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Publication numberUS3405712 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 15, 1968
Filing dateFeb 7, 1966
Priority dateFeb 7, 1966
Publication numberUS 3405712 A, US 3405712A, US-A-3405712, US3405712 A, US3405712A
InventorsPierick Richard L
Original AssigneeRichard L. Pierick
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Desiccative syringe
US 3405712 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

` Oct. l5, 1968 R. 1 PIERICK 3,405,712

DES ICCATIVE SYRINGE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb.

Oct. 15, 1968 R. l.. PIERICK DESICCATIVE SYRINGE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. '7, 1966 /m/E/vro 8 Qc/Meo Pfff/6K United States Patent O 3,405,712 DESICCATIVE SYRINGE Richard L. Pierick, 2800 Tiffin, Des Moines, Iowa 50317 Filed Feb. 7, 1966, Ser. No. 525,479 3 Claims. (Cl. 12S-218) ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE The invention is embodied in a single device usable both as a desiccator for a powdered medicament, and as a transporter of the powdered medicament under vacuum in conjunction with a liquid medicament physically separated therefrom, until at the point of use the device is operable to mix the medicaments prior to ejection therefrom by means of a hypodermic needle affixed thereto. The arrangement includes forming one end of the powdered medicament-holding casing with at least one flute formed on its interior, which flute enables an evacuation of moisture from the powdered medicament held within the interior of the casing, past a portion of a tube inserted into the casing prior to the desiccation process, which tube holds the liquid medicament. At the end of the desiccation process, the tube is forced past the flute and further into the casing such that the relative positions of the tube and the casing effect a sealing relationship between the powdered medicament, now under a vacuum, and the liquid medicament. At the point of use, due t0 the provision of a cannula tube held within the casing, and which tube has a trio of longitudinally spaced portions formed therein, one of which is at the pointed end of the tube, and the other two of which are not in fluid communication within the tube, coaction between the tube and the casing effects first a mixing of the medicaments together, and secondly an ejection therefrom, said ejection being transmitted by a hypodermic-type needle which has been aflixed to the casing.

This invention relates to a syringe, and more particularly to a syringe which is suitable to be placed in a desiccator, wherein the diluent is initially sealed in one element of the syringe and the pharmaceutical, or biological, to be desiccated is initially contained in another separate element of the syringe. The elements of the syringe are manipulatable to accomplish admixture of the diluent and the pharmaceutical, and then are operable as a piston and cylinder means to eject the resulting mixture in the hypodermic administration thereof.

The general known practice is to place the diluent in one sealed bottle and the desiccated pharmaceutical in a second bottle for shipment to the place of use. The diluent is then removed from the bottle by a syringe wherein a hypodermic needle attached thereto is forced through the seal and the diluent is drawn into the syringe. The seal of the pharmaceutical bottle is then punctured by the hypodermic needle and the diluent is then ejected therein. The diluent and desiccated pharmaceutical are thoroughly mixed and again the hypodermic needle is forced into the bottle to withdraw the mixture prior to injection into the patient.

It is well known that it is extremely diiiicult if not impossible to meet the sanitary requirements necessary in the hypodermic administration of a desiccated pharmaceutical when the diluent is added at the time of use and then the mixture must be placed in a syringe for administration thereof.

An object of this invention is to provide a multi-compartrnent syringe, wherein each compartment contains one component of a charge, which can be placed in a desic- JCC cator for desiccation of one of the components, shipped, and then used as a syringe without structural change.`

Another object of the invention is the provision of a syringe of a two part, two compartment, telescopically arranged structure7 wherein absolutely perfect sanitation is provided, no contamination of one component of a charge with another component being possible.

A further object of this invention is to provide a multicompartment syringe, wherein the desiccated product occupies one compartment and the diluent occupies another, and both compartments can be shipped together as a unit.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide a syringe carrying two components of a charge in separated compartments, which is constructed for placement in a conventional desiccator chamber, and manipulatable to effeet a mixing immediately prior to use of the components.

A still further object of this invention is the provision of a syringe employing only a casing for containing one component of a charge to be ejected by a syringe, and a plunger slidable into the easing, and with the plunger containing another component of a charge, and wherein the casing and the plunger are operable in one position to effect a condition suitable for the desiccation of the first component with the second component in a sealed condition, operable in a second position to effect a transportation eondition with both components sealed oli, operable in a third position to provide a mixing condition where the components are mixed together within the casing, and operable in a fourth position wherein the casing assumes the function of a cylinder and lthe plunger assumes the function of a piston to eject the mixed charge from the casing.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a syringe particularly constructed for use in a desiccator wherein the shelves of the latter are moved relative to each other, the syringe operable to permit desiccation of a pharmaceutical carried therein, and responsive to the operation of the desiccator to seal the desiccated pharmaceutical for future ejection by the syringe itself without other attachments, except for a conventional hypoderrnic needle.

It is another object of this invention to provide a syringe capable of attaining the above designated objectives, which is economical to manufacture, simple and rugged in construction, and effective in use.

These objects and other features and advantages of this invention will be readily apparent according to the following description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. l is an exploded, sectional view of the elements of the syringe of this invention taken along the longitudinal axis of the syringe;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, sectional view of the syringe, showing the parts thereof in a desiccation position, with a pair of components to make up an injection charge shown in separated compartments;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 3 3 in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a greatly enlarged, fragmentary sectional view of the tube taken along the longitudinal axis thereof;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged, fragmentary sectional view similar to FIG. 2, wherein the plunger part of the syringe is shown in a transportation position;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged, fragmentary sectional view similar to FIG. 2, and showing the parts in a third position permitting thereby the components to be mixed;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged, lfragmentary sectional view similar to FIG. 6, wherein the plunger part of the syringe is shown in a fourth position wherein the components are mixed and sealed in the casing;

FIG. 8 is a greatly enlarged, fragmentary sectional 3 view, wherein the syringe has been rotated to a position immediately prior to use with a hypodermic needle unit attached to the exposed end of the casing; and

FIG. 9 is a plan view of the syringe with a hypodermic needle attached.

Referring now to the drawings, a preferred embodiment of the syringe of this invention is indicated generally at 10 in FIGS. l and 2. The syringe comprises basically a casing 11 having an open top end 12, and a nozzletype bottom end 13 normally closed by a cap 14. A tubular plunger 16 is provided for axial, reciprocable inser tion into the casing 11, having a closed upper end 17 and an open lower end 18 normally sealed by a knob 19. A tube 21 is mounted in the casing 11 on the longitudinal axis thereof.

More specifically, the casing 11 comprises an elongated cylindrical body 22, the inner Wall surface 23 of which has a substantially constant diameter, forming a substantially cylindrical interior 24, adapted to contain one component 25 (FIG. 2) of a charge to lbe ejected by the syringe 10. A passage 26 is axially formed through the bottom end 13. An annular end llange 27 is provided at the top end of the casing body 22. A plurality of arcuately and equally spaced, longitudinally extended flutes 28 are formed in the casing 'body 22, as best shown in FIGS. l and 3, which are open to the interior 24.

A first annular flange 29 (FIG. 1), extending into the interior 24, is formed on the interior wall 23 intermediate the top and fbottom ends 12 and 13, respectively, of the casing 11. A second annular llange 31 (FIG. l), extending into the interior 24, is Iformed on the interior 4wall 23 parallel to and spaced a certain distance from the irst flange 29 toward the bottom end 13. The diameters of the flanges 29 and 31 are substantially identical, and are less than the diameter of the body 22. It will also 'be noted that the utes 28 extend from the inner edge of the flange 27 toward but ending intermediate the edge and the closest ange 29.

The tube 21 (FIG. l), having an outer end 32 mounted in the opening 26, is hollow, with the inner pointed end 33 located longitudinally intermediate the first and second flanges 29 and 31. Two longitudinally spaced cut-outs 34 and 36 (FIG. 4) are formed in the tube 21, and iluidly communicate thhe interior of the tube 21 with the casing interior 24. The llrst cut-out 34 is disposed immediately below the second flange 31, as best shown in FIG. 2, and the second cut-out 36 is disposed near the bottom end 13. The interior of the tube 21 is closed by a plu-g 37 (FIG. 4) or by crimping intermediate the cut-outs 34 and 36. The outer end 32 extends through the ybottom end 13 and fluidity communicates the interior 24 with the atmosphere.

More particularly as to the plunger 16 (FIG. l) it comprises also a cylindrical body 38, the outer diameter of which is substantially constant and which is less than the inner diameter of the casing wall 22 and the inner diameter of the flanges 29 and 31. The cavity 41 formed within the body 38 is adapted to contain a second component of the charge 42 to be ejected by the syringe 10. In certain instances the upper end 17 should be flat to facilitate the manipulation of the plunger 16.

The knob 19 (FIG. 1), of a deformable material, has an annular flange 43 formed thereon which has an outer diameter substantially equal to the inner diameter of the body 38, thus providing an effective seal when the knob 19 is inserted into the body 38. A flange 44 is integrally formed on the knob 19, as best shown in FIG. 1, having an outer diameter substantially equal to the inner diameter of the casing wall 22. This provides that the plunger 16 slides tightly into the casing 11, with the flange 44 effecting a seal with the interior surface 23 at any time it engages the wall 22, except as seen hereinafter.

In operation, the second component 42 of the charge, generally a diluent such as distilled water, is placed in the plunger 16 and the knob 19 is inserted therein, thus sealing the diluent in the plunger 16. The first component 25 of the charge, a pharmaceutical, is placed in the casing 11 `with the cap 14 closing the bottom end thereof, and the plunger is inserted, 'with the flange 44 of the knob 19 disposed intermediate the longitudinal axis of the flutes 28, as best shown in FIG. 2.

In the condition of FIG. 2, the syringe 10 is then placed in a desiccator in a vertical position with the cap 14 at the bottom, and the pharmaceutical is desiccated. The moisture extracted from the pharmaceutical `will be drawn off and out of the casing interior 24 through the ilutes 28, as shown by the arrows in FIG. 2.

Upon completion of the desiccation cycle, the plunger 16 is pressed down by the desiccator shelf or other struc ture until the tlange 44 seats against the first flange 29, as best shown in FIG. 5. The syringe 10 (FIG. 5) is thereby automatically, in response to operation of the sandwich, shelf-type desiccator, placed in its transportation position. The two components 25 and 42 are separated, one in the casing 11 and the other in the plunger 16, by the sealed nature of the flanges 43 and 44. The frictional engagement of the flange 44 with the casing wall 22 is sufficiently tight such that ordinary transportation jarring of the syringe 10 in the FIG; 5 condition would not cause relative movement of the casing 11 and the plunger 16. Further, the shipping container itself could be molded to fit the parts of the syringe in their FIG. 5 position to aid in preventing the relative movement.

At the point of use, the syringe 10 is grasped in the normal manner with the ngers below the flange 27 of the casing 11, and with the thumb against the upper end 17 of the plunger. The plunger 16 is moved into the casing 11, effecting actually a relative movement of both parts, It may be necessary to supply a slight twisting motion of the plunger 16 to enable the flange 44 of the knob 19 to pass the first flange 29 of the casing 11.

Axial movement of the plunger 16 relative to the casing 11 is continued until the llange 44 seats against the second flange 31 of the casing 11, as best shown in FIG. 5, whereby the pointed end 33 of the tube 21 pierces the center of the knob 19 and the flange 44 is disposed intermediate the tubes pointed end 33 and the first cut-out 34. The diluent 42 is then immediately sucked into the casing interior 24 by the vacuum in the interior 24 created by the desiccation process, whereupon it mixes with the pharmaceutical .25. This llow is indicated by the arrows in FIG. 6, wherein the diluent flows from the cavity 41 outwardly through the tube 21 from the pointed end 33 and out through the rst cut-out 34 into the casing interior 24. At the same time that the diluent flows into the casing interior 24, the air in the plunger cavity 41 is also sucked into the casing interior 24 so as to equalize the air pressure within the two cavities.

Continued axial movement of the plunger 16 relative to the casing 11, with possibly a slight twisting, if necessary, brings the parts to another relative position best illustrated in FIG. 7. The flange 44 has passed the second ilange 31 of the casing and is positioned intermediate the first cutout 34 and the second cut-out 36 of the tube 21. The resulting mixture is then shaken to make certain that all of the pharmaceutical 25 is dissolved. It should be noted that one using the syringe may easily see these various elements. The air entrapped with the casing 24 will flow out through the first cut-out 34 and into the plunger cavity 41 until the flange 44 passes downwardly past the cut-out 34, thus easing the axial movement of the plunger 16 into the casing 11. With the llange 44 disposed between the mixture and the cut-out 34, and due to the crimp 37, the two components 25 and 42 are now prevented from leaking or being forced from the casing interior 24 to the plunger cavity 41 via the tube 21.

The syringe 10 is then turned upside down, or turned to a position from that of FIGS. 1-7, whereby the charge rests against the knob 19 (FIG. 8) by gravity. In this position of the syringe 10, the cap 14 can be removed and a hypodermic needle unit 46 substituted therefor.

The syringe is now ready for use. The plunger 16 is then inserted further into the casing 11 to elect an egress of the charge contained therein through the needle unit 46.

Although a preferred embodiment of this invention has been described and disclosed hereinbefore, it is to be remembered that various modifications and alternate constructions can be made thereto without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A desiccative syringe comprising in combination:

a casing open at one end and having a cylindrical interior with a constant inner diameter except for having a pair of longitudinally spaced annular flanges formed therein the inner diameters of which are less than said interior diameter, said casing having a plurality of arcuately spaced utes formed on the interior surface thereof and extending from the edge of said end toward the closest of said flanges;

a tube mounted axially in said casing at an end opposite said one end to communicate said casing interior with the atmosphere, said tube having an inner pointed open end located intermediate said liange closest to said opposite end and having a pair of longitudinally spaced ports formed threin intermediate said open end and said casing opposite end, each port communicating the interior of the tube with said casing interior, and said tube interior closed intermediate said ports;

a hollow plunger closed at one end, open at the other end, and having an outer diameter less than the inner diameter of said casing interior; and

a resilient knob closing said other plunger end and having an annular flange of substantially the same outer diameter as said casing interior inner diameter, said knob insertable into said casing open end in a sealing manner and adapted to be pierced by said tube pointed end, receiving said tube in a sealing manner;

said ange having a thickness less than the axial distance from said tube pointed open end to the port closest thereto, less than the axial distance betwen said ports, less than the axial distance between said tube pointed open end and the liange closest thereto, and less than the axial length of said flutes.

2. A desiccative syringe comprising in combination:

a tubular casing closed at one end and open at the other end and having a substantially constant inner diameter, said casing having at least one ute formed on the interior surface thereof, said ute extended from said open end inwardly thereof; a cannula tube mounted axially in said casing at said 5 closed end and communicating said casing interior with the atmosphere, said tube having a pointed open end, and having a pair of longitudinally spaced ports formed therein between said open end and said casing closed end within said casing interior, said tube 10 interior closed intermediate said ports;

cap means detachably secured to said casing closed end for closing ofrr said tube from the atmosphere; and

a hollow plunger having one end the circumference of which is slightly smaller than said casing inner diameter, said one end frictionally inserted into said casing open end, said plunger one end having a portion thereof of a material pierceable by said tube pointed open end, and the thickness of said portion being less than the axial distance from said tube pointed open end to the port closest thereto, less than the axial distance between said ports, and less than the axial distance of said ute;

said plunger adapted to have a liquid medicament therein, and said casing adapted to have a powdered medicament therein under a vacuum when said tube one end portion is inserted into said casing between said flute and said casing closed end.

3. A desiccative syringe as defined in claim 2, and further wherein said cap means includes a cap engageable with a substantially flat surface for supporting the remainder of the desiccative syringe in an upright position for desiccation purposes.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS FOREIGN PATENTS 45 934,524 8/ 1963 Great Britain.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner.

M. F. MAJESTIC, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2193322 *Apr 30, 1938Mar 12, 1940Cook Lab IncControllable transfer element for multiple compartment ampules
US2649090 *Sep 29, 1950Aug 18, 1953American Cyanamid CoRubber closure for pharmaceutical vials
US2653607 *Sep 28, 1950Sep 29, 1953Ayerst Mckenna & HarrisonInjection apparatus
US3108591 *May 29, 1962Oct 29, 1963Bristol Mycrs CompanySyringe
US3330280 *Aug 25, 1964Jul 11, 1967Duo Matic CorpCombination syringe vial and plunger and syringe
GB934524A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3810469 *May 24, 1972May 14, 1974Ampoules IncMultiple compartment hypodermic devices
US4084588 *Mar 19, 1976Apr 18, 1978Sherwood Medical Industries Inc.Parenteral drug storage device with closure piercing coupling member
US4198974 *Nov 9, 1978Apr 22, 1980Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Combination stopper for use in medical and chemical sampling or testing
US5380281 *Apr 6, 1992Jan 10, 1995Bracco, S.P.A.Device for the administration of drugs, particularly two-component drugs
US20120016296 *Aug 5, 2009Jan 19, 2012The Medical House LimitedAutoinjector with mixing means
WO2013098805A1 *Dec 20, 2012Jul 4, 2013Omrix Biopharmaceuticals Ltd.Method and device for fast dissolution of solid protein composition
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/88
International ClassificationA61M5/31, A61M5/32, A61M5/28
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/32, A61M5/284, A61M5/3291, A61M2005/3123
European ClassificationA61M5/28M