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Publication numberUS3405771 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 15, 1968
Filing dateApr 12, 1966
Priority dateApr 12, 1966
Publication numberUS 3405771 A, US 3405771A, US-A-3405771, US3405771 A, US3405771A
InventorsCarr Charles J, Dudley Hughes Marion
Original AssigneeMr Dudley Hughes
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Deep well motor impact tool and drilling apparatus
US 3405771 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 15, 1968 c. J. CARR ETAL DEEP WELL MOTOR IMPACT TOOL AND DRILLING APPARATUS 7 w a 2 D, 0 M a. 4%4 7 rmw 224%. A 2,1 7 e l /27 Wm M A NQ AVVZ 1. a F m mum m u J I a 2 w i 4 1 I ZWGN/ 1 MD A i g I 17/4 M D a F a m M/ H wfwmw vfi w 0 C a p 1 United States Patent 3,405,771 DEEP WELL MOTOR IMPACT TOOL AND DRILLING APPARATUS Charles J. Can, Anaheim, and Marion Dudley Hughes, Long Beach, Calif. (both Mr. Dudley Hughes, 1111 Security Bldg, Long Beach, Calif. 90362) Filed Apr. 12, 1966, Ser. No. 542,159 11 Claims. (Cl. 175-73) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A combination rotor and percussion deep well drilling tool including, an elongate vertical barrel with fluid conducting means at its upper end to connect with a drill collar at the lower end of a drillin string, an elongate, tubular, fluid conducting column slidably engaged in the barrel and having a lower end depending therefrom, said column having means at its lower end to connect with a rotary bit, an elongate longitudinally extending radially outwardly opening helical groove, and sealing means at its upper end to seal between the column and the barrel, and drive means between the column and the barrel, and drive means between the barrel and the column to rotate the column relative to the barrel upon downward shifting of the barrel relative to the column and including a drive sleeve adjacent the lower end of the barrel surrounding the column, a cam lug on the sleeve and engaged in the groove, and releasable clutch means between the barrel and the sleeve to establish driving engagement between the sleeve and the barrel upon downward shifting of the barrel relative to the column.

This invention has to do with an oil well tool and related apparatus and is more particularly concerned with a novel tool and apparatus adapted for use in directional well bore drilling operations. The art of drilling oil wells is old and highly developed. The art of directional drilling that is, the art of varying the direction in which a well bore is established, in a predetermined direction, is likewise highly developed and well-known to those skilled in the art.

In the art of directional drilling, several basic methods are known and employed. The most widely used method of changing the direction in which a well bore is being established is to arrange a wedge member in the bottom of a bore hole, in predetermined rotative position, which member serves to urge and direct the bit at the lower end of a string of drill pipe, laterally from its previous course. Such wedges are commonly referred to as whipstocks.

Another method of directional drilling i to provide a special tool in the lower end of a drilling string to engage the adjacent wall of the well bore and to urge the string, and its related bit, laterally in a new and desired direction.

Yet another method of directional drilling, referred to as spudding, involves the use of a special bit at the lower end of drill pipe string, which hit directs a fluid jet in the direction in which it is desired to establish new holes. The bit is reciprocated vertically adjacent the bottom of the well bore so that the fluid jet acts on and reduces, or washes away, the formation at one side of the bore hole. When the formation is sufliciently washed away or reduced by the action of the jet, the bit, in principal, is permitted to shift laterally and the direction of subsequently drilling or new hole is deflected relative to the hold or established previously established hole.

In the case of whipstock, and in those methods where special tools are engaged in the drilling string to urge them laterally in the bore holes, conventional rotary bits and rotary drilling methods are employed. That is, the

3,405,771 Patented Oct. 15, 1968 bits are rotated and advanced into the formation to establish new hole and the drilling strings are turned and torqued to a considerable extent.

The above-noted turning and torquing of the drilling string, when carrying out directional drilling operations, tends to and frequently does upset and alter the setting of the means employed to effect reflection of the bit and also tends to and frequently does cause the bit to drift ofl the desired course. Unfortunately, it is not until after such undesired deviation in direction is an accomplished fact, that it is discoverable and considerable time and expense is required to correct it.

In carrying out directional drilling operations with whipstocks, the angle or extent to which the bit and drilling string can be deflected is extremely limited and frequently requires several runs to achieve the desired deflection. That is, a number of Whipstocks must be set, in a series, as the well bore is advanced into the formation to achieve the desired deflection. Such a procedure necessarily requires a plurality of time-consuming and costly operations, any one or more of which might, as pointed out above, be ineffective and costly to correct.

The above-noted spudding method of directional drilling is only eflfective in those situations where the forrnation is sufiiciently soft and unstable to be effectively reduced by fluid jets. Accordingly, spudding is only employed in shallow wells where relatively soft formations are encountered.

Another special and effective method of directional drilling involves the provision of a hydraulic motor engageable in a drilling string between a rotary bit and a drill collar, immediately above the bit. The motor turns the bit relative to the drill string. With such a set-up it is possible to urge the lower end of the drilling string laterally with any desired or suitable oriented means and to then rotate the bit and advance the bit and the string so as to effect desired deflection of the well bore. While this rather special set-up overcomes many shortcomings found in the use of other available tools, and apparatus for directional drilling operations, it has been proved to be critically wanting in that the fluid motors are extremely costly to build, service and maintain and such motors are not suitably dependable.

An object of our invention is to provide a novel motor tool engageable between a drill string and rotary bit, which tool is such that it converts reciprocating motion to rotary motion and is effective to rotate the bit upon reciprocation of the drilling string.

Further, it is an object of our invention to provide a tool of the character referred to which is such that rotary motion of the drilling string can be directly transmitted through the tool to the bit, if such is desired.

Still further, it is an object of our invention to provide a tool of the character referred to which is such that it can act as a knocker, while converting axial or reciprocating motion to rotary motion and to thereby permit or allow for a combination of rotary and percussion drilling techniques.

Yet another object of our invention is to provide a tool of the character referred to and related apparatus, which permits reciprocation of the drilling string with resulting rotation of the bit and, if desired, knocking of the bit, without requiring the bit to be elevated or raised from engagement with the bottom of the established bore hole.

A further object of the invention is to provide an apparatus for drilling a well hole including a motor tool of the character referred to, a bit carried and driven by the motor tool, a string of drill collars of predetermined mass above and connected with the motor tool and an axially shiftable lost motion sub-tool at the upper end of the drill collars, whereby the axial and the torsional V 3 forces exerted onto and through the motor tool and bit can be accurately controlled.

It is yet another object of our invention to provide an apparatus of the character referred to above which includes an elbow or angle sub in the drilling string in or above the drill collars, which elbow sub can be arranged in any desired rotative position and causes the drilling string to bear on opposite sides of the well bore, or the casing therein, and'disposes the drill collars, motor tool and bit at a predetermined angle from the'longitudinal axis of the established bore hole.

' A further object of this invention is'to provide a motor tool of the character referred to which is easy and economical to manufacture, service and maintain and a tool which is rugged, durable and highly effective and dependable in operation.

An object of our invention is to provide an apparatus of the character referred to which is easy and economical to manufacture, assemble, service and maintain, which is easy, convenient and accurate in effectively deflecting a well bore and'which is rugged and dependable in operation.

These and other objects and features of our invention will be fully understood from the following detailed description of a typical form and application of our invention, throughout which description reference is made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of a well structure with the apparatus that we provide arranged therein;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of our new motor tool, taken substantially as indicated by line 22 on FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged detailed sectional view taken substantially as indicated by line 33 on FIG. 2, having parts removed to better illustrate the details of the construction;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken substantially as indicated by line 4-4 on FIG. 3, without parts removed and showing the parts in another position; and,

FIG. 5 is an isometric view of the loss motion sub such as is employed in our new apparatus.

The motor tool A that we provide includes an elongate vertical tubular barrel B with a downwardly opening, longitudinally extending cylindrical bore 10, a head 11 at the upper end of the barrel defining a downwardly disposed stop shoulder 12 adjacent the upper end of the bore and having a tool joint member at its upper end to cooperate with a mating tool joint member on a related tool or drill collar.

In the case illustrated, the tool joint member on the head is shown as an upwardly projecting threaded pin 14 and is shown engaged in a threaded box 15 in the lower end of the related drill collar 16.

The head is further provided with a central flow passage 17 to communicate with and conduct circulating fluid between the flow passage 18 in the drill collar 16 and the bore 10 of the barrel B.

The lower end of the barrel B is povided with or carries a releasable drive means P, which drive means will be fully described in the following.

The motor tool A, in addition to the barrel B and releasable drive means F, includes a driven column C.

The column C includes an elongate vertically extending cylindrical member 20, which member is slightly longer in longitudinal extent than the bore 10 in the barrel .B and which is slidably engaged in said bore to depend from the lower end of the barrel.

The member 20 of the column C is provided at its upper end with the bumper head 21 having a flat top surface 22 to oppose and engage the stop shoulder or surface 12 of the barrel head 11.

The head 21 is provided with suitable sealing means s to seal between the bore 10 of the barrel and the upper end of the column. In the case illustrated, the means S is shown as involving a pair of radially outwardly opening, axially spaced, grooves 23 and O-ring seals 23 in the grooves and engaging the barrel bore 10. i

The lower end of the driven column C is provided with an enlargement 24 defining a tool joint to connect the column with a related tool, such as a rotary bit E.

The tool joint on or in the enlargement 24 is shown as a threaded box 25 in which a threaded pin 26 on the bit E is engaged.

The driven column C is provided with a central longitudinal flow passage 27 communicating with and adapted to conduct circulating fiuid between the bore 10 in the barrel and a fluid passage 28 in the bit E, which passage 28 conducts fluid to suitable nozzles in the bit construction, in accordance with common practice, 7

Finally, the member 20 of the driven column C is pro vided with at least one, but preferably-two or more, radially outwardly opening helical grooves 30 having radially outwardly disposed bottoms 31, radially outwardly extending, downwardly and circumferentially disposed upper drive surface or inclined planes 32 and radially outwardly, upwardly and circumferentially disposed lower surfaces or inclined planes 33.

The reversible drive means F includes a drive sleeve 40 slidably engaged about the member 20, below the barrel B, radially inwardly projecting cam lugs '41 carried by the sleeve 40 and slidably engaged in the grooves 30, clutch means G between the barrel and the sleeve and releasably establishing driving engagement between the barrel and the sleeve. The clutch means G is a simple, jaw-type clutch and includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced, teeth 42 on and about the lower end of the barrel B and a plurality of circumferentially spaced teeth 43 on and about the upper end of the sleeve 40 and opposing and adapted to mate with the teeth 42.

By shifting the sleeves 40 downwardly relative to the barrel a distance slightly greater than the depth of the teeth, the clutch means is disengaged and the sleeve is free to rotate relative to the barrel. Upon shifting the sleeve upwardly relative to the barrel, or shifting the barrel down-wardly relative to the sleeve, the clutch means is engaged and positive driving engagement is established between the barrel and the sleeve.

The drive means further includes a tubular cage 45 threaded on the lower end of the barrel, as at 46 and depending therefrom to surround or occur about the sleeve 40 with running clearance. The cage 45 depends below the lower end of the sleeve and is provided with a radially inwardly projecting retaining flange 47 on which an anti-friction bearing 48 is seated.

The bearing 48 rotatably supports the sleeve 40 when the sleeve is shifting downwardly relative to the barrel and when the clutch means is disengage-d.

In operation, when the barrel is shifted upwardly relative to the driven column, as by elevating the drill collars 16 and the elements or parts of the drilling string occurring above the collars, the sleeve, by its weight and by the frictional drag between the cam lugs 41 and the grooves 30, is shifted downwardly into supported engagement on the bearing 48 and the clutch means is disengaged. Upon further upward shifting of the barrel relative to the column C, the lugs follow the grooves and the sleeve rotates freely until the cam lugs reach and stop at the upper end of the grooves.

Note, that when the barrel is shifted upwardly, the cam lugs ride on the lower inclined planes or surfaces 33 of the grooves.

Upon subsequent downward shifting of the barrel B relative to the column C the sleeve 40 is, by virtue of the frictional resistance between the sleeve and the column and the cam lugs and the grooves, shifted upwardly so that the clutch means is engaged and driving engagement is established between the barrel and the sleeve.

Upon subsequent downward shifting of the barreland sleeve, the lugs carried by the sleeve bear against the upper inclined planes or surfaces 32 of the grooves and rotate the column and the bit E related thereto, relative to the barrel.

Accordingly, by reciprocating the drilling string above the tool A, the bit E can be intermittently rotated without rotating the drilling string.

By lowering the barrel to its lowermost position, the shoulder or surface 12 of the barrel head strikes the top surface of the knocker head on the column C and an impact is transmitted through the tool and bit, to the formation, to effect percussion reduction of the formation.

It is extremely important to note that the bit E is not elevated from engagement on the bottom of the established bore hole during operation of our construction.

By varying the longitudinal extent of the barrel and column and by varying the pitch of the grooves, the number of revolutions of the bit, upon each stroke or downward shifting of the barrel, relative to the column, can be advantageously controlled.

By reducing the pitch of the grooves, a greater number of revolutions per stroke can be gained, and a greater amount of axial force is required to effect operation of the motor.

The increase in force required to operate the motor also increases the direct axial force or weight applied onto and through the bit E. Accordingly, the force exerted onto and through the bit can be controlled.

It will be apparent that as the pitch is varied to control the weight applied to the bit and the weight force required to effect operation of the tool is varied, the weight force required for satisfactory operation can be controlled from the top of the well or can be controlled at the bottom of the well by varying the amount and mass of heavy drill collar or collars provided immediately above the tool.

In practice, and as illustrated, the pitch of the upper end portions of the grooves can be increased to be substantially parallel with the axis of the construction so that upon initial downward movement of the barrel, an extremely high-weight torque ratio is provided to ini tiate or start rotation of the column and bit. Once such rotation is started, less force is required to continue rotation and greater axial force can be transmitted through the construction. Accordingly, the pitch of the grooves can, as shown, decrease as they continue downwardly to efiectively increase the number of revolutions and to increase the axial force applied by the bit onto the formation.

It is to be noted that since the cam lugs 41 are greater in longitudinal extent than the Width of the grooves and since the said lugs are fixed and integrally formed on the sleeve, the high pitched upper portions of the grooves 30 are made wider or greater in width than their low pitched lower portions, to accommodate the lugs.

It will be apparent that fluid pressure acting upon the top of the column C, within the barrel, holds the column and bit downwardly and in contact with the bottom of the bore hole upon upward shifting of the barrel.

'Suflicient weight on the downstroke, overcomes the effect of the fluid acting upon the top of the colunm so that no fluid locking action, which would impede operation of this tool, will occur.

In practice, a bi-pass port 60 can be provided between the flow passage in the column and the upper end of each groove to conduct clean drilling fluid into the grooves.

Such drilling fluid acts as a lubricant and also flushes out any cuttings, and the like, that might otherwise migrate into the grooves and foul operation of the construction.

Also, ports 61 and 62 can be provided in the cage adjacent the clutch means and adjacent the bearing 48, through which mud and like, which might otherwise accumulate in the clutch means and between the sleeve and the bearing, can be displaced as the construction is operated.

The apparatus for directional drilling that we provide, which is illustrated in FIG. 1 of the drawings and which includes our new motor tool, involves the bit E, the motor tool A connected with and extending upwardly from the bit, a length or stand of drill collars 16 fixed to and extending above the tool A, an elbow :or angle sub H fixed to the upper end of the collars 16, an axially extensible or low lost motion sub I fixed to the upper end of the sub H; a string of drill pipe P extending from the sub I to the top of the well and an elevator J -at the upper end of the string P and connected with a suitable circulating hose K.

The elbow or angle sub H is a simple short sub with the axes of its upper and lower ends disposed at an angle of from three degrees to ten degrees.

The lost motion sub I is a simple bumper sub type of construction capable of equal or greater axial movement than the tool A.

In FIG. 5 of the drawings, we have illustrated a typical bumper sub type construction as might be advantageously employed in carrying out our invention. Since the exact construction of the sub I can vary widely without aliecting or altering the invention, and since such constructions are well known to those skilled in the art, detailed description of the sub I will be dispensed with.

When the drilling string assembly illustrated in FIG. 1 of the drawings is lowered into the well, the elbow sub H creates a bend in the string which causes that sub to bear on one side of the well bore and which causes those portions of the string occurring above and below that sub, to bear on diametrically opposite sides of the well bore.

Accordingly, the portion of the string occurring below the sub H, that is, the drill collars 16, tool A and bit E, are on a common axis angularly related to those portions of the drilling string occurring above the sub H and angularly related to the longitudinal axis of the established well bore.

Since the rotative position of the sub H is known and tfixed, it is possible, by employing any convenient means of orientation, to orient the sub H and the portion of the string therebelow so that the said portion of the string occurring below the sub H and particularly the bit E, are disposed in predetenmined angular relationship to the axis of the Well bore.

Upon orienting the drilling string in the manner set forth above, the drill pipe P is elevated and the sub I is extended fully. Upon subsequent elevation of the drill pipe string P, the lower portion of the string is elevated and the tool A is extended (the bit remaining on bottom).

When the tool is fully extended the drill pipe string is lowered, collapsing or shortening the sub I and permitting the weight of the structure therebelow to actuate the tool A.

At this point it should be noted that the sub I prevents application of excessive weight on the tool A and permits the portion of the string below the sub I to be operated independently of the weight and efiect of the drill pipe string above the sub. This is highly important, as rapidly lowering and applying the weight of the pipe string above the sub onto and through the remainder of the construction would tend to cause twisting and collapsing of the string in such a manner as to upset orientation of the structure.

After the tool A is actuated or cycled, as set forth above, the string P can again be elevated and the structure re-cycled, as desired.

It will be apparent that the new hole established will be angularly disposed to the old or previously established hole and that upon continued operation of the apparatus, and the establishment of new hole, the angle of the new hole will progressively change angle, as desired, with the result that any desired amount of deflection can be established with a single run of our new tool and apparatus.

It is to be noted that when the tool A has been actuated and bottomed out, that is, when the barrel has reached its lowermost position and the sub I is bottomed out, that is, when it is in its collapsed or completely shortened position, the entire weight of the string can be applied to and through the bit and the string can be rotated and new hole established in a conventional manner. In this situation, the sub I and tool A become inoperative.

It will also be apparent that when the tool A is bottomed out and inoperative, as set forth above, the string can be rotated in a conventional manner even though the sub I is not bottomed out. In this situation, the weight applied onto and through the bit is limited to the weight of that portion of the string occurring between the bit and the sub.

If conventional rotary drilling operations are carried out and suflicient resistance is afforded by the bit to cause the barrel of the tool A to rotate about the column C and thereby cause the lugs 41 to ride up in the grooves 30 and to thereby extend the tool A, such extending and resulting jacking up of the string will stop when the lugs reach the upper ends of the grooves and the operation can be continued without further or adverse effect.

Having described only a typical preferred form and application of our invention, we do not wish to be limited to the specific details herein set forth, but wish to reserve to ourselves any modifications and/ or variations that may appear to those skilled in the art and which fall within the scope of the following claims:

Having described our invention, we claim:

1. A deep well motor tool of the character referred to including, an elongate vertical barrel with fluid conducting means at its upper end to connect with a part in a drilling string, an elongate, tubular, fluid conducting column slidably engaged in the barrel and having a lower end depending therefrom, said column having means at its lower end to connect with a part in a drilling string, an elongate longitudinally extending radially outwardly opening helical groove, and sealing means at its upper end to seal between the column and the barrel, and drive means between the barrel and the column to rotate the column relative to the barrel upon downward shifting of the barrel relative to the column, said drive means including a drive sleeve adjacent the lower end of the barrel surrounding the column, a cam lug on the sleeve and engaged in the groove, and releasable clutch means between the barrel and the sleeve to establish driving engagement between the sleeve and the barrel upon downward shifting of the barrel relative to the column.

2. A structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein, said sleeve is carried by the barrel for limited axial shifting relative thereto and said clutch means include a plurality of circumferentially spaced, depending, jaw teeth at the lower end of the barrel and a plurality of circumferentially spaced, upwardly projecting jaw teeth at the upper end of the sleeve and shiftable into and out of engagement with said depending teeth.

3. A structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein, the upper end of the barrel is provided with a downwardly disposed stop surface and the upper end of the column is provided with a knocker head adapted to be engaged by the stop surface.

4. A structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein, said sleeve is carried by the barrel for limited axial shifting relative thereto and said clutch means include a plurality of circumferentially spaced, depending jaw teeth at the lower end of the barrel and a plurality of circumferentially spaced, upwardly projecting jaw teeth at the upper end of the sleeve and shiftable into and out of engagement with said depending teeth, the upper end of the barrel being provided with a downwardly disposed stop surface and the upper end of the column provided with a knocker head adapted to be engaged by the stop surface.

5. A structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein, the pitch of the groove is increased at its upper end and terminates to establish a stop against which the lug stops to limit downward movement of the column relative to the barrel.

6. A structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein, said sleeve is carried by the barrel for limited axial shifting relative thereto and said clutch means including. a plurality of circumferentially spaced, depending jaw teeth at the lower end of the barrel and a plurality of circumferentially spaced, upwardly projecting jaw teeth at the upper end of the sleeve and shiftable into and out of engagement with said depending teeth, the upper end of the barrel being provided with a downwardly'disposed stop surface and the upper end of the column provided with a knocker head adapted to be engaged by the stop surface, the pitch of the groove being increased at its upper end and terminating to establish a stop against which the lug stops to limit downward movement of the column relative to the barrel.

' 7. A structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein, said sleeve is carried for free rotation and limited axial shifting by a cage fixed to and depending from the lower end of the barrel and carrying a bearing upon which the lower end of the sleeve can seat, said clutch means including fixed jaws at the upper end of the cage and jaws at the upper end of the sleeve, and adapted to be shifted into and out of engagement with the fixed jaws upon reltive axial shifting of the barrel and column.

8. A structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein, said sleeve is carried for free rotation and limited axial shifting by a cage fixed to and depending from the lower end of the barrel and carrying a bearing upon which the lower end of the sleeve can seat, said clutch means including fixed jaws at the upper end of the cage and jaws at the upper end of the sleeve, and adapted to be shifted into and out of engagement with the fixed jaws upon relative axial shifting of the barrel and column, the upper end of the barrel is provided with a downwardly disposed stop surface and the upper end of the column is provided with a knocker head adapted to be engaged by the stop surface, said column having a central longitudinal flow passage, a by-pa-ss port establishing communication between the flow passage and the upper end of the groove to conduct fluid from within the column into the groove.

9. A structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein, said sleeve is carried for free rotation and limited axial shifting by a cage fixed to and depending from the lower end of the barrel and carrying a bearing upon which the lower end of the sleeve can seat, said clutch means including fixed jaws at the upper end of the cage and jaws at the upper end of the sleeve, and adapted to be shifted into and out of engagement with the fixed jaw upon relative axial shifting of the barrel and column, the upper end of the barrel is provided with a downwardly disposed stop surface and the upper end of the column is provided with a knocker head adapted to be engaged by and the stop surface, said column having a central longitudinal flow passage, a by-pass port establishing communication between the fiow passage and the upper end of the groove to conduct fluid from within the column into the groove, and radially outwardly opening ports in the cage adjacent the clutch and adjacent the bearing to exhaust matter from between the jaws of the clutch and between the bearing and the sleeve when said sleeve is shifted axially in the cage.

10. A structure as set forth in claim 1 wherein, said sleeve is carried for free rotation and limited axial shifting by a cage fixed to and depending from the lower end of the barrel and carrying a bearing upon which the lower end of the sleeve can seat, said clutch means including fixed jaws at the upper end of the cage and jaws at the upper end of the sleeve, and adapted to be shifted into and out of engagement with the fixed jaws upon relative axial shifting of the barrel and column, the upper end of the barrel is provided with a downwardly disposed stop surface and the upper end of the column is provided with a knocker head adapted to be engaged by the stop surface, said column having a central longitudinal flow passage, 21 by-pass port establishing communication be-- tween the fiow passage and the upper end of the groove to conduct fluid from within the column into the groove,

and radially outwardly opening ports in the case adjacent the clutch and adjacent the bearing to exhaust matter from between the jaws of the clutch and between the bearing and the sleeve when said sleeve is shifted axially in the cage, the pitch of the groove being increased at its upper end and terminating to establish a stop against which the lug stops to limit downward movement of the column relative to the barrel.

11. A directional drilling apparatus including, a rotary bit, a motor tool fixed to and extending upwardly from the bit, a string of drill collars fixed to and extending upwardly from the motor tool, an elbow sub fixed to the upper end of the drill collar string, an axially shiftable lost motion sub fixed to and extending upwardly from the elbow sub, a drill pipe string fixed to and extending upwardly from the lost motion sub, and an elevator at the upper end of the drill pipe string, said motor tool including an elongate barrel fixed to and depending from the lower end of the drill collar string, a column with a helical groove fixed to and projecting upwardly from the bit and slidably engaged in the barrel, a drive sleeve rotatably carried by the lower end of the barrel for limited axial movement and free relative rotation and having a radially inwardly projecting cam lug slidably engaged in the groove, and clutch means between the sleeve and the barrel to establish driving engagement between the barrel and the sleeve when the barrel is shifted downwardly relative to the column and the sleeve and to break said driving engagement when the barrel is shifted upwardly relative to the column, said apparatus adapted to be engaged in a well hole with said elevator at the top of the hole, the bit engaged on the bottom of the hole, and the elbow sub engaging one side of the hole above the bottom thereof whereby the axes of the strings of drill collar and drill pipe are angularly related to the axis of the hole, said elevator drill pipe string and lost motion sub being adapted to be intermittently elevated "to intermittently elevate the elbow sub, drill collar string and motor tool barrel relative to the motor tool column and the bit and being adapted to be intermittently lowered whereby the elbow sub, drill collar string and motor tool barrel are free to shift downwardly relative to the motor tool column to apply their weight onto and through the bit and to rotate the bit.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,002,385 5/1935 Bannister 175106 2,002,386 5/1935 Bannister 175-106 X 2,013,070 9/1935 Sheridan 175-106 X 2,287,157 6/1942 Wolfi 175-106 NILE C. BYERS, 111., Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5316094 *Oct 20, 1992May 31, 1994Camco International Inc.Well orienting tool and/or thruster
US5373898 *Oct 25, 1993Dec 20, 1994Camco International Inc.Rotary piston well tool
US6082453 *Feb 5, 1997Jul 4, 2000Bakke Oil Tools AsOrientation device, particularly for drilling tool or a well equipment
US7174958 *Feb 20, 2003Feb 13, 2007Robert Patrick AppletonDrill string member
US8657040 *Mar 19, 2009Feb 25, 2014Smith International, Inc.Percussion drilling assembly and locking system therefor
US20090133934 *Aug 11, 2006May 28, 2009Josef MocivnikMethod and device for releasing a block on a bore crown during a boring process
US20100236835 *Mar 19, 2009Sep 23, 2010Smith International, Inc.Percussion Drilling Assembly and Locking System Therefor
US20120285743 *Jan 20, 2011Nov 15, 2012Bdc Investments Ltd.Wellbore obstruction clearing tool and method of use
USRE36166 *Apr 24, 1996Mar 30, 1999Smith International, Inc.Air percussion drilling assembly for directional drilling applications
USRE36848 *Jun 18, 1996Sep 5, 2000Smith International, Inc.Air percussion drilling assembly
WO1997030262A1 *Feb 5, 1997Aug 21, 1997Bakke Oil Tools A SAn orientation device, particularly for a drilling tool or a well equipment
Classifications
U.S. Classification175/73
International ClassificationE21B7/06, E21B6/00, E21B7/04
Cooperative ClassificationE21B7/06, E21B6/00
European ClassificationE21B7/06, E21B6/00