a ball deflecting portion that may be used in carom bowling, and means mounting the gutters for alternative movement between a conventional bowling position and a carom bowling position.

Another object of the invention is a provision in a bowling lane having ball deflecting means along the sides thereof suitable for carom bowling of means for detecting the contact of a ball with the ball deecting means and means for indicating when a ball has contacted the ball deecting means.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a bowling lane having ball deflecting means along the sides of the bed thereof and means mounting the ball deilecting means for alternative movement between an operative, extended position wherein the ball deflecting means will prevent a ball from leaving the bed, and inoperative, withdrawn position wherein a ball may be permitted to leave the bed.

Another object of the invention is the provision in a bowling lane having such movable ball deflecting means suitable for carom bowling of means for selectively moving the ball dellecting means to a carom bowling position and to a conventional bowling position.

Another object of the invention is the provision in a bowling lane including ball deflecting means for carom bowling of means for moving the ball deilecting means between an inoperative, conventional bowling position and an operative, carom bowling position comprising a selectively operable, reversible winch, cables connected to the winch and to sheaves operatively associated with the ball deflecting means, and limit switch means for deactuating the winch upon the ball deflecting means achieving either the operative or inoperative position thereof.

Another object of the invention is the provision in such bowling lane of curtain means secured to the lane and to the gutter to aid in maintaining the ball dellecting means in an operative, carom bowling position and to prevent 3,401,933 Patented Sept. 17, 1968 fiice foreign objects from lodging under the gutter when the latter is in the carom bowling position.

`Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

Description of the drawings FIGURE 1 is a plan view of a convertible bowling lane embodying a form of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a vertical section, taken approximately along the line 2-2 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a vertical elevation of a fragment of the convertible bowling lane as it appears from the foul line thereof;

FIGURE 4 is a plan view of a tensioning device having a portion broken away used in a form of the invention and a limit switch -associated therewith;

FIGURE 5 is a side elevation of a power means used in the invention and showing the details -of a limit switch therefor; and

FIGURE 6 is a block diagram of a control and indicating system for the convertible bowling lane.

Detailed description.

An exemplary form of a bowling lane made according to the invention, generally designated 10, is shown in FIGURE l. The lane 10 includes a planar, elongated bowling surface or bed 12 having an approach 13 and a foul line 14 at one end and a pin deck 16 at the other end. Gutters, generally designated 18, extend along either side of the bed 12 between the ends thereof. As each of the gutters 18 is substantially a mirror image of the other, only one will lbe described in detail.

Each gutter 18 comprises three abutting, independent, upwardly concave sections, each of which may be formed of one or more joined lengths of suitable construction. The first gutter section 20 is fixed relative to the bed 12 and extends a short distance from the foul line toward the pin deck. The second gutter section 22 is mounted to abut the tirst gutter section 20 and is movable relative to both the section 20 and the bed 12. The second gutter section 22 extends from its point `of abutment with the first section 20 along the majority of the length of the bed 12 to a point just short of the pin deck 16, where it terminates in an abutting relationship with a fixed third gutter section 24. The third gutter section 24 in turn extends from its point of abutment with the second section 22 to the pin deck end of the bed 12. The first `and third sections 20 and 24, respectively, are suitably formed to provide ball catching surfaces in anv well known manne-r.

As mentioned above, the second gutter section 22 is movably mounted in relation to the first and third gutter sections 20 and 24 and the bed 12. As best seen in FIG- URE 2, the second gutter section 22 comprises a member having an upper concave surface 26 suitably formed to catch bowling balls leaving the lane bed 12. The second gutter section 22 is supported in a suitable recess 28 formed between the bed 12 and a division rail 30 and is placed in the recess 28 such that a rst edge 32 thereof lies in a substantially abutting relationship with the side of the bed 12, while a second edge 34 is spaced therefrom and is adjacent the lane division ra'il 30. A plurality of suitable hinge brackets 35 are secured within the recess 28 at appropriate intervals adjacent the division 30. Complementary hinge brackets 36 are secured to the underside of the second gutter section 22 adjacent the second edge 34 by suitable securing means, not shown. Hinge pins 37 pivotally interconnect the brackets 35 and 36 such that the rst edge 32 of the second gutter section 22 may be alternatively swung above or below the plane of the bed 12 for movement between an operative position for carom bowling and an inoperative position wherein balls have free access to the concave surface 26, as will be seen hereinafter.

The underside of the gutter section 22 is formed with three downwardly open, C-shaped channels 38, 40 and 42, respectively. The first and second channels 38 and 40, respectively, are placed adjacent the edge 32 with the first channel 38 interposed between the edge 32 and the second channel 40. The third channel 42 is formed adjacent the edge 34.

Secured within the first channel 38 is a` -ball deecting means comprised of a generally trapezoidal elongated carom cushion 44, preferably formed from a resilient material such as rubber, which may be of a type having a low hysteresis loss to maximize elasticity of collision. Secured to the minor base of the carom cushion 44 is a wear strip 46, which may be formed of a deformable wear resisting material having a low co-efcient of friction, such as nylon or polytetrauoroethylene. The cushion 44 and the wear strip 46 form a generally triangular shape that extends toward the bed 12 (see FIGURE 3) from the gutter section 22 when the latter is raised for the purpose of detiecting balls coming in contact therewith to prevent such balls from leaving the bed 12. To detect the contacting of the carom cushion 44 and the wear strip 46 by a ball for such purposes as will hereinafter appear, there is provided a suitable recess 48 in the major Ibase of the carom cushion 44 which receives an elongated, normally open tape switch 50 that will be momentarily closed by a ball conta'cting the carom cushion 44.` The resulting signal will be utilized in a manner shown hereafter. The tape switch 50 is of a conventional variety, such as may be obtained from the Tapeswitch Corporation of America.

An elongated curtain 52 is interposed between the side of the bed 12 and the underside of the second gutter section 22 a'long the length of the latter, as shown in FIGURES 2 and 3. The opposite sides of the curtain 52 are provided with loops 54 and 56 which receive cords 58 and 60, respectively. The loop 56, bulged into a generally circular shape by the presence of the cord 60 therewithin, is received within the second channel 40 on the underside of the second gutter 22 and is precluded from leaving the channel 40 by virtue of its expanded size. The loop 54, which is similarly expanded by the cord 58, is secured to the side of the bed 12 below the plane thereof by a bracket 62 having a C-shaped channel 64 formed thereon for receiving the expanded loop 54. The bracket 62 is secured to the side of the bed 12 by suitable securing means, such as screws 66 (see FIGURE 2). The ends of the cord 60 are precluded from travelling through the length of the loop 56 by suitable clamping means. The clamping means (see FIGURE 2) comprise a threaded stud 68 secured to the underside of the second gutter section 22 and bearing a washer 70 and a nut 72. The end of the cord 60 is interposed between the washer 70 and the underside of the second gutter section 22 and clamped therebetween by tightening the nut 72. Similarly, clamping means (not shown) may be provided for the ends of the cord 58. The curtain positions and limits movement of the second gutter section 22 in a manner as will hereinafter appear.

Preferably the arrangement of the carom cushions 44 on the gutter sections 22, the placement of the hinge means 35, 36 and 37 in relation to the bed 12 and the width of the curtains 52 are such that each carom cushion 44 in the operative, carom bowling position is above the plane of the bed 12 a distance of about just more than one-half the diameter of a ball 135 (see FIGURE 3) and spaced from the edge of the bed 12 in the horizontal direction a distance of about just less than one-half of the diameter of a ball 135. Such an arrangement provides several benets. The horizontal displacement permits use of essentially the entire width of the -bed 12 while preventing the lowermost point of the ball 135 from leaving the bed 12 to wedge beneath the carom cushion 44 and/or dissipate a portion of its kinetic energy. The vertical displacement prevents the ball 135 from being caromed upwardly into the air to fly into an adjacent lane and minimizes the tendency of the ball to wedge between the underside of the carom cushion 44 and the bed surface 12 which would dissipate a portion of the balls kinetic energy.

The third channel 42 mounts a lever arm 74 (see FIGURE 2) which, as will appear, comprises a part of a mechanism for selectively moving the second gutter sec tion 22 between a conventional bowling position and a carom bowling position. The lever 74 includes a base 76 at one end thereof which is secured to a T-shaped member 78 received within the third channel 42 by securing means 79. At the end of the lever 74 remote from the base 76, there is mounted for rotation thereon, a sheave 80. A cable 82, which also is part of `the elevating mechanism, is passed about the sheave 80 for operation in a manner that will hereinafter appear. Additionally, a cable guard 84 partially surrounds the sheave 80.

Mounted for rotation on a bracket 86 which is secured within the recess 28 by bolts 88, is a pair of horizontal, non-aligned sheaves 90 and 92. The sheaves 90 and 92 are vertically spaced such that the upper sheave 90 may receive that portion of the cable 82 in contact with the upper edge of sheave 80 passed therearound while the lower sheave 92 receives the lower portion of the loop formed by cable 82 passing about the sheave 80. As best seen in FIGURE l, the sheaves 90 and 92 are also horizontally displaced such that the portion of the cable 82 passed about the sheave 90 will extend toward the foul line 14 while the portion of the cable S2 passed about the sheave 92 will extend toward the pin deck.

It will be appreciated that the undersides 0f the gutter member 22 support a plurality of levers 74 bearing sheaves 80 at suitably spaced points, as is schematically shown in FIGURE l. Adjacent the foul line end of the second gutter section 22 is a pair of independently rotatable sheaves 94. The end of the cable 82 passed about a sheave 90 and directed toward the foul line is passed about one of the pair of sheaves 94, about a lever mounted sheave 80, about the other of the pair of sheaves 94 and thence to a tensioning device 96 by which it is resiliently secured to the lane 10 within the recess 28. The end of the cable 82 directed toward the pin deck 16 is passed about a pulley 92 at the pin deck end of the second gutter section 22, and is passed about a sheave arrangement 98 to be directed beneath the xed third gutter section 24 to a winch 100. The arrangement of the second gutter section 22 on the opposite side of the alley is in all respects the mirror image of that just described except for the connection of the corresponding cable 83 to the winch 100. The cable 83 is drawn directly from a lever mounted sheave 80 beneath the bed 12 to a suitable sheave arrangement 102 adjacent the sheave arrangement 98. The cable 83 is then directed beneath the fixed third gutter section 24 in a parallel, side-by-side relationship with the cable 82 to the winch 100.

The winch 100 (see FIGURES l and 5) comprises a reversible motor 102 which is connected through a suitable set of reducing gears 104 to a rotatable drum 106. Preferably the drum 106 has on its outer periphery a set of spiral grooves (not shown) within which the cables 82 and 83 may be wound without overlapping. As shown in FIGURE l, the cables 82 and S3 are strung from the sheave arrangements 98 and 102 to the drum 106 and have their ends secured to the latter. By means of a control system to be described hereinafter, the reversible motor may be energized in opposite directions to alternatively wind the cables 82 and 83 upon the drum 106 or unwind the cables therefrom. In the case of the former, the length of cables 82 and 83 between the tensioning devices 86 and the sheave arrangements 98 and 102 is effectively shortened, thus drawing the lever mounted sheaves 80 toward the sheaves 90 and 92. This results in the second gutter section 22 being pivoted clockwise about the hinge pin 37, as seen in FIGURE 2, such that the edge 32 is brought above the plane of the bed 12. The edge 32 of the second gutter section 22 will be drawn upwardly by the winch 100 until the curtain 52 becomes taut between the underside of the second gutter section 22 and the side of the bed 12 to prevent further movement of the second gutter sections 22 past the carom bowling position. At this point, the second gutter section 22 is in an operative, carom bowling position wherein the carom cushion 44 is presented to the bed 12, as may be seen in FIGURE 3, and the motor 102 is deenergized by means to be hereinafter described. The carom cushion 44 so raised is above the plane of the bed 12 and is adjacent the edge of the latter such that balls tending to leave the bed 12 will contact the carom cushion 44 and be deilected or caromed back toward the center of the ybed 12 or toward the carom cushion 44 on the opposite side of the bed 12. To move the second gutter section 22 and the carom cushion 44 from a carom bowling position to an inoperative, conventional bowling position wherein the concave surface 26 is exposed beside `the bed 12, it is only necessary to energize the reversible motor 102 in the opposite direction whereupon the cables 82 and 83 will be unwound from the drum 106 and the second gutter section 22 will pivot counterclockwise, as seen in FIG- URE 2, under its own weight to the conventional bowling position.

Since the end of the second gutter section 22 adjacent the foul line could be struck by an errantly directed ball when in its carom bowling position, and thus result in severe marring of the ball, the foul line end of the second gutter section 22 is cut diagonally inwardly toward the bed 12 such that a ball striking the end of the second gutter section 22 will be deflected toward the bed 12 and will not strike the foul line end in a direction normal thereto. This construction is best seen in FIG. 1.

Turning now to FIGURE 3, it will be seen that additional precautions are taken to preclude damaging contact between a ball and the end of the second gutter section 22. A plate 108 of substantially greater width than the thickness of the second gutter section 22 depends from the end of the latter such that an errantly directed ball will contact a rather wide plate 108 rather than a sharp edge of the second gutter section 22.

There is provided a continuation 110 (see FIGURE 3) of the curtain 52 which acts as a closure for the space between the curtain 52, the second gutter section 22 when the latter is in the carom bowling position and the recess 218. The lower end of the curtain continuation 110 is provided `with a loop 11.2 through which a cord 114 is strung. The ends of the cord 114 protruding from the ends of the curtain continuation loop 112 are secured within the recess 28 by suitable means 116. In this manner, the curtain continuation 110 is secured at its lower edge. To secure the edge of the curtain continuation 110 adjacent the end of the second gutter section 22 to the latter, suitable connecting means, such as heavy duty staples, not shown, are provided. It will be apparent that the curtain 52 and its continuation 110 serve the dual function of enclosing the recess 28 to preclude the entry of foreign objects that could prevent the second gutter section 22 from seating properly when in the conventional bowling position or interfere with the second gutter section raising and lowering mechanism, and additionally maintain the second gutter section 22, and accordingly the caro-m cushion 44, in a proper attitude relative to the bed 12 when the former elements are in a carom bowling position.

Turning now to FIGURE 4, there is seen a detailed view of the tensioning means 96 and an associated limit switch mechanism for de-energizing the reversible motor 102 when the second gutter sections 22 have reached a carom bowling position. The tensioning means 96 comprises an elongated hollow cylinder 118 having inwardly directed flanges 119 at one end and longitudinally extending opposed slots 120 and 122 adjacent the other end thereof. Received within the slots and `122 for movement therein is a switch actuator pin 124. A rod 126 has one end connected to the portion of the switch actuator pin 124 within the cylinder 118, and bears at its opposite end, which extends outwardly from the cylinder 118, an eye 128 to which the cable 82 or the cable 83 is attached. The-rod 126 passes `through an apertured guide washer 129 which abuts the flanges 119 within the cylinder 118 and ser-ves to position the rod 126 within the cylinder. Interposed between the portion of the switch actuator pin 124 within the cylinder 118 and the guide vwasher 129 is a compression spring 130 which biases the switch actuator pin 124 toward the end of the slot 120 and 122 remote from the inturned tianges 119. The spring 130 is chosen such that the switch actuator pin 124 will remain in a switch closing position when the rod 126 is subjected to tension by the weight of the second gutter sections 22, but will move to a switch opening position when the tension exerted is greater than that caused by the weight of the second gutter sections 22. Accordingly, when the cable 82 or 83 exerts little or no tension on the eye 128 and the rod 126, the switch actuator pin 124 is biased to substantially the position shown in FIGURE 4.

Mounted adjacent the tensioning means 96y is a normally open switch 132 having an Ioperator 134. The switch 132 is mounted such that its operator 134 is in Contact with the switch actuator pin 124 when the rod 126 is not subject to tension. Additionally, when the switch actuator pin 124 is in contact with the switch operator 134, the switch 132 is closed. Thus, when the switch actuator pin 124 is moved to the right (referring to FIG- URE 4) due to tension exerted on the rod 126, it will no longer contact the switch operator 134 and the switch 132 will assume its normally open position. The switching action caused by movement of the switch actuator pin 124 serves a limit switching purpose for de-energizing the reversible motor `102 on such occasions as will hereinafter appear.

In FIGURE 5 there is shown a detailed View of a second limit switching arrangement. Rotatably mounted on the output shaft 136 of the reduction gear train 104 is a lever 138. Mounted tranversely on the upper end of thel lever 138 is an arm 140 which extends across the length of the drum 106 and is arranged to rest on the length of the cables 82 and y83 extending between the sheave arrangements 9'8 and 102 and the drum 106. A resilient arm 142 rests on the upper surface of the arm 140 and is secured to the reduction gear train housing 104. The resilient arm 142 is engaged by a switch operator 144 for a normally open switch 146. As may :be seen in FIGURE 5, when the cables 82 and 83 are taut, the lever arm 140 is maintained in a relatively upper position and in turn, maintains the resilient arm 142 in a similar position. The resilient ar-m 142 bearing against the switch operator 144 causes the switch 146 to assume a closed position during such times as the cables 82 and 83 are taut, i.e. all positions of the second gutter sections 22 except the conventional bowling position. However, when the cables 82 and 83 slacken due to the second gutter sections 22 achieving a conventional bowling position, they will tend to drop somewhat, thus permitting the arm 140, and the resilient arm 142 to descend to a -relatively lower position. Accordingly, the switch operator 144 will Ibe permitted to extend somewhat thus permitting the switch 146 to achieve its normally open position. By means of a control system described below, the resulting opening of the switch 146 de-actuates the reversible motor 102.

A suitable form of control is shown in FIGURE 6'. Basically, the control comprises a pair of systems for alternatively energizing the reversible motor 102. The rst system for extending the second gutter Sections 22 to an operative position for carom bowling includes a manually operable extend control 150. Additionally, there is provided an energizing relay 154 for the reversible motor 102 and a reverse control 152. The reverse control 152 may be of the relay type wherein a relay, when de-ener gized, presents the poles of the reversible motor 102 in a predetermined manner to a source of power, and when energized, reverses the connection of the poles of the reversible motor 102 to the power source. When the eX- tend control 150 is actuated, the reverse control 152 is actuated thus `connecting the poles of the reversible motor to the relay 154 in one predetermined manner. Simultaneously, therewith, the relay 154 is energized and permits power to flow from a source 148 to the reversible motor if the limit switch 132 is closed, It will be recalled that when there is little or no tension exerted on the rod 126 of the tensioning means 96, the limit switch 132 will be closed. Since the second gutter Sections 22 are in a conventional bowling position, tension is not being exerted on the cables 82 or 83 and thus tension is not exerted on the rod 126 of the tensioning means 96 and the switch 132 is closed. Accordingly, the reversible motor will be energized in one direction and will draw the cables 82 and 83 toward the drum 106 to be wound thereon, to raise the second gutter sections 22 to the carom bowling position. When the second gutter sections 22 have reached the carom bowling position and are restrained from further movement by the curtains 52, continued energization of the reversible motor 102 will cause the tension of the cables 82 and 83 to increase above that produced by the weight of the second gutter sections 22 thus drawing the rod 126 of the tensioning means 96 to the right, in reference to FIGURE 4. At some point in this movement the switch actuator pin 124 will cease to contact the switch operator 134 of the switch 132 thus permitting the latter to open. The opening of the limit switch 132 will then de-energize the relay 154 and accordingly stop the reversible motor 102.

Generally, the friction and inertia present in the reduction gear train 104 will be suliicient to preclude the drum 106 from unwinding the cables 82 and 83 under the inuence of the weight of the second gutter sections 22 and cause the latter to prematurely retract. However, should such friction and inertia not be suiiciently great such that the drum 106 begins to unwind the cables, the accompanying reduction of the tension exerted on the rod 126 of the tension means 96 will permit the switch actuating pin 124 to move back to a switch closing position to close and re-energize the reversible motor 102. Since the reverse control 152 is continually energized when the extend control 150 is actuated, such a re-closing of the limit switch 132 will energize the reversible motor 102 in the proper direction to maintain the second gutter sections 22 in the carom bowling position.

The second system of the control for moving the second gutter sections 22 comprises a retract control 156, the limit switch 146 and a motor energizing relay 158. The retract control 156 is mechanically or electrically interlocked with the extend control 150 so that only one of the two controls may be actuated at any given time. Thus, when the retract control 156 is energized, the extend control 150 and the reverse control 152 are Ide-energized, thus reversing the connection of the poles of the reversible motor 102 presented to the power source 148. Accordingly, the reversible motor may be energized in the opposite direction by power from source 148 through relay 158 which has been energized by the actuation of the retract control 156 if the limit switch 146 is closed. As mentioned above, the limit switch 146 is maintained in a closed position whenever the cables 82 and 33 are taut or subject to tension. Since the second gutter sections 22 are in a carom bowling position and it is desired to retract them to a conventional bowling position, it will be appreciated that the cables 82 and 83 are taut and, accordingly, switch 146 is closed. As a result, the reversible motor will be energized in the opposite direction thus causing t'ne druml 106 to unwind the cables 82 and 83 and permitting the second gutter sections 22 to lower under their own weight. When the second gutter sections 22 have reached a fully lowered position, the cables 82 and 83 are no longer supporting the weight thereof, and slacken. Accordingly, arm and resilient arm 142 descend somewhat and limit switch 146 is opened thereby de-energizing relay 158 to stop the reversible motor 102.

Also connected to the power source 148 is an indicating system including the detecting means comprising the tape switch 50. ln actuality, there is a separate tape switch in each of the carom cushions 44 on either side ofthe bed 12. As seen in FIGURE 6, one such tape switch is designated 50 while the other is designated 50. The indicating system comprises a pair of holding relays 160 and 162 which are momentarily energized by the closing of the normally open tape switches 50 and 50', respectively, due to contact of a ball with the carom' cushions 44. Each of the relays 160 and 162 is arranged to maintain itself closed once it has been momentarily energized. When the holding relay 160 is closed by a momentary pulse from the tape switch 50, power is permitted to pass from the source 148 to an indicator 164, which may be a conventional light source, to energize the latter. The holding relay 162 and tape switch 50 function in a similar manner to energize a similar second indicator 166. ln order to reset the indicators 164 and 166 between rolls of the ball, there is provided a common reset device 168 which may be a switch for disrupting the energizing current of the holding relays 160 and 162. The reset 168 may be placed adjacent a scoring table or the like, or, if desired, can be placed in the mechanism for an automatic pinsetter such that the indicators 164 and 166 will be reset whenever the pinsetter reaches a certain stage in its operation.

Since the holding relays 160 and 162 are operated by independent tape switches 50 and 50', respectively, the indicator 164 may be used to indicate the caroming of the ball ott the carom cushion 44 on the right side of the bed 12 while the indicator 166 may be used to indicate the caroming of a ball off the carom cushion 44 on the left side of the bed 12. Thus, when a carom bowling game involving bonuses for pin fall achieved by caroming the ball off one or both sides of the bed 12 is played, the indicators 164 and 166 may be placed in the masking unit for a pinsetter and provide a reliable indication of the carom cushions contacted by a ball.

Having disclosed a specic embodiment of our invention, we do not intend that our invention be limited to the speciiic construction set forth, but rather, construed broadly according to the true spirit thereof as set forth in the following claims.

We claim:

1. A convertible bowling lane comprising:

(a) a bowling lane bed having a foul line at one end and a pin deck at the other end thereof,

('b) a pair of elongated, concave gutters each having a first edge extending along and adapted to substantially abut either side of said bed `between the ends thereof and second edge spaced from said bed,

(c) means pivotally mounting a least the portions of said gutters intermediate the ends of said bed at said second edge such that said first edge may be alternatively swung above said bed to an operative position for carom bowling, and to an inoperative position to serve as a gutter adjacent said bed,

(d) a pair of curtains,

(e) rst means securing one side of each of said curtains to a side of said bed below the plane thereof,

(f) second means securing the other side of each of said curtains to the underside of the adjacent gutter adjacent said first edge.

(g) resilient cushion means secured to the underside of each of said gutters 'between said second securing `means and said lirst edge, said cushion means projecting outwardly `from the undersides of said gutters,

(h) lever means secured to the underside of each of said gutters adjacent said second edge,

(i) means for selectively raising or lowering said first edge, said cushion means and said curtains comprising a reversible motor operable in opposite directions and operatively connected to said lever means, energizing means for selectively actuating said motor means in either of said directions, first motor deenergizing means for deactuating said motor when said gutters are in said lgutter position, and second motor de-energizing Ltneans for de-actuating said motor when said gutters are in said carom bowling position;

(j) means operatively associated with each of said cushion means for detecting the contact of a bowling ball with said cushion means, and

(k) means responsive to said detecting means for indicating which of said cushion means have been contacted by a bowling ball.

2. A convertible bowling lane comprising a bowling lane fbed, at least one elongated gutter extending along and adapted to substantially abut aside of said bed, means mounting said gutter for alternative movement to an operative position above the bed for carom bowling, and to an inoperative position to serve as a gutter adjacent said bed, at least one curtain, means securing said curtain to said bed, and to said gutter, resilient cushion means secured to said gutter, said cushion means projecting outwardly from said gutter, means operatively associated with said gutter for selectively moving said gutter, said cushion means and said curtain to said inoperative gutter position and to said operative, carom bowling position, means operatively associated with said cushion means for detecting the contact of a bowling ball with said cushion means, and means responsive to said detecting means for indicating that said cushion means has been contacted *by a bowling ball.

3. A convertible bowling lane comprising a bowling lane bed having at least one elongated gutter extending along and adapted to substantially abut a side of said bed, means mounting said gutter for alternative movement to an operative position above the bed for carom bowling, and to an inoperative position to serve `as a gutter adjacent said bed, means for preventing movement of said gutter past said operative position, ball cushioning means secured to said gutter and positionable adjacent said bed to be `struck by balls when said gutter is in said operative position, and means operatively associated with said gutter for selectively moving said gutter and said cushion means to said inoperative, gutter position and to said operative, carom bowling position.

4. A convertible bowling lane comprising. a bowling lane bed, at least one gutter extending along a side of said bed and including ball catching means and ball deecting means, means movably mounting said gutter for alternative movement between a ball catching position wherein said ball catching means will catch balls leaving said bed and a ball defiecting position wherein said ball defiecting means may deiiect balls on said bed whereby said bed may be selectively used for bowling or carom bowling, means for detecting the contact of a ball with said ball deliecting means, and means responsive to said detecting ymeans for indicating when a -ball has contacted said deecting means.

5. A convertible bowling lane comprising: a bowling lane Ebed, at least one `guttter extending along a side of said bed and including ball catching means and ball deecting means, rneans movably lmounting said gutter for alternative movement between a ball catching position and a ball deecting position whereby said lbed may be selectively used for bowling or carom bowling, and means for selectively moving said gutter to said ball catching position and to said ball deliecting position.

6. A convertible bowling lane comprising; *a bowling lane bed, at least one gutter extending along a side of said bed and including ball catching means and ball deliecting means, means movably mounting said gutter for alternative movement between a ball catching position and a ball deflecting position whereby said bed may be selectively used for bowling or carom bowling, and gutter movement limiting means secured to said bed and to said gutter.

7. A convertible bowling lane comprising: a bowling lane bed, at least one gutter extending along a side of said bed and including ball catching means and ball deflecting means, and means movably mounting said gutter for alternative movement between a ball catching position and a -ball deflecting position whereby said bed may be selectively used for bowling or carom bowling.

8. A convertible bowling lane comprising: a bowling lane bed, an elongated rail extending along at least one side of said bed, elongated ball deilecting means mounted on said rail and positionable adjacent said side of the bed and above the bed, means mounting said rail and said deflecting means for movement of said deflecting means back and forth between a first, operative position adjacent and above said bed for -defiecting a ball to prevent it from leaving said 'bed for carom bowling, and a second, inoperative position adjacent said bed for permitting a ball on said bed to leave said Ibed, whereby said bowling lane may be alternatively used for bowling or carom bowling, means for `detecting the contact of a ball with said deflecting means, and means responsive to said detecting means yfor indicating when a ball has contacted said defiecting means.

9. Means for adapting a bowling lane having a bed for alternative use as a conventional 4bowling lane having a gutter along a side thereof and as a carom bowling lane comprising: an elongated resilient carom cushion positionable adjacent a side of the bed and above the bed, and means for mounting said carom cushion for back and -forth movement between a first, operative position adjacent ,and above said -bed and to the side thereof for deliecting a ball to prevent it from leaving the bed whereby the lane may be used for carom bowling, and a second position away from said side so that balls may leave said bed by passing ofir said side for conventional bowling, motor means remote from said bed and said gutter, and means interconnecting said motor means and said carom cushion for transmitting motion from said motor means to said carom cushion for selectively moving said carom cushion between said first and second positions.

10. A bowling lane comprising: an elongated bowling lane bed having an upper playing surface, two ends and two elongated sides, at least one elongated carom cushion extending generally parallel to one of said sides .and having a bowling ball contacting surface presented to said bed, and means mounting said carom cushion along said one side and above said playing surface so that the horizontal distance between said one side and said bowling ball contacting surface is just less than 'one half the diameter of a bowling ball to be used therewith and the vertical distance between said playing surface and said bowling ball contacting surface is just greater than onehalf the diameter of a bowling ball to be used therewith.

11. A convertible bowling lane structure comprising: an elongated bowling lane bed having an elongated side; an elongated lane division rail spaced from said side and defining, together with said side, a gutter area for receipt of bowling balls leaving said lane bed; an elongated carom railing alternately disposable at a first position above said bed and said gutter area for carom -bowling and at a second position whereat said gutter area is unobstructed; means, including a stationary element spaced from said side and associated with said lane division rail, mounting said carom rail for bidirectional, back and forth movement between said first and second positions; and motor means selectively operable to move said carom rail relative to said stationary element back and forth between said first and second positions.

12. A convertible bowling lane comprising: an elongated bowling lane bed having a side; elongated ball deecting means positionable adjacent the side of said bed and above the bed; means mounting said detlecting means for movement back and forth between a first, operative position adjacent and above said bed for deflecting a ball to prevent it from leaving said bed for carom bowling, ,and a second, inoperative position adjacent said bed for permitting `a ball on said lbed to leave said bed, said mounting means including an element stationarily mounted at a point outside of the vertical projection of said bed on a horizontal plane and a movable element secured to said stationary element for movement with respect thereto; means interconnecting said deecting means and said movable element and means for selectively moving said deecting means between said rst land said second position whereby said lane bed may be selectively used for carom and conventional bowling respectively.

13. Means for adapting a bowling lane having a bed for alternative use as a conventional bowling lane and as a carom bowling lane comprising: an eiongated carom cushion positionable adjacent a side of the bed and above the bed, and means for mounting said carom cushion for movement between a first, operative position adjacent and above said bed for deecting a ball to prevent it from leaving the bed whereby the lane may be used for carom bowling, and a second, inoperative position for permitting a ball to leave the bed whereby the lane may be used for conventional bowling further comprising a gutter adapted to substantially abut the bed; said gutter including ball catching means adapted to be presented to the bed for conventional bowling when said carom cushion is in said second position, and ball detlecting means adapted to be presented to the bed when said carom cushion is in said first position.

14. Means -for adapting a bowling lane having a bed for alternative use as a conventional bowling lane ,and as a carom bowling lane comprising: an elongated carom cushion positionable adjacent a side of the bed and above the bed, and means for mounting said carom cushion for movement 4between a rst, operative position adjacent and above said bed for deecting a ball to prevent it from leaving the bed whereby the lane may be used for carom bowling, and a second, inoperative position for permit ting a ball to leave the bed whereby the lane may be` used for conventional bowling further including means for detecting the contact of a ball with said carom cushion and means responsive to said detecting means for indigatng that said carom cushion has been contacted by la al 1S. A carom bowling lane comprising: an elongated bowling lane bed; an elongated resilient carom cushion formed of a rubber-like material having a low hysteresis loss to maximize the elasticity of a collision between the same and a Vbowling ball rolled on said bed to deiiect the ball from said cushion, said cushion further including a Iball contacting portion formed of a Wear resistant plastic having a low coeicient of friction and being located above said bed and extending along a major portion of a side thereof and positioned to prevent balls from leaving said bed; means including Ian elongated switch abutting 'said cushion along substantially the entire length thereof for detecting the contacting of said cushion by a ball at any location along substantially the entire length of the cushion; and means responsive to said detecting means for indicating when said cushion has been contacted by a ball at any location along substantially the entire length of the cushion.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,099,419 6/1914 Beatty. 1,124,365 1/1915 Virgien 273-37 2,628,103 2/1953 Parmer 273-126 2,676,016 4/1954 Whipple et al. 273-43 2,911,218 11/1959 Scherzinger 273-43 3,091,457 5/1963 Mentzer et al 273-54 3,193,290 7/1965 Dowd et al. 273-43 1,945,038 1/1934 Hand 273-9 3,046,012 7/ 1962 Marx 273-54 3,050,306 8/1962 Blough 273-42 3,091,458 5/1963 Becks 273-54 FOREIGN PATENTS 230,237 11/ 1963 Austria.

ANTON O. OECHSLE, Primary Examiner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification473/109, 473/113
International ClassificationA63D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63D5/00, A63D2005/003
European ClassificationA63D5/00