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Publication numberUS3402411 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 24, 1968
Filing dateJan 12, 1966
Priority dateJan 12, 1966
Also published asDE1685307A1
Publication numberUS 3402411 A, US 3402411A, US-A-3402411, US3402411 A, US3402411A
InventorsHanson Alden Wade
Original AssigneeHanson Alden Wade
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process for making boots, sports equipment and hats
US 3402411 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,402,411 PROCESS FOR MAKING BOOTS, SPORTS EQUIPMENT AND HATS AldenWade Hanson, 1605 W. St. Andrews, A Midland, Mich. 48640 No Drawing. Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 380,975, June 22, 1964. This application Jan. 12, 1966,

Ser. No. 535,257

Claims. (Cl. 12-142) The present invention relates to ski boots and similar sports shoes wherein rigid encasement of the ankle part of the foot is accomplished by the use of a thixotropic material to encircle the ankle portion thereof. Additionally, the present invention relates to an improved grip for sports equipment and the like, as well as improved bands for hard hats and football helmets.

This application is a continuation-in-part of a prior-filed application Ser. No. 380,975 filed June 22, 1964 now US. Patent 3,237,319, which in turn was a continuation-in-part of a prior-filed application Ser. No. 249,062, filed Jan. 2, 1963 and now abandoned.

In my patent application Ser. No. 380,975 filed June 22, 1964, there is described the use of a high-viscosity flowable material resistant to rapid deformation material as an ankle encasement for ski boots and similar sport shoes. However, the use of these materials has the disadvantage that upon storing the ski boot or similar sport shoe, the material tends to deform or sag, with the result that the next time the shoe or boot is Worn, some time is involved in again molding the material to a comfortable fit.

It has now been found that the use of a material having (a) a minimum yield point of at least 4 grams per square centimeter,

(b) a viscosity between about 100,000 and about 40,000,-

000 poises at 0 F. and at 80 F.

(c) is formable by finger pressure,

(d) is substantially inert to leather or polyvinylchloride,

(e) not significantly changing in volume in response to ambient temperatures and (f) has a nominal thickness between about 0.04 inch to 0.6 inch (hereinafter called formable stable material) in the ankle encasement portion of a ski boot or similar sport shoe will conform to the shape of the ankle encased upon continuously applied pressure, but will not deform upon instantaneously applied pressure, and will not noticeably sag upon storing. Formable stable material may also be characterized by retaining its shape for several days when formed into an arch about 3 inches wide and 2 inches high the material being cylindrical approximately /2 inch in diameter. Formable stable material responds to instantaneous pressure in the same manner as a solid, but responds to continuously applied pressure as a liquid. Yield point is a characteristic of a Bingham plastic, that is, resisting flow until the shear stress applied has exceeded some minimum. After the yield point is reached, the formable stable materials utilized in the present invention flow under shear stress in a Newtonian, dilatant or thixotropic manner, within the viscosity ranges above set forth.

The formable stable materials when employed in the same manner of Ser. No. 380,975 filed June 22, 1964, which specification is hereby specifically incorporated herein, have all of the advantages of that invention with the additional advantage of not significantly changing shape upon storage.

A preferred formable stable material contains-- (a) 25% by weight polyisobutylene having a molecular weight range between 8,000 and 200,000 (Staudinger method in diisobutylene at C.).

3,402,41 1 Patented Sept. 24, 1968 (b) 25% by weight of an inertoil, e.g., mineral oil or a saturated ester oil or a mixture thereof.

(0) 50% by weight of inorganic filler, primarily calcium carbonate and titanium dioxide. Any conventionalinorganic filler for plastics can be used, however a mixture of calcium carbonate and titanium dixode is preferred. 1 i

This material is available today as lPlasfi-tak manufactured by Brooks Manufacturing Company, Incorporated, 1051 Meredith Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio. A desired form is Plasti-tak Flofit H7A.

Another preferred material will contain 20% by weight polyisobutylene, 37.5% by weight inert oil and 42.5% by weight inorganic filler. Of course, other ranges of ingredients can be utilized provided they meet the definition requirements of formable stable materials. An increase in the amount of oil will further reduce the yield point and viscosity while an increase in the inorganic material will increase the viscosity and yield point.

Even when boots utilizing such formable stable materials are stored over the summer no sagging will occur. This is in direct contrast to the polydimethylsiloxane, or the stereospecific polybutadiene specifically disclosed in Ser. No. 380,975 which will usually sag when stored only one week.

While a minimum yield point of at least about 4 grams per square centimeter has been presented, it is to be understood that a minimum yield point of at least about 20 grams per square centimeter is preferred, Similarly, a viscosity between about 500,000 and about 3,000,000 poises at 0 F. and F. is preferred.

Pads of formable stable material have also been found to have advantageous utility as the grip or body contacting portion of sports equipment such as golf clubs, pistol grips, baseball bats, camera grips, tennis racquets, ski poles, gun stocks, and the like. Such use of the pad of formable stable material replaces the sponge rubber or other flexible material normally employed in the handles of golf clubs. The pad of formable stable material is wrapped around the shaft and covered with polyvinyl chloride, leather, buckskin or like sheet material in a manner so as to look like a conventional golf club. When the player grips the handle of the club and holds it securely for a few minutes, it will be found to conform exactly to the shape of his personal grip. Excellent comfort and control are thereby achieved. And, the grip will maintain its configuration between shots. Yet, if the hand swells, or another player desires to use the clubs, just a few minutes of holding the club in a players grip will modify the grip to fit the new conditions. Similarly, the formable stable material can be used in the other applications mentioned above.

Another application for the formable stable material utilized in the present invention is in the bands of hard hats (safety hats), or football helmets. These hats have a hard outside and an inside support band designed to keep the hard outside away from the head while at the same time supporting the hard outside.

In this application the interior (head-contacting) bands of such hats are made from leather or vinyl or other support material covering a strip of formable stable material. With such a construction, a better fit is achieved and the hat will stay in place easily.

Various modifications may be made in thef present invention without departing from the spirit or scope thereof, and it is to be understood that I limit myself only as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a process of making a boot having a pressure compensating ankle support that covers the sides and back of the ankle of the wearer including the steps of providing a flexible protective ankle support shaped envelope, sealing a high viscosity material in said envelope and assembling said sealed envelope and boot, said high viscosity material not substantially changing in volume responsive to ambient temperature changes, having a nominal thickness of about 0.04 inch to about 0.6 inch, being resistant to flow in response to intantaneously applied pressure but responding to continuously applied pressure to provide pressure on those portions of the ankle that can best withstand -it and to allow portions of the ankle momentarily to move away from pressure, and having (a) a minimum yield point of at least 4 grams per square centimeter and (b) a viscosity between about 100,000 and about 40,-

000,000 poises at F. and 80 F.

2. The improved process of claim 1, wherein such high viscosity material has a minimum yield point of about 50 grams per square centimeter and a viscosity between about 500,000 and about 3,000,000 poises at 0 F. and 80 F.

3. The improved process of claim 1 wherein such high viscosity material is a mixture of polyisobutylene, mineral oil and inorganic filler.

4. The improved process of claim 1 wherein such high viscosity material is a mixture of about 25% by weight polyisobutylene, about 25% by weight mineral oil and about 50% by weight inorganic tiller.

5. The improved process of claim 1 wherein such high viscosity material is a mixture of about 20% by weight polyisobutylene, about 37.5% by weight inert oil and about 42.5% by weight inorganic filler.

6. In a process of making sports equipment having a handle adapted to be encircled by a players hand, including the steps of providing a forma'ble stable material having a nominal thickness of about 0.04 inch to about 0.6 inch, having a minimum yield point of at least about 4 grams per square centimeter, and a viscosity between about 100,000 and about 40,000,000 poises at 0 F. and 80 F., encasing said formable stable material within a flexible non-porous sheet material and assembling said handle and encased material.

7. The improved process of claim 6 wherein the formable stable material has a minimum yield point of about grams per square centimeter and a viscosity between about 500,000 and about 3,000,000 poises at 0 F. and 80 F.

8. The improved process of claim 6, wherein the formable stable material is a mixture of polyisobutylene, mineral oil and inorganic filler.

9. The improved process of claim 6 wherein the formable stable material is a mixture of about 25% by weight polyisobutylene, about 25% by weight mineral oil and about by weight inorganic filler.

10. The improved process of claim 6 wherein the formable stable material is a mixture of about 20% by weight polyisobutylene, about 37.5 percent by weight inert oil and about 42.5% by weight inorganic filler.

11. In a process of making a hat having a hard outside member and an inside support band, providing a formable stable plastic material having a nominal thickness of about 0.04 to about 0.6 inch, having a minimum yield point of at least about 4 grams per square centimeter, and a viscosity between about 100,000 and about 40,000,000 poises at 0 F. and F., covering said formable material with a support band, and assembling into a hat said support band with said outside member.

12. The improved process of claim 11 wherein the formable stable material has a minimum yield point of about 50 grams per square centimeter and a viscosity between about 500,000 and about 3,000,000 poises at 0 F. and 80 F.

13. The improved process of claim 11 wherein the formable stable material is a mixture of polyisobutylene, mineral oil and inorganic filler.

14. The improved process of claim 11 wherein the formable stable material is a mixture of about 25% by weight polyisobutylene, about 25% by weight mineral oil and about 50% by weight inorganic filler.

15. The improved process of claim 11 wherein the formable stable material is a mixture of about 50% by weight polyisobutylene, about 37.5% by weight inert oil and about 42.5 by weight inorganic filler.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,431,878 12/1947 McGregor et al 260-465 2,531,763 11/1950 Andre 362.5 2,546,827 3/1951 Lavinthal 12'8595 2,571,039 10/1951 Hyde 26037 2,641,066 6/1953 Filardo ]28594 2,760,281 8/1956 Cosin 128-595 2,830,585 4/1958 Weiss 36-71 X 2,854,974 10/1958 Ashton et a1 128-153 2,884,646 5/1959 Alber 3671 X 2,913,837 11/1959 Geuder 36-71 X PATRICK D. LAWSON, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2431878 *Mar 30, 1943Dec 2, 1947Corning Glass WorksTreating dimethyl silicone polymer with boric oxide
US2531763 *Aug 31, 1949Nov 28, 1950Jules E AndreSki boot
US2546827 *Oct 2, 1948Mar 27, 1951Lavinthal AlbertArch supporting device
US2571039 *Apr 12, 1950Oct 9, 1951 Title not available
US2641066 *Sep 5, 1950Jun 9, 1953Filardo LaurinMetatarsal length compensating device
US2760281 *Feb 17, 1954Aug 28, 1956Murray D CosinMoldable foot support
US2830585 *Apr 21, 1955Apr 15, 1958Efram I WeissAnkle support
US2854974 *Jul 2, 1953Oct 7, 1958Johnson & JohnsonPad
US2884646 *Dec 12, 1956May 5, 1959Alcosa EtsBladder structure
US2913837 *Apr 11, 1958Nov 24, 1959Holland Racine Shoes IncShoe heel construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3545105 *Jun 10, 1968Dec 8, 1970Michael Mayer RieckhSki boot
US4243754 *Sep 5, 1978Jan 6, 1981Hanson Industries IncorporatedViscous, flowable, pressure-compensating fitting compositions
US4252910 *Mar 7, 1978Feb 24, 1981Philipp SchaeferMaterial for resilient, conforming pads, cushions, supports or the like and method
US4952439 *Oct 14, 1988Aug 28, 1990Alden LaboratoriesPadding device
US5015313 *Nov 9, 1989May 14, 1991Alden Laboratories, Inc.Process for heat sealing packages
US5058291 *Aug 27, 1990Oct 22, 1991Alden Laboratories, Inc.Padding device
US5093138 *Aug 27, 1990Mar 3, 1992Alden Laboratories, Inc.Glycerin-containing flowable, pressure-compensating material and process for producing same
US5100712 *Sep 21, 1989Mar 31, 1992Alden Laboratories, Inc.Padding; water, viscosity-increasing material, spherical particles
US5131174 *Aug 27, 1990Jul 21, 1992Alden Laboratories, Inc.Self-reinitializing padding device
US5147685 *Feb 19, 1991Sep 15, 1992Alden Laboratories, Inc.Padding device
US5159717 *Jun 13, 1990Nov 3, 1992Alden Laboratories, Inc.Hand padding device
US5204154 *Mar 2, 1992Apr 20, 1993Alden Laboratories, Inc.Flowable, pressure-compensating material and process for producing same
US5362543 *Feb 23, 1993Nov 8, 1994Jay Medical, Ltd.Silicone fluid with an insoluble amide thickener and microballoons
US5407481 *Apr 20, 1993Apr 18, 1995Alden Laboratories, Inc.Flowable, pressure-compensating materials
US5507866 *Apr 18, 1995Apr 16, 1996Alden Laboratories, Inc.Flowable, pressure-compensating materials
US5513899 *Sep 29, 1993May 7, 1996Invacare CorporationSeat cushion for wheelchairs
US5593211 *Jan 6, 1995Jan 14, 1997Jay Medical Ltd.Deformity back system
US5720518 *Aug 30, 1996Feb 24, 1998Harrison; Craig R.Universal bike and exercycle seat cushion accessory
US5803416 *Aug 18, 1997Sep 8, 1998Alden Laboratories, Inc.Hand, wrist and/or lower arm support pad and assemblies
US5869164 *Nov 7, 1996Feb 9, 1999Rik Medical LlcComprises flexible envelop and deformable material inside the envelop which deforms in response to continuous applied pressure, a mixture of a polyalphaolefin oil and a thickener
US5916949 *Aug 18, 1997Jun 29, 1999Mattel, Inc.Moldable compositions and method of making the same
WO1991019431A1 *Jun 7, 1991Dec 26, 1991Alden Lab IncTongue padding device
Classifications
U.S. Classification12/142.00R, 36/154, 36/71, 128/DIG.210, 36/89, 36/117.6
International ClassificationA63B71/08, F41H1/04, A43B5/04, C08L23/22, C08K3/00, A63B59/00
Cooperative ClassificationC08L23/22, A63B71/081, A63B59/0014, Y10S128/21, A43B5/04, A43B5/0405, C08K3/0033, F41H1/04
European ClassificationC08K3/00P5, C08L23/22, A43B5/04, F41H1/04, A63B59/00B, A43B5/04B, A63B71/08A