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Publication numberUS3402877 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 24, 1968
Filing dateJun 16, 1967
Priority dateJun 16, 1967
Also published asDE1761491A1
Publication numberUS 3402877 A, US 3402877A, US-A-3402877, US3402877 A, US3402877A
InventorsPinkham Jesse R
Original AssigneeReynolds Tobacco Co R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package and blank for a package
US 3402877 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P 4, 1968 J. R. PINKHAM 3,402,877

PACKAGE AND BLANK FOR A PACKAGE F'iled June 16. 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 321 J & 3f

INVENTOR. JESSE 1?. I /NKHAM Med. M

ATI'dR/VEV Sept. 24, 1968 J. R. PINKHAM 3,402,877

PACKAGE AND BLANK FOR A PACKAGE Filed June 16, 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. L/ESSE RPM/(HAM .BYMUM P 4, 1968 J. R. PINKHAM 3,402,877

PACKAGE AND BLANK FOR A PACKAGE Filed June 16, 1967 1 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 I NVE N TOR. Jess: A? l /NK/MM Sept. 24, 1968 I J. R. PINKHAM 3,402,877

PACKAGE AND BLANK FOR A PACKAGE Filed June 16. 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 I NVENTOR. Jesse A? P/NK/MM Sept. 24, 1968 J. R. PINKHAM 3,402,877

PACKAGE AND BLANK FOR A PACKAGE Filed June 16, 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 I: '-IN i' INVENTOR. Tacl. E l JESSE A? I INKHAM United States Patent 3,402,877 PACKAGE AND BLANK FOR A PACKAGE Jesse R. Pinkham, Winston-Salem, N.C., assignor to R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Winston-Salem, N.C., a

Corporation of New Jersey Filed June 16, 1967, Ser. No. 646,577 20 Claims. (Cl. 22987) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A package and a blank for a package. The blank has a side edge including three successively connected segments, two of which are parallel and joined by the third segment. The edge segments define edges of panels in the package formed from the blank. The parallel edge segments permit wide and narrow flaps to be formed in the package, which together form a side of the package, with the wide flap overlying the narrow flap and extending over most of the side of the package. The blank is slit to rovide for a tuck and fold in the side of the package adjacent to an end of the package; the tuck is substantially fully covered by the wide flap.

Summary of the invention This invention relates to packages and to blanks for packages. The invention finds particular application in the providing of a package that is rectangular in section, typically a cigarette package. The invention is directed toward the wrapping of the package so that a panel of the wrapper extends as much as possible over a side of the package to provide a large display area for the inclusion of printed matter. In the present state of the art, the blank for a cigarette package is typically rectangular. With such a blank shape, the package is formed by tucking and folding the blank along the sides of the package to produce overlapping flaps of equal size, extending from front and rear package faces. Typically, one flap slightly overlaps the other flap; the overlapping flap usually covers little more than half of the area of the package side. At the tuck, a substantial part of the tuck is normally exposed.

In the present invention, a package blank is provided that is not rectangular. At least one of its side edges, and preferably both of its side edges, includes three segments, two of which are noncollinear (preferably parallel to each other), joined by a third segment transverse to the noncollinear edge segments. These edge segments define edges of panels in the package. The noncollinearity of the two side edge segments provides for the forming of narrow and wide flaps which are extensions of front and rear face panels in the package. The wide flap overlies the narrow flap and covers almost all of a side of the package. Additionally, the wide flap is slit to enable the tuck in the package side adjacent to an end of the package to be almost completely overlapped by the wide flap. In this fashion the wide flap covers almost the entire area of the side of the package.

The forming of the side edge or edges of the blank with noncollinear segments to provide wide and narrow package fiaps permits the almost complete cove-ring of one or more sides of the package by the wide flap(s) Without requiring additional blank material, as would be the case in the event that a conventional rectangular blank were employed with underlying and overlying flaps of equal size, each covering the full side of the package.

Brief description of the drawings FIG. 1 is a plan view of a series of blanks for packages in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of one of the blanks of FIG. 1 and a forming mandrel.

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FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the blank and mandrel of FIG. 2 and a strip of material employed in conjunctlon with the blank to form a package.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the blank, strip and mandrel of FIG. 3, showing one of the initial steps in forming a package.

FIG. 4A is a perspective view of the blank, strip and mandrel as in FIG. 4, with a side tuck taken in the package wrapper.

FIG. 4B is a perspective view showing the tuck in FIG. 4 following the completion of a side fold in the wrapper.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view showing the remaining side fold completed.

FIGS. 6, 7 and 8 are perspective views showing the completion of a package following the withdrawal of the forming mandrel initially employed in the formation of the package.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view showing the opening of the completed package shown in FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of another form of package blank in accordance with the invention.

FIGS. 11, 12 and 13 are perspective views showing the formation of a package from the blank of FIG. 10.

FIG. 14 is a plan view of another package blank in accordance with the invention.

FIGS. 15, 16 and 17 are perspective views showing the formation of a package from the blank of FIG. 14.

FIG. 18 is a plan view of a series of other package blanks in accordance with the invention.

FIGS. 19, 20 and 21 are perspective views showing the formation of a package from one of the blanks of FIG. 18.

FIG. 22 is a perspective view showing the opening of the completed package of FIG. 21.

Detailed description Referring to FIG. 1, a web 30 of a wrapping material is shown containing a series of blanks 32 therein. The wrapping material may be any suitable material such as a laminated wrapper of foil and paper, for example. The individual blanks 32 are cut from the web 30 to produce the blank shown in FIG. 2. The blank includes side edges 34 and 35 and end edges 38 and 40. The side edge 34 is formed from three successively connected segments, 34a, 34b and 340. The end segments 34a and 340 are noncollinear with respect to each other; in the embodiment shown they are parallel to each other. The intermediate edge segment 34b is transverse to the two segments 34a and 34c and connects adjacent ends of the segments.

Similarly, the side edge 36 of the blank is formed from three successively connected segments 36a, 36b and 360. The segments 36a and 360 are noncollinear and parallel with respect to each other and are connected at adjacent ends by the edge segment 36b. Opposite edge segments are parallel to each other; that is, segments 34a and 36a are parallel to each other, as are 34b and 36b, as well as 340 and 360.

The end edges 38 and 40 of the blank 32 in the embodiment shown are perpendicular to side edge segments 34a, 36a and 34c, 360. A slit 42 extends inwardly from the end edge 38 of the blank, and a slit 44 extends inwardly from the end edge 40. A slit 46 extends inwardly from the side edge segment 340 from a point adjacent to the intermediate edge segment 34b. Similarly, a slit 48 extends inwardly from the side edge segment 36a from a point adjacent to the intermediate edge segment 36b. In the embodiment shown, the slits 42 and 44 are collinear with respect to each other, whereas the slits 46 and 48 are noncollinear and parallel with respect to each other.

The blank 32 may be formed into a package of rectangula'r section. To this end a hollow forming mandrel 50 is positioned adjacent the middle portion of the blank 32. As shown in FIG. 3, a strip 52 of bendable material,

such as cardboard or heavy paper, is positioned between the blank 32 and the adjacent end of the mandrel 50. The width of the strip 52 is the same as the width of the completed package, and the strip is typically slightly longer than the girth of the package, i.e., the periphery of the package about the two ends and the two narrow sides. The strip 52 advantageously includes a pressure-thermal sealing coating, e.g., polyethylene or wax, on an outside surface 52a thereof, i.e., the surface of the strip adjacent to the blank 32.

Referring to FIG. 4, the mandrel Stl is shown moved into contact with the strip 52 so that the midportion of the strip bears against the midportion of the wrapper 32. At this time, the midportions of the strip and the wrapper may be adhesively secured to each other, e.g., by applying heat to these portions of the strip and the wrapper to activate the sealing coating on the surface 52a of the strip. The two ends of the wrapper 32 are bent or folded into contact with the mandrel as shown in FIG. 4. In particular, the end of the wrapper containing slit 42 is folded so as to lie against face 50a of the mandrel, while the end of the blank containing the slit 44 is folded so as to lie against mandrel face 50b.

Referring now to FIG. 4A, end 52b of the strip 52 is bent or folded against side 50c of the mandrel. A side tuck 54 is then taken in the wrapper. The side tuck is shown in somewhat more detail in FIG. 4B, which is a perspective view of the partially completed wrapper of FIG. 4A, looking upwardly from beneath the mandrel t} and after completion of a side fold 58. The tuck 54 is taken so that the midsection of the blank bounded by the edge segment 36b is positioned against the strip 52 that in turn bears against side 50c of the forming mandrel. This edge segment thus forms an edge of a panel in the completed package, i.e., an edge of tuck panel 54. A t

partial fold 56 is taken in the blank material bounded by the edge segment 36a, as permitted by the slit 48 in the wrapper, and another partial fold 57 (FIG. 4A) is taken in the blank material bounded by the edge segment 360. The partial fold 56 is taken about a line 56a joining the inside end of slit 48 with adjacent corner 66a of the package. Following these partial folds, a first complete side fold 58 is taken in the wrapper against the forming mandrel and overlying part of the tuck 54. This side fold is formed from that part of the wrapper blank adjacent to the edge segment 360. This edge segment thus forms an edge of a side panel in the completed package, i.e., an edge of said panel 58. Following this fold, an overlying side fold 60 (FIG. 5) is taken which overlies the side fold 58 as well as the tuck 54. This side fold is completed is completed for both sides of the package, as shown in FIG. 5.

It should be noted that the side fold 60 constitutes a wide flap that is an extension of the blank material that forms front face panel 62 of the package. Similarly, the side fold 58 constitutes a narrow flap that is an extension of the blank material that forms rear face panel 64 (FIG. 4B) of the wrapper. The narrow fiap 58 covers substantially less than one-half the side of the package, while the wide fiap 60 covers almost the entire side of the package and covers almost all of tuck 54. For the purpose of illustration, the slit 48 (FIG. 4A) has been shown positioned an appreciable distance away from end 66 of the package. In practice, it is desirable to position the slit 48 as close to the end of the package as possible, so that the side flap 60 covers as much of the package side as possible and so that little, if any, of the tuck 54 is exposed.

Those portions of the side tuck 54 and folds 58 and 6% bearing against the outside surface 52a of the strip 52 are adhesively secured thereto, typically by the application Cir 4 of heat. The portions of the wrapper overlapping each other, e.g., the portion of the side fold 60 overlapping the side fold 58, may be secured to each other by a suitable adhesive material applied to these portions of the wrapper.

The partially completed package and mandrel as shown in FIG. 5 are ready for the application of a product thereto. Although in the following description cigarettes are described as the packaged product, the product is only representative. Typically, cigarettes are applied through the hollow mandrel by any suitable means. Thereafter, the mandrel and package are disengaged from each other. For example, a ram (not shown) may be employed to push the cigarettes entirely through the mandrel, so that the lower ends of the cigarettes bear against the closed end 66 of the package. The ram continues to push the cigarettes against the closed end of the package, so as to cause the package containing the cigarettes therein to be ejected from the mandrel. Such a partially completed package ejected from the mandrel and containing cigarettes therein is shown in FIG. 6. The package is ready to be completed, as shown in FIGS. 7 and 8.

In FIG. 7, a first end tuck 70 and end folds 72 and 74 are taken in the wrapper. The end folds 72 and 74 may be completed by virtue of the slits 42 and 44 in the wrapper (FIG. 6). Referring to FIG. 8, a final end tuck 76 and final end folds 78 and 80 are taken in the wrapper, completing the package.

It will be noted from FIG. 8 that typically a small portion of end 52c of the strip 52 extends from inside the wrapper to a position outside the wrapper through the wrapper slits 42 and 44. The end tucks and folds are typically adhesively secured to the strip 52 and to each other by the application of heat and pressure. The strip end 520 constitutes an accessible pull for the purpose of opening the package. The end 52c is pulled away from the end of the package as shown in FIG. 9 to tear the wrapper to render accessible the cigarettes therein. An adhesive may be employed on the outside surface of the fold 74, for example, to adhesively secure the torn wrapper in a closed position, if desired, in order to reclose the package.

The wide flap 60, shown in FIG. 9, which extends over almost the entire side of the package, provides a large area surface for the addition of printed material. By making slit 48 close to the end of the package, little of the tuck will show and more flap material will be available for printing. If a conventional rectangular blank were employed instead of the blank having the shape shown in FIG. 2, more blank material would have to be utilized to create a wide overlying side flap, since in conventional packages the overlying and underlying side flaps are of equal width. It is an unnecessary use of blank material to employ a wide underlying flap, since that flap is covered by the overlying flap. The use of wide and narrow side flaps as in the present invention is believed to provide approximately 7 /2% saving of blank material. The slit 48, which permits the flap 60 to cover the tuck 54, does not extend fully to edge 76 of the package. By the folding and sealing procedure that is followed (utilizing the partial told 56 of FIG. 4A), the package may be completely sealed and the slit does not provide an opening by which air may enter the package.

Thus a unique package corner is formed in the wrapper. The face panel 62 and the side 60 and end 66 of the package are all substantially at right angles to each other. The tuck 54 is taken about the edge of the package joining the side 60 and end 66. The partial fold 56 taken about the line 56a (from the inside end of slit 48 to the intersection of the face 62 and side 60 and end 66) overlies the tuck, and the fold creating the flap 60 (about the edge of the package joining face 62 and side 60) overlies the partial fold and tuck. This corner structure provides an effective seal while permitting maximum display area in the flap 60.

FIG. 10 shows a modified package blank in accordaaoas'w spondingto slits 46 and 48 in FIGJI.

The bla'nkiir jFIG.'10 is adapted to be formedinto a pack-agefas shown in' FIGS. to '13. Side face'90 is formed in thesame fashion" as the "'side"'face" 60-of"the package previously described in FIGS. 1 to 9. The end closure, however, is'formed differently. Tucks 92 and 94 are first taken, as shown in FIG. 12, against the cigarettes in the package. Next, a fold 96 is completed downwardly against the ends of the cigarettes and overlying the tucks '92 and 94. Finally, the flap 78a is folded downwardly against the ends of the cigarettes overlying the tucks 92 and 94 and fold 96 at this'end of the package, so as to complete the package, as shown in FIG. 13. The flap 78a covers almost the entire end of the package and provides a closure which con'stitutes a large area surface for containing printed matter. Additionally, the side face 90'eonstitutes a wide flap, as described above.

' In the embodiment of FIGS. -13, no strip of bendable material, such as strip 52in FIG. 3, is employed. Typically, the Wrapping material is of suflicient rigidity to retain the package shape as the cigarettes are withdrawn from the package. The tucks and folds in the package wrapper are adhesively secured to each other in forming the finished package. The flap 78a is slightly smaller than the end of the package to ensure that edges of the flap do not extend past edges of the package. The blank is cut slightly irrline'with the edges of the flap (cuts 98a -and98b in FIG. 10) to ensure the covering of folded parts 92a and 94a (FIG.12) 'by the flap.

FIG. 14 shows another embodiment of the invention, employing still another form of blank shape. The blank of FIG. 14 is similar to one of the blanks 32 of FIG. 1, except that it is intended for a long 'side-to-long side wrap of apackage, whereas the blank of FIG. 1 is intended as ashor't side-to-short side wrap. In this regard, a package is considered to have four sides, -i:e-., 'two long sides and two short sides. The short sides are conventionally termed ends of the package. The blanks of FIGS. 1 and 14 are similar to the 'extentthat eachincludes 'a side edge having three successively connected segments, two of which are noncollinear 'and'parallel, joined by a third, transverse segment; In' FIG.14, side edge 100" includes three such segments 100a, 10012 and 10%; In addition, two other successively connected segments 100a and 100a are included. The segment 1002 is collinear with the segment 100a, and the segment 100d joins together the adjacent ends of the edge segments 100a and 1002. In similar fashion, the other side edge 102 of the blank includes three successively connected segments 102a, 1022; and 102e, as well as two additional seginents 102d and 102e. End edges 104.and .1065-of; theublank are perpendicular to the side edge segments which they intersect. Slits 108a and 108k extend inwardly from the side edge segment 100c, while slits 110a and 1110b exteridinwardly from the side edge segment 102a. Theslits1 08a and 110a are collinear with respect to each othenas are the slits 10812 and 11011.

The blank of FIG. 14 is formed into a package, as shown in FIG. 15. The wrapping procedure is long sideto-long side rather than short side-to-short side (end-toend) as in FIGS. 2-9. The end of the blank adjacent to the end 106 overlaps the end of the blank adjacent to the edge 104, as shown in FIGS. 15 and 16. These overlapping portions of the blank may be adhesively secured to each other in any suitable fashion. The ends of the package (short sides) are completed by employing a tuck and fold procedure similar to that employed in the long sides of the package shown in FIGS. 5-9. In particular, the sides of the package wrapper adjacent to the slits a and 11% are tucked inwardly against the ends of the cigarettes, as shown in FIG. 16, to form tucks and 122. These tucks constitute panels of the finished package (tuck panels) bounded by edge segments 10212 and 102d.

\ Next, the portion of the blank adjacent to the edge 102a is folded downwardly, as shown in FIG. '16, to form a narrow flap 126 which constitutes an extension of front face panel 124 of the package. Finally, the portion 128 of the'blank adjacent to the edge 102c and constituting a wide flap extension of the other face panel of the package is folded against the ends of the cigarettes to overlie the tucks 120 and 122 and the narrow flap 126. The tucks and flaps are adhesively secured to each other.

The finished package is shown in FIG. 17, and it will be noted that the wide flap 128 covers almost all of the end face of the package. The other end of the package is similarly closed. The wide flap 128 constitutes a large area surface suitable for containing printed matter. By making the slits 110a and 110b, shown in FIG. 15, closer to the long sides of the package, very little of the tucks 120 and 122 will be exposed, and the area of the wide flap 128 will be increased. The slits 110a and 11% may be located as close to the long sides of the package as desired.

FIG. 18 shows a web 130 of material, including individual blanks 132 similar to the blanks 32 of FIG. 1. Each blank 132 is the same as blank 32, with the exception of a tab 134 formed in one end thereof. The tab 134 is employed as an opening device similar to the end 520 of the strip 52 shown in FIGS. 8 and 9. The formation of a package from one of the blanks of FIG. 18 is shown in FIGS. 1921. It will be noted that the package does not include a strip 52 as does the package of FIGS. 5-9. The completion of the wrapper in FIG. 19 about the cigarettes, specifically, the completion of side tuck 136 and side folds 138 and 140 on each side of the package, is the same as the side tuck and side fold completion shown in FIGS. 5-9. The end of the package is closed in much the same fashion. In particular, a first end tuck 142 is completed, followed by end folds 144 and 146, to close off one-half of the open end of the package. Next, a corresponding end tuck is taken in the wrapper at the tab 134, forming end tuck 134', shown in FIG. 21. Following this, end folds 148 and 150 are completed over the end tuck to complete the package, as shown in FIG. 21. It will be noted that the tab 134 extends outside the wrapper through slits 152 and 154 in the wrapper. Thus, in order to open the package, the tab 134 is pulled away from the end of the package, thereby tearing the wrapper, as shown in FIG. 22. An adhesive may be employed on the outside surface of the fold 146, for example, to adhesively secure the torn flap 156 in a closed position against the ends of the cigarettes, if desired, in order to recl-ose the package following the initial tearing of the wrapper.

A number of embodiments of the invention have been disclosed. It is apparent that the embodiments are susceptible of modification. Hence, the invention should not be taken to be limited specifically to the embodiments shown, but should be taken to be defined by the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a blank for a package having a first side edge comprising first, second and third successively connected segments, the first and third segments being noncollinear with respect to each other, the second segment joining together adjacent ends of the first and third segments, the improvement comprising a slit in the blank extending inwardly from said third segment from a point adjacent to said second segment to aid in the formation of a tuck and fold at a corner in the package formed from the blank.

2. A blank for a package having a first side edge comprising first, second and third successively connected segments, the first and third segments being noncollinear with respect to each other, the second segment joining together adjacent ends of the first and third segments, wherein the blank has a second side edge comprising three successively connected segments that are opposite to and parallel to the three successively connected segments of the first side edge.

3. A blank for a package as defined in claim 2, wherein said blank has first and second end edges at the ends of the blank joining together the first and second side edges.

4. A blank for a package as defined in claim 3 wherein said first and second end edges are substantially perpendicular to said first and second side edges.

5. A blank for a package as defined in claim 4, including a slit in each end of the blank extending inwardly from the end edge of the blank.

6. A blank for a package as defined in claim 5, wherein the slits formed in the ends of the blank are collinear with respect to each other.

7. A blank for a package as defined in claim 6, including a slit in the blank extending inwardly from said second side edge toward said first side edge.

8. A blank for a package as defined in claim 2, wherein one of the ends of the blank includes a tab extending away from the main body of the blank.

9. A blank for a package having a first side edge comprising first, second and third successively connected segments, the first and third segments being noncollinear with respect to each other, the second segment joining together adjacent ends of the first and third segments, wherein the first side edge of the blank includes fourth and fifth segments successively connected to the third segment, the first and fifth segments being collinear with respect to each other and the fourth segment joining together the third and fifth segments.

10. A blank for a package as defined in claim 9, in-

cluding two slits in the blank extending inwardly from said third segment from points adjacent to said second and fourth segments.

11. A blank for a package as defined in claim 9, wherein the blank has a second side edge comprising five successively connected segments that are opposite to the five successively connected segments of the first side edge, all of the opposed edge segments of the blank being parallel with respect to each other except the fourth segments in the side edges.

12. A blank for a package as defined in claim 11, including two slits in the blank extending inwardly from said third segment of said first side edge from points adjacent to said second and fourth segments, and two other slits extending inwardly from said second side edge that are collinear with respect to the two slits from the first side edge.

13. A package formed from the blank of claim 2 and having two opposing faces and a side joining the opposed faces, comprising a wrapper covering a first face of the package and having a wide fiap extending from the first face along the side of the package so as to cover substantially more than half of the package side, the second face having a narrow fiap extending from the second face along said side and being overlapped, at least in part, by said wide flap and covering substantially less than half of said package side.

14. A package having two opposing faces and a side joining the opposed faces, comprising a wrapper covering a first face of the package and having a wide fiap extending from the first face along the side of the package so as to cover substantially more than half of the package side, the second face having a narrow flap extending from the second face along said side and being overlapped, at least in part, by said wide flap and covering substantially less than half of said package side, wherein said wide flap is slit inwardly from the outer edge thereof adjacent an end of the package, said slit extending inwardly toward but not to the edge of the package joining the side and first face, permitting a tuck and fold to be formed adjacent the end of the package sealing the package while providing a substantially full covering of the side of the package by the wide flap as well as a substantially full covering of the tuck so formed.

15. A package as defined in claim 14, wherein said tuck is taken against said side of said package and adjoins a partial fold formed from a part of said wide flap, said partial fold underlying said wide flap and overlying said tuck, said partial fold being about a line from the inner'end of said slit and to an adjacent corner of the package.

16. A package for cigarettes as defined in claim 15, wherein said package is rectangular in section and includes two sides covered by wide and narrow flaps.

17. A package as defined in claim 16, wherein one of said sides of said package constitutes the portion of the package which may be opened to gain access to the cigarettes within the package.

18. A package having two opposing faces and a side joining the opposed faces, comprising a wrapper covering a first face of the package and having a wide flap extending from the first face along the side of the package so as to cover substantially more than half of the package side, the second face having a narrow fiap extending from the second face along said side and being overlapped, at least inpart, by said wide flap and covering substantially less than half of said package side, wherein an end of said package is covered by a second wide flap constituting an extension of one of the faces of the wrapper, said second wide flap covering substantially the entire surface of said package end.

19.A corner section of a package, said package having two intersecting sides substantially at right angles to each other and an intersecting face substantially perpendicular to the sides, comprising a wrapper extending from the face along one of the sides, a tuck in said wrapper taken against the other side of the package about the edge of the package joining said sides, said wrapper being slit inwardly from an outer edge thereof adjacent to said edge joining said sides, said slit extending inwardly toward but not to the edge of the package joining said face and said other side, and a partial fold formed from a part of said wrapper, said partial fold being about a line from the inner end of said slit to the corner of the package defined by the intersection of said sides and face.

20. A corner section of a package as defined in claim 19, wherein said wrapper is folded about the edge of the package joining said face and said other side, said fold being against said other package side and overlying said partial fold which in turn overlies said tuck.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,295,461 2/1919 De Escobales 22987 1,478,838 12/1923 Reifsnyder 229-61 X 1,785,639 12/1930 Maurer 22951 1,821,246 9/1931 Taylor 229--61 2,866,304 12/1958 Korber 5314 DAVID M. BOCKENEK, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1295461 *May 16, 1917Feb 25, 1919Hilarion De EscobalesTobacco-products package.
US1478838 *Jul 14, 1921Dec 25, 1923Paper Utilities Co IncCollapsible cup
US1785639 *Jun 18, 1929Dec 16, 1930Maurer Otto TPackage-opening device
US1821246 *Jun 17, 1927Sep 1, 1931Taylor William LMultiplex bag
US2866304 *Sep 26, 1955Dec 30, 1958Kurt Korber & Co K GMethod of producing a soft package for cigarettes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4015770 *Jul 24, 1975Apr 5, 1977Tamarin Bernard JPackaging
US4121713 *Nov 4, 1976Oct 24, 1978Focke & PfuhlPack made from laminated sheeting
US4351433 *Dec 26, 1979Sep 28, 1982Molins PlcCigarette packets
US8136661Jun 18, 2008Mar 20, 2012Philips Morris Usa Inc.Wrapped bundle of smoking articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/87.13, 206/264, 206/273, 206/268
International ClassificationB65D65/02, B65D85/10, B65D65/06, B65D85/08
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2301/10, B65D65/06, B65D85/1027
European ClassificationB65D85/10F2, B65D65/06