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Publication numberUS3406977 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 22, 1968
Filing dateDec 14, 1965
Priority dateDec 14, 1965
Publication numberUS 3406977 A, US 3406977A, US-A-3406977, US3406977 A, US3406977A
InventorsVoelkerding Frank J
Original AssigneeFrank J. Voelkerding
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable golf tee and sight
US 3406977 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1968 F. J. VOELKERDING 3,406,977

ADJUSTABLE GOLF TEE AND SIGHT 1 Filed Dec. 14, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet l 1 6.. 6 Hum/(d 1651x2252? 1968 F. J. VOELKERDING 3,406,977

ADJUSTABLE GOLF TEE AND SIGHT Filed Dec. 14, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 H0 [/3 H2 1/! [(3 INVENTOR.

Fw /(J. Vm mw/wa BY fi /W ATTORNEY:-

United States Patent 3,406,977 1 ADJUSTABLE GOLF TEE AND SIGHT Frank J. Voelkerding, 230 S. Woodlawn, Lake City, Iowa 51449 Filed Dec. 14, 1965, Ser. No. 513,717 8 Claims. (Cl. 273-202) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A base member supports at one end thereof a vertically adjustable golf ball tee and at the other end a pivotaliy mounted sighting device alignable with the golfing target. A' bubble level is mounted on the base intermediate its ends. The end of the base member supporting the sighting device is adjustable to positions toward and away from the end of the base supporting the golf ball tee.

This invention relates to an adjustable golf tee and sight therefor and has as its primary object the provision of an improved tee which will enable a golfer to drive more effectively and reduce the likelihood of his slicing, hooking, topping or skying the ball.

An additional object of the invention is the provision of a golf tee of a substantial, permanent nature characterized by improved means for adjusting the height of the tee from the base in accordance with conditions,

A further important object of the invention is the provision of a sight on the tee base adjacent the tee and ball, which will enable the golfer to concentrate on the sight and by alignment of the club head therewith relative to the ball to ensure more accurate drives.

' A further object of the invention is the provision of means and association with such tee for assuring the level positioning of the tee, and hence the relative position of the sight and tee.

Still another object of the invention is the provision of a sight or sighting ball which when not in use or when its use is not desired may be folded to an out of the way position.

Still another object of the invention is the provision of a device of this character which is sturdy and durable in construction, reliable and efficient in-operation, and relatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture and utilize.

Still other objects reside in the combinations of elements, arrangements of parts, and features of construction, all as will be more fully pointed out hereinafter and disclosed in the accompanying drawing wherein there are shown preferred embodiments of this inventive concept.

In the drawing:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of one form of tee, a sight, and level, constructed in accordance with the instant invention, certain concealed parts thereof being indicated in dotted lines. V v

FIGURE 2 is a top plan view thereof.

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 3-3 of FIGURE 1 as viewed in the direction indicated by the arrows.

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 44 of FIGURE 2 as viewed in the direction indicated by the arrows. 1

FIGURE 5 is a view similar to a modified form of construction.

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 6-6 of FIGURE 5 as viewed in the direction indicated by the arrows.

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary view showing a portion of the structure of FIGURE 5 in a ditierent position of adjustment.

FIGURE 4 shown in ice FIGURE 8 is a side elevational view of a still further modified form of construction.

FIGURE 9 is a top plan view of the structure of FIG- URE 8, alternative positions of adjustment being indicated in dotted lines.

FIGURE 10 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 10-10 of FIGURE 8.

FIGURES 11, 12 and 13 are plan views partially in elevation and partially in section disclosing various modified forms of slides adapted to be utilized in conjunction with the modification of FIGURES 8 and 9.

FIGURES l4, 15, 16 and 17 are fragmentary, transverse sectional views showing diiferent forms of slides adapted to be used in conjunction with the device of FIGURES 8 and 9.

FIGURE 18 is a top plan view of a modified form of adjustable tee, and

FIGURE 19 is a side view partially in section and partially in elevation of the tee of FIGURE 18.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the drawing.

Having reference now to the drawing in detail and more particularly to the species of the invention disclosed in FIGURES l to 4 inclusive, there is generally indicated at 20 a golf tee and sighting device constructed in accordance with the instant invention. In this form of the invention an elongated, substantially rectangular base 21 is provided at one end with an enlarged circular boss 22 having an internal bore 23 provided with a series of annular detent rings 24. A tee comprising an elongated stem 25 and a ball receiving socket 26 has an annular detent engag-' ing ring 27 surrounding its lower extremity, the arrangement being such that the tee may be pushed into the socket so that ring 27 will engage in the selected one of the detents 24 holding the tee in the selected position of adjustment according to height as desired.

A central portion of the base 21 contains a recess 28 in which is positioned a bubble of mercury 29, covered by a concave glass 30, the glass being provided with a central circle 31 and held in position by an annular rim 32. The arrangement is such that when the base 21 is perfectly level the mercury bubble will be centered in the circle 31. At the opposite side of base 21 from the tee there is a sighting device which is comprised of a raised lug 33, having an internal spherical recess 34 and a slot on its inner side 35. The recess 34 contains a ball 36, which comprises one component of a ball sight, ball 36 being connected to a stem 37 at the opposite end of which is a sighting ball 38. The arrangement is such that the ball may be extended to full line or sighting position as shown in FIGURES l, 2 and 3, or may be moved through the slot 35 to an out of the way position as shown in dotted lines in FIGURE 4. Pointed projections 40 extend from the underside of base 21 for precluding slippage of the device after positioning.

In the use and operation of the device the base 21 is first suitably positioned on the driving surface, or on the fairway, or any other locality where it is desired to use the same. The positioning includes the aligning of the ball sight 38, which is pivoted upwardly to its operative position, with the center of the golf ball receiving socket 26, and with the desired target which may comprise the greens flag marker, its standard, a desired point on the fairway, or any other visible sighting object. In effecting this three point alignment, the golf ball receiving socket 26 always comprises one of the aligned elements, and care is taken to maintain the base level by observing the position of the level bubble aforedescribed.

The tee is then adjusted to a selected height, and a ball B is placed thereon. The golfer, upon addressing the ball, may align the face of the club with either the ball B or the ball sight 38, whichever may be the most 3-. convenient, andif the golf club head is properly swung through its downstroke to swing in an arc which substantially follows a straight line drawn between the vertical axes of the stems 25 and 37, the golf ball upon impact will take flight in a substantially straight line and in the direction of the sighting object.

FIGURES 5 and 6 disclose a modified form of construction wherein a base 50 includes a lug 51 at one end having a central bore 52 and a series of vertically spaced horizontally aligned apertures 53 spaced about the periphery thereof. The tee includes a stem 54 having a plurality of proturberances 55 adjacent its lower extremity in a ball receiving socket 57. Height adjustment is effected by aligning the proturberances 55 with a selected opening or series of openings 53. In this modification two levels arev employed, each being disposed in a recess 58 and 59 respectively, one being aligned with a longitudinal extent of the base 50 as indicated at 60, and of concavo-convex shape so that centering of the bubble will determine the level of the tee in a direction according to its length or transverse to the direction of drive, and the other, as indicated at 61 being extended transversely of the tee, but in alignment with the direction of the swing, and showing that the strip is level in this direction.

The levels 60 and 61 are retained in place by annuli or beads 62 and 63 respetcively, Protuberances 64 positioned in a manner similar to the previously described protuberances 40 maintain the tee at FIGURES 5 and 6 in position. In this modification of the device the ball sight includes a mounting lug or protuberance 65 having a slot 66 in one side thereof, and a flat shank or stem 67 pivotally mounted on a pin 68 so that it may fold into the slot 66. At the outer end of the shank 67 is a ball sight 69 substantially identical to the previously described ball sight 38, and the use and operation of this form of device is substantially identical to that previously discussed. FIGURE 7 is a sectional view through a slightly modified form of tee including a base 70, a protuberance 71 having an adjustable tee 72, which may be identical to the previously described tee 56, 57. The base in this instance instead of being provided with the protuberances or spikes 64, is equipped with a non-slip resilient plastic or rubber sheet 73, by means of which the device may be pushed or positioned on a wood surface, a stone outcropping or the like.

FIGURES 8, 9 and disclose a further modified form of constuction. In this form of device there is provided an elongated base 80 having pointed projections 81 on the underside thereof and the protuberance 82 at one end. Protuberance or lug 82 is provided with a threaded bore 83 into which the threaded shank 84 of a tee is positioned. The shank 84 has a ball receiving head 85 which is adapted to support a ball B. A level 86 is carried in a socket 87 in the manner substantially identical to that of the previously described modification, except that the level is mounted on the inner end of an extensible portion or slide 90 of base 80. The extensible portion comprises a separate member which is slidable in suitable grooves 82' cut interiorly of a recess 83 extending from one open end of base member 80 and in this form of the invention includes laterally extending tongues 84 which engage in the grooves to insure proper alignment. A projection or spike 85' extends from the outer end or slide 90 and a protuberance 91 having a spherical aperture 92 therein carries a ball 93 secured to a shank 94 which in turn carries a ball sight 95 substantially identical to the previously described ball sights 38 and 69. A slot 96 may be provided if desired to facilitate and permit folding of the sight as in the previously described modifications. In the use of this form of device the operation is substantially identical except that the distance between the ball sight 95 and the tee 84,85 may be suitably varied in accordance with the individual preferance of the user thereof.

FIGURES 11, 12 and 13 disclose various means for retaining a slide such as the slide in a preselected position of adjustment relative to the base. In FIGURE 11, the base is identified by the reference numeral 96' and, as in the preceding embodiment of FIGURES 8 to 10, inclusive, base 96 is provided with a recess 96A which extends inwardly from one end thereof. The base 96' is also provided with a pair of opposed longitudinally extending grooves 96B, 963. The slide of this'ernbodiment of the invention bears the reference numeral 97 and, as is shown in FIGURE 11, this slide is also provided with a pair of opposed longitudinally extending tongues 97. The tongues 97 are adapted to be slidably received within the grooves 96'B, all in the manner heretofore described, and each groove 96'B is provided with one or more protuberances 98 which are adapted to be releasably received within detent receiving recesses 99 to hold the tongue 97 in an adjusted position relative to the base 96'.

In the embodiment of FIGURE 12, the base is identified by reference numeral 100 and as is shown in thils figure, the base 100 is provided with a recess 100'A which extends inwardly from an end thereof, The base 100 is also formed with the opposed grooves 100B, 100B which are adapted to slidably receive the opposed longitudinally extending tongues 101, 101' of the slide 101. Disposed in one of the grooves 100B is a protuberance or point 103 which is adapted to be releasably received between a pair of serrations 102 formed in the adjacent one of the tongues 101.

In FIGURE 13 the base is identified by reference numeral having a recess 105A extending inwardly from an end thereof, and the recess 105A is, as before, in open communication with a pair of opposed longitudinally extending grooves 105'B. The base 105 is formed with a pair of laterally spaced and substantially parallel lines of serrations or ribs 107 which extend upwardly from the bottom of the recess 105A adjacent each longitudinally extending side thereof. The slide of this embodiment of the invention bears the reference numeral 104 having opposed tongues 104', 104' adapted for sliding engagement within the grooves 105'B, 105'B. The slide 104 is provided, adjacent to each longitudinally extending side edge thereof, with a plurality of serrations or ribs 107 on the underside thereof and adjacent each of the tongues 104. The serrations or ribs 106, 107 are adpated to releasably interlock with one another to hold the slide 104 in an adjusted position relative to its associated base 105.

It is within the purview of this invention to provide base and slide means of typesother than those which have been described above. Such modifications are shown in FIGURES 14 to 17, inclusive, and with specific reference to FIGURE 14, it will be seen that the base, here identified by reference numeral 110 is formed with a longitudinally extending opening 110' which extends transversely therethrough from side to side thereof. The base 110 is also formed with a pair of opposed confronting and substantially parallel grooves 111 which open into the opening 110. The slide of this embodiment of the invention carries the reference numeral 112 and, at its longitudinally extending opposed sides, is formed with protruding tongues 113 which are adapted to be slidably received within the grooves 111. Preferably, the opposed sides of the slide 111 are coplanar with the opposed sides, respectively, of the base 110.

The fragmentary detail cross-sectional views of FIG- URES l5 and 16 may be related back to the embodiment of this invention as is illustrated in FIGURES 8 to 10, inelusive. In FIGURE 10 the grooves 82, 82 and the tongues 84', 84 are shown as having, essentially, rectangular configurations complementing one another. Such configurations are not critical to the successful operation of this invention. In FIGURE 15 the base is identified by reference numeral 114 and is shown as having a recess 114' extending inwardly from one side thereof, the recess 114' being closed by the bottom wall 115. The base 114 is provided, as before, with a pair of opposed longitudinally extending side walls 114" (only one being shown) and each side Wall 114" is formed with an inwardly extending V-shaped groove 117. A slide member 116 is slidably engaged with the bottom wall 115 and, at its opposed longitudinally extending sides is formed with relatively sharp pointed or V-shaped tongues 118 which are adapted to be slidably received within the adjacent confronting and complementary groove 114".

A related construction is shown in FIGURE 16 wherein the base 121 is formed with a longitudinally extending recess 121 having side walls 120 (only one of which is shown). Each side wall 120 is provided with rounded grooves 122 which open towards each other and are in open communication with the recess 121'. The slide of this embodiment bears the reference numeral 124 and each opposed longitudinally extending side edge of the slide 124 is formed with an outwardly extending rounded tongue 123 for sliding engagement within the adjacent one of the grooves 122.

FIGURE 17 may be related back to the embodiment illustrated in FIGURE 14 as comprising substantially the converse thereof. In FIGURE 17 the base 125 is formed with a transversely extending opening 125' which extends transversely therethrough from side to side thereof. Here the opposed side walls of the base 125 defining the opening 125' are formed with laterally projecting tongues 126 disposed in confronting relationship relative to one another, the latter being adapted to be slidably received within complementing grooves 127 formed in the opposed side edges of the slide 128.

Obviously other forms of slide detents or other forms of tongue and groove slide mechanisms may be provided if desired.

FIGURES 18 and 19 disclose a tee 130 having an internal bore with a fast thread helix therein accommodated on a correspondingly pitched thread 132 carried by a stud 133 mounted on a base 134 similar to base 80. A relatively wide flange 135 surrounds the base of tee 130, and carries indicia thereon, as seen in FIGURE 18, which by its relationship with an indicator 136 on base 134 discloses visually the height to which tee 130 is adjusted.

It is to be understood that any of the components of any of the modifications herein shown and described are adapted to be interchangeable with any of the components of any of the other modifications.

In the foregoing it will now be seen that there is herein provided an improved golf tee which accomplishes all the objects of this invention and others, including many advantages of great practical utility and commercial importance.

As many embodiments may be made of this inventive concept andas many modifications may be made in the embodiments hereinbefore shown and described, it is to be understood that all matter here is to be interpreted merely as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. In a device of the character described, in combination, an elongated base having a pair of opposed ends, a supporting boss adjacent one of its said ends and projecting upwardly from an upper surface thereof, a golf tee adjustably supported on said boss for linear movement towards and away from said upper surface of said base, said base having a lug fixedly connected thereon adjacent the other of its said ends and projecting upwardly from said upper surface, said lug having an internal substantially spherical recess formed therein intermediate its ends and a slot extending downwardly from the upper end of said lug and opening into said spherical recess, said slot also opening through a side of said lug in the direction of said boss, sighting means comprising an elongated stem having a pair of opposed ends and an enlarged spherical member connected on each of its said ends, respectively, said stern being disposed within said slot with one of said spherical members journaled for rotation in said spherical recess with the second of said spherical members being disposed above the upper end of said lug, said stem being movable within said slot so that said second spherical member may be moved to a first operative position adjacent to but spaced above the upper end of said lug and a second inoperative position wherein said second spherical member is disposed adjacent said upper surface and positioned intermediate said boss and lug, and visual level indicator means disposed on said top surface of said base intermediate said lug and boss.

2. The structure of claim 1 wherein said supporting boss is provided with a vertically extending bore having vertically spaced internally located annular rings formed therein, and said tee includes an elongated stem having detent means thereon selectively engageable with one of said rings to hold said tee at selective heights above said upper surface.

3. The structure of claim 1 wherein said supporting boss is provided with a threaded vertical bore and said tee includes a threaded stern rotatably engageable in said bore.

4. The structure of claim 1 wherein said supporting boss includes a vertical bore having vertically spaced apertures in the interior wall thereof and said tee includes a stem having protuberances thereon selectively engageable With said apertures.

5. The structure of claim 1 wherein said base is provided with ground engaging pins on the underside thereof.

6. The structure of claim 1 wherein said base includes a resilient friction surface on the underside thereof.

7. The structure of claim 1 wherein said level indicating means comprises a bubble type level.

8. The structure of claim 1 wherein said supporting boss is provided with a bore having axially spaced internally located annular rings formed therein, said tee includes an elongated stem having detent means thereon selectively engageable with one of said rings to hold said tee at selective heights above said upper surface, said base having ground engaging pins projecting laterally from the lower surface thereof, and said level indicating means is of the bubble level type.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,419,636 6/1922 MacDonald 273-196 X 1,936,625 11/ 1933 Goldman 273-203 2,712,939 7/1955 Harp 273-495 X 2,919,491 1/1960 Darrell et al 273----162 X FOREIGN PATENTS 383,767 1932 Great Britain.

ANTON O. OECHSLE, Primary Examiner.

GEORGE J. MARLO, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1419636 *Nov 15, 1920Jun 13, 1922Macdonald James MTest and practice apparatus for golf players
US1936625 *Jul 1, 1931Nov 28, 1933Benjamin GoldmanGolf tee and support therefor
US2712939 *Apr 2, 1953Jul 12, 1955Harp Sidney HGolf swing indicator
US2919491 *Dec 3, 1957Jan 5, 1960George H DarrellLevel indicating putter
GB383767A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3690676 *Jan 26, 1971Sep 12, 1972Costa FrankGolf ball tee
US3858878 *Jun 1, 1972Jan 7, 1975Tassone Joseph VBaseball and softball type ball tie
US3883138 *Aug 6, 1973May 13, 1975Chorey Andro JBatting tee apparatus
US4279420 *Dec 17, 1979Jul 21, 1981Marvon BayPortable golf practice platform
US5211395 *Sep 25, 1991May 18, 1993Liao Henry HGolf tool
US5520391 *Apr 21, 1995May 28, 1996Brian C. HoweGolf backswing training device
US5645494 *Nov 1, 1994Jul 8, 1997Dionne; Thomas A.Instructional golf mat
US6056651 *Sep 24, 1998May 2, 2000Malinoff; Don W.Golf ball mounting device
US6811499 *Apr 9, 2003Nov 2, 2004Chih-Ching HsienGolf tee structure with adjustable height
US7458906 *Aug 16, 2005Dec 2, 2008Il Hang ChoeFlexible golf tee for driving range
US7815529 *Jan 20, 2009Oct 19, 2010Moldtek Precision Corp.Adjustable golf tee assembly
US7846044Jan 29, 2009Dec 7, 2010Sagadevan Suren FAdjustable golf tee
US20130040761 *Aug 11, 2011Feb 14, 2013Carlo CostantiniGolf tee with level and depth indicators
WO1994006520A1 *Sep 13, 1993Mar 31, 1994Leigh Martin TugwoodA golf tee assembly
WO2001002063A1 *Jun 28, 2000Jan 11, 2001Seguineau XavierMultiple-position tee
WO2012110731A1Feb 10, 2012Aug 23, 2012Jaffre Roland MauriceGolf tee
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/257, 473/398
International ClassificationA63B57/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B57/0018
European ClassificationA63B57/00C