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Publication numberUS3407005 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 22, 1968
Filing dateFeb 13, 1967
Priority dateFeb 13, 1967
Publication numberUS 3407005 A, US 3407005A, US-A-3407005, US3407005 A, US3407005A
InventorsCook David E, Simms Glen E
Original AssigneeConcut Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pavement leveling or grooving machine
US 3407005 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 22, 1968 e. E. SIMMS ET AL 3,407,005

PAVEMENT LEVELING OR GROOVING MACHINE Filed Feb. 15, 1967 4 Sheets-Sheet l GLEN E. SIMMS DHV/DE 0 600K INVENTORS 35/ Heir 102%0/7785/4'.

Q l /0221 MECM fwraw K E Oct. 22, 1968 G. E. SIMMS ET AL 3,407,005

PAVEMENT LEVELING OR GROOVING MACHINE 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb, 13, 1967 GLEN L. 5/4444; Dav/0 E Coax INVENTORS.

N a a w k m f w M m E e n E M 0m, H K m -i u 0 m Oct. 22, 1968 5 $|MM$ ET AL. 3,407,005

PAVEMENT LEVELING OR GROOVING MACHINE Filed Feb. 13, 1967 4 Sheets-Sheet s GLEN E. S/MMS DflV/D E. Coax INVENTORS.

35 Their fitter-nay:

% #0225, M501, Pz/sEELLJ/VEQN Oct. 22, 1968 $|MM$ ET AL 3,407,005

PAVEMENT LEVELING OR GROOVING MACHINE 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Feb. 13, 1967 LEN MMS

6 773617- fizzorweya Mme/s, K/ECM @usssu. KERN United States Patent 3,407,005 PAVEMENT LEVELIN G 0R GROOVING MACHINE Glen E. Simrns, Glendora, and David E. Cook, El Monte,

Calif., assignors to Concut, Inc., El Monte, Calif, a

corporation of California Filed Feb. 13, 1967, Ser. No. 615,491 9 Claims. (Cl. 29939) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This application discloses a machine for leveling and/ or grooving pavement, and particularly concrete pavement, to substantially eliminate bumps therefrom and/or to increase its skid resistance. The machine includes a wheeled frame carrying a transverse rotary cutter which can be locked in position to level the pavement, or which can be permitted to follow the contour of the pavement to groove it Without leveling. Alternative drives are provided to propel the machine at a low speed when leveling or grooving and to propel it at a high speed during transport. The rotary cutter is capable of tilting laterally relative to the rear wheels of the machine to permit the cutter to follow the contour of the pavement in grooving, and is capable of being locked in such a laterally tilted position to provide the pavement with a crown.

Related patents The invention relates to a self-propelled, vehicle-type pavement leveling and/or grooving machine of the type disclosed in Patents Nos. 3,195,957, issued July 20, 1965, Re. 25,838, reissued Aug. 10, 1965, 3,201,173, issued Aug. 17, 1965, 3,208,796, issued Sept. 28, 1965, 3,269,775, issued Aug. 30, 1966, and 3,272,560, issued Sept. 13, 1966, all to Cecil W. Hatcher.

Summary and objects of the invention As background, the invention contemplates a selfpropelled, vehicle-type pavement surfacing machine of the type which includes: frame means having longitudinally spaced front and rear ends; front wheel means connected to and supporting the frame means adjacent the front end thereof; rear wheel means connected to and supporting the frame means adjacent the rear end thereof; rotary surfacing means carried by the frame means between the front and rear wheel means, and rotatable about a transverse axis of rotation, for performing a surfacing operation, e.g., a leveling and/or grooving operation, on pavement over which the machine runs; power means carried by the frame means; means connecting the power means to the rotary surfacing means for driving the rotary surfacing means; and propelling means connecting the power means to at least one of the wheel means for propelling the machine.

A primary object of the invention is to provide a pavement surfacing machine of the foregoing nature wherein the propelling means includes first propelling means conmeeting the power means to one of the wheel means for propelling the machine at a relatively low speed when the rotary surfacing means is in operation, and includes second propelling means connecting the power means to the other of the wheel means for propelling the machine at a relatively high speed when the rotary surfacing means is not in operation. A related object is to provide a machine wherein the first and second propelling means respectively connect the power means to the front and rear wheel means.

ice

With the foregoing construction, the first propelling means drives the front wheel means at a relatively low speed consistent with the capacity of the rotary surfacing means to remove material from the pavement, while the second propelling means drives the rear wheel means at a relatively high speed in maneuvering the machine at a particular site, or during transport from one location to another. The provision of alternative drives for use during surfacing and during maneuvering or transport permits each drive to be designed for optimum efficiency for its particular purpose, which is an important feature.

Another object is to provide a pavement surfacing machine wherein the front wheel means includes tandem front wheels, and wherein the first or low-speed propelling means includes two rotary hydraulic motors driven by the power means and includes means respectively connecting the motors to the front wheels for driving the front wheels at speeds which are low relative to the rotational speeds of the motors.

As additional background, the invention further contemplates a pavement surfacing machine of the type wherein the rotary surfacing means is free to follow the contour of the pavement when grooving the pavement without leveling it, and is locked in position relative to the frame means when leveling the pavement. In this connection, the rotary surfacing means is capable of being inclined or tilted laterally relative to the rear wheel means, being free to seek its own lateral inclination when grooving without leveling. The rotary surfacing means is fixed in a position parallel to the rear wheel means when leveling the pavement, and is fixed at a predetermined lateral angle relative to the rear wheel means when providing the pavement with a crown.

A primary object of the invention in the foregoing connection is to provide an improved means for laterally tilting or inclining the rotary surfacing means relative to the rear wheel means.

More particularly, an important object of the invention is to provide a pavement surfacing machine wherein the rotary surfacing means is nonadjustably mounted on the main frame means and wherein the rear wheel means includes wheeled auxiliary frame means so connected to the main frame means that opposite sides of the main frame means can move vertically relative to the auxiliary frame means independently of each other, whereby to vary the lateral inclination of the rotary surfacing means relative to the rear wheel means.

Still more specifically, an important object is to provide a pavement surfacing machine of the foregoing nature having guide means interconnecting the main frame means and the auxiliary frame means for guiding opposite sides of the main frame means for independent vertical movement relative to the auxiliary frame means. A related object is to provide such a guide means comprising interengageable main and auxiliary guide elements respectively connected to the main frame means and the auxiliary frame means, either the main guide elements or the auxiliary guide elements being pivotally connected to the corresponding frame means for pivotal movement about axes extending longitudinally of the machine. With this construction, the main frame means can tilt laterally relative to the auxiliary frame means to vary the angle of lateral inclination of the rotary surfacing means relative to the rear wheel means.

Another object of the invention is to provide a guide means of the foregoing nature wherein the main and auxiliary guide elements are telescopically interconnected to permit lateral tilting of the main frame means relative to the auxiliary frame means. Additional objects are to provide actuating means interconnecting the main frame means and the auxiliary frame means for independently moving opposite sides of the main frame means vertically relative to the auxiliary frame means so as to laterally tilt the main frame means relative to the auxiliary frame means, and to provide interengageable stop means on the main frame means and the auxiliary frame means for controlling the lateral angle of the rotary surfacing means relative to the rear wheel means.

The foregoing objects, advantages, features and results of the present invention, together with various other objects, advantages, features and results thereof which will be evident to those skilled in the pavement surfacing art in the light of this disclosure, may be achieved with the exemplary embodiments of the invention described in detail hereinafter and illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

Description of the drawings FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a pavement surfacing machine which embodies the invention, the machine being shown in use to groove pavement to increase its skid resistance, without leveling the pavement;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary side elevational view, partially in vertical section, which substantially duplicates a portion of FIG. 1, but which shows in more detail the manner in which the rotary surfacing machine of the invention can groove pavement without leveling it, the irregularity of the pavement profile shown in FIG. 2 being greatly exaggerated for clarity;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2, but showing the rotary surfacing means of the machine of the invention elevated clear of the pavement for maneuvering or transport purposes;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the pavement surfacing machine of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a horizontal sectional view of the pavement surfacing machine of the invention which is taken as indicated by the irregular arrowed line 5-5 of FIG. 1, portions of the machine above this arrowed line being shown in phantom;

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view taken as indicated by the irregular arrowed line 6-6 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a vertical sectional view taken as indicated by the arrowed line 7-7 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 is a vertical sectional view which is taken as indicated by the arrowed line 8-8 of FIG. 1, but which shows the pavement surfacing machine of the invention locked in condition to level the pavement; and

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 8, but showing the pavement surfacing machine of the invention locked in condition to provide the pavement with a crown.

Detailed description of the invention The pavement surfacing machine of the invention, which is designated generally by the numeral 10 in the drawings, incorporates various features of the pavement surfacing machines disclosed and claimed in the aforementioned Hatcher patents. Consequently, the machine 10 will be described only generally herein with respect to such features, restricting this detailed description primarily to the improvements constituting the present invention.

The pavement surfacing machine 10 includes a main frame or frame means 12 having longitudinally spaced front and rear ends respectively supported by front wheel means 14 and rear wheel means 16. Carried by the main frame 12 intermediate the front and rear wheel means 14 and 1-6 is a surfacing means 18 rotatable about a transverse axis. The main frame 12 also carries power means 20, preferably comprising an internal combustion engine 22, for driving the rotary surfacing means 18 and for propelling the machine 10.

As will be described in more detail hereinafter, the engine 22 drives the rotary surfacing means 18 mechanically and drives a hydraulic pump, not specifically shown, for supplying hydraulic fluid under pressure to selectively-operable drives for the front and rear wheel means 1 4 and 16. The hydraulic drive for the front wheel means 14 is a low-speed drive which propels the machine 10' at a low speed when the rotary surfacing means 18 is in operation. Conversely, the hydraulic drive for the rear wheel means 16 is a high speed drive for propelling the machine 10 at a relatively high speed during maneuvering or transport.

Considering the rotary surfacing means 18 in more detail, it is located considerably closer to the rear wheel means 16 than to the front wheel means 14. This minimizes reflections to the rotary surfacing means 18 of bumps encountered by the front wheel means 14 when the machine 10 is in use to level the pavement. The width of the rotary surfacing means 18 exceeds that of the rear wheel means 16 so that the latter runs on the path surfaced by the rotary surfacing means 18. Thus, when the machine 10 is used to level the pavement, bumps therein are reduced ahead of the rear wheel means 16 to minimize the effect thereof on the rotary surfacing means 18.

The rotary surfacing means 18 may be of the type disclosed in the aforementioned Hatcher patents. Briefly, it may include a transverse shaft 24 rotatable in bearings 26, FIG. 7, mounted on the main frame 12. The shaft 24 may have mounted thereon transversely spaced cutting or sawing blades 28 the peripheries of which carry an abrasive material, such as diamond particles or dust. Such blades cut transversely spaced :grooves in the pavement, which grooves are of constant depth when merely grooving the pavement to increase its skid resistance, and are of varying depth when leveling the pavement to remove bumps therefrom.

The engine 22 drives a transverse shaft 30 which is rotatably mounted on the main frame 12 in parallel relation to the cutter shaft 24. The ends of the two shafts 24 and 30 are provided with pulleys around which are trained belts 32 for transmitting rotation of the shaft 30 to the rotary surfacing means 18.

Mounted on the main frame 12 laterally outwardly of the ends of the rotary surfacing means 18 are outrigger wheels 34 the axes of rotation of which are in substantially the same vertical plane as the axis of the cutter shaft 24. The outrigger wheels 34 are carried by brackets 36 secured to the main frame 12 by bolts 38, the latter extending through vertical slots in the brackets to permit adjusting the positions of the brackets relative to the main frame vertically. When the outrigger wheels 34 are lowered into their operative positions, they cause the rotary surfacing means 18 to follow the existing contour of the pavement so that the rotary surfacing means merely grooves the pavement to increase its skid resistance. When the outrigger wheels are elevated into their inoperative positions, the depth of cut of the rotary surfacing means 18 is controlled by the rear wheel means 16 to cause the rotary surfacing means to level the pavement, as will be described in more detail hereinafter.

The front wheel means 14 includes a front truck 40 supported by tandem front wheels 42 and connected to the front end of the main frame 12 by a transverse pivot means 44 intermediate the front wheels. With this arrangement, reflection of bumps encountered by the front wheel means 14 to the rotary surfacing means 18 is further minimized.

The front wheels 42 are rotatably mounted in bifurcated front wheel frames 46 provided with vertical shafts 48 suitably journaled in the front truck 40 for steering purposes. A hydraulic steering cylinder 50 interconnects the front truck 40 and one of the front wheel frames 46 to steer the corresponding front wheel 42. The two front wheel frames 46 are interconnected by a pivoted steering link 52, FIG. 4, so that the steering cylinder 50 steers both front wheels 42 simultaneously.

Considering the rear wheel means 16 in more detail, it includes two laterally spaced rear trucks 54, FIG. 5, each carrying tandem rear wheels 56. A transverse pivot means 58 connects the two rear trucks 54 to an auxiliary frame or subframe 60 to which the rear end of the main frame 12 is connected in a manner to be described. With this construction, the two rear trucks 54 may pivot relative to the subframe 60 independently of each other, about the axis of the pivot means 58, to minimize bump reflections to the rotary surfacing means 18 when the machine is used to level the pavement, as discussed in more detail in the aforementioned Hatcher Patent No. 3,195,957.

As previously indicated, the machine 10 is propelled at a relatively slow speed through thefront wheel means 14 when the rotary surfacing means 18 is in operation, and is propelled at a relatively high speed through the rear wheel means 16 when the rotary surfacing means is not in opjeration. The low speed drive through the front wheel means 14 propels the machine 10 at a speed commensurate with the cutting capacity of the rotary surfacing means 18, and provides a high torque. The high speed drive through the rear wheel means 16 provides for faster maneuvering and/ or transport of the machine when the rotary surfacing means is not in operation.

Considering the low speed drive for the machine 10, each front wheel frame 46 carries a rotary hydraulic motor 62 paralleling the axle 64 of the corresponding front wheel 42. The two motors 62 are driven by the hydraulic fluid supplied by the hereinbefore-mentioned hydraulic pump driven by the engine 22.

Referring to FIGS 1 and 6, each motor 62, through a chain 66, drives a large-diameter sprocket 68 which is rotatable relative to the corresponding front wheel 42 on the corresponding axle 64. Each sprocket 68 has connected thereto a small-diameter sprocket which, through a chain 70, drives a sprocket 72 on a shaft 74 carried by the corresponding front wheel frame 46 and paralleling the corresponding axle 64. Incorporated in the shaft 74 is a clutch 76, FIG. 6, for disengaging the drive to the corresponding front wheel 42. The clutch 76 drives a small-diameter sprocket which, through a chain 78, FIG. 6, drives a large-diameter sprocket connected to the corresponding, front wheel 42 in coaxial relation with the corresponding axle 64.

The over-all effect of the foregoing drive train between each rotary hydraulic motor 62 and the corresponding front wheel 42 is to rotate the front wheel at an extremely slow speed compared to .the rotational speed of the motor, but with a very high torque. Thus, the front wheels 42 propel the machine 10 at a very slow speed commensurate with the capacity of the rotary surfacing means 18. The front wheel drive preferably is operative in the forward direction of travel of the machine 10 only since the rotary surfacing means 18 is not operated during rearward travel of the machine. The clutches 76 are preferably remotely controllable from the operators station 80, FIG. 1, as are the various other operator-controlled components of the machine.

As best shown in FIGS. 1 and S, the rear trucks 54 carry reversible rotary hydraulic motors 82 connected through chains 84 to the rearmost rear wheels 56 on the respective trucks. It will be noted that the relative diameters of the sprockets around which the chains 84 are trained are such as to provide relatively little speed reduction. Consequently, when the front drive is de-energized and the rear drive is energized, the rotary hydraulic motors 82 propel the machine 10, either forwardly or rearwardly, at relatively high speeds for maneuvering the machine and for transporting it from one location to another.

The foregoing provision of alternate drives for use during surfacing operations and during maneuvering or transport permits each drive to be designed for optimum etficiency for its particular purpose. In other words, the low-speed front wheel-drive can be designed to propel the machine forwardly at a very low speed consistent with the capacity of the rotary surfacing means 18. The rear drive can be designed to achieve a desirably high maneuvering or transport speed. In neither case does either drive act as a limiting factor on the other, which is an important feature of the invention.

The pavement surfacing machine 10 includes guide means interconnecting the rear end of the main frame 12 and the auxiliary frame or subframe 60 for guiding opposite sides of the main frame for independent vertical movement relative to the subframe so as to permit lateral tilting of the rotary surfacing means 18 relative to the rear wheel means 16. As best shown in FIGS. 1, 8 and 9, this guide means includes four upright guide rods 86 arranged in a rectangular pattern and having their lower ends connected to the subframe 60 by'pivots 88 the axes of which extend longitudinally of the machine. The guide rods 86, which are sometimes referred to herein as auxiliary guide elements, project upwardly through and are generally vertically slidable in upright guide sleeves 90 rigidly secured to the main frame 12, these guide sleeves occasionally being referred to as main guide elements. As will be apparent, guide rods 86 may pivot relative to the subframe 60 to permit the entire main frame 12 to tilt laterally relative to the subframe, thereby permitting lateral tilting of the rotary surfacing means '18 relative to the rear wheel means 16, as exaggerately shown in FIG. 9 of the drawings. The purpose of such variations in the lateral angle of inclination of the rotary surfacing means 18 relative to the rear wheel means 16 will be discussed hereinafter in considering the over-all operation of the machine 10.

The pavement surfacing machine 10 includes actuating means for elevating the main frame 12 relative to the subframe 60 in order to lift the rotary surfacing means 18 clear of the pavement, as shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings. This actuating means includes two hydraulic cylinders or rams 92 connected at their lower ends to the subframe 60 by longitudinally extending pivots 94 and connected at their upper ends to the main frame 12 by laterally extending pivots 96. As will be apparent, the two lifting cylinders 92 can lift opposite sides of the main frame 12 independently of each other.

The depth of cut of and/or the lateral inclination of the rotary surfacing means 18 may be fixed by laterally spaced, vertically adjustable stops 98 on the main frame 12 which are engageable with laterally spaced stops 100 on the subframe 60. The stops 98 and are located in the vertical plane containing the axis of the rear-truck pivot means 58, the guide rods 86 being symmetrically located relative to such plane.

Over-all operation of the invention As hereinbefore discussed in more detail, when the rotary surfacing means 18 is in operation, the low-speed front-wheel drive is used to propel the pavement surfacing machine 10 forwardly at a relatively low speed commensurate with the cutting capacity of the rotary surfacing means. On the other hand, when the machine 10 is being manuevered, or moved from one location to another, with the rotary surfacing means 18 lifted clear of the pavement, the high-speed rear-wheel drive is used to obtain relatively high maneuvering or road speeds. Thus, the selectively-operable drives of the invention permit operation of the machine 10 with maximum effectiveness.

If it is desired to operate the rotary surfacing means 18 for the purpose of forming anti-skid grooves only, and without leveling the pavement, the outrigger wheels 34 are set in their operative positions, wherein they engage the pavement and control the depth of cut of the rotary surfacing means. Under such conditions, the stops 98 are set in positions such that they will not engage the stops 100, as shown, for example, in FIGS. 1 to 3 of the drawings. Under these conditions, the rotary surfacing means 18 is controlled solely by the outrigger wheels 34, and the main frame 12 may move upwardly and downwardly relative to and/or may tilt laterally relative to the rear wheel means 16 as required to enable the rotary surfacing means to follow the existing contour. (It will be understood that the lifting cylinders 92 are de-energized under such conditions.) Consequently, the rotary surfacing means 18 merely cuts anti-skid grooves of substantially constant depths in the pavement, despite substantial irregularities in the pavement, as suggested to an exaggerated extent in FIG. 2 f the drawings. It will be understood that the guide rods 86 may pivot freely in the lateral direction relative to the subframe 60 so that all four of the rear wheels 56 remain in contact with the pavement as the rotary surfacing means 18 is tilted laterally in either direction and/ or moves upwardly or downwardly in following the existing contour.

If it is desired to level the pavement, the outrigger wheels 34 are locked in their elevated, inoperative positions, or are removed. The stops 98 are adjusted to limit the depth of cut of the rotary surfacing means 18 to the desired value upon engagement thereof with the stops 100, as shown in FIG. 8 of the drawings. (In this figure, the stops 98 are shown as so adjusted as to maintain the rotary surfacing means 18 laterally parallel to the rear wheel means 16.) Under these conditions, the pavement surfacing machine 10 levels the pavement by removing any bumps therefrom. The effectiveness of the rotary surfacing means in removing bumps is enhanced by minimizing the reflection of bumps thereto from the front and rear wheel means 14 and 16, bump reflections being minimized by the location of the rotary surfacing means close to the rear wheel means, the pivoting of the front truck 40 intermediate the front wheels 42, the independent pivoting of the rear trucks 54 intermediate the rear wheels 56 thereon, the fact that the rear wheels 56 run on the path leveled by the rotary surfacing means, and the like.

If it is desired to provide the pavement with a crown, i.e., a lateral slope, the stops 98 are so adjusted as to tilt the main frame 12 laterally relative to the subframe 60, as shown to an exaggerated extent in FIG. 9 of the drawings. Thus, when the rear wheels 56 are in contact with level pavement, the rotary surfacing means 18 will cut the pavement at an angle, as indicated by the dotted line 102. After this laterally sloping cut has progressed forwardly sufficiently far for the rear wheels 56 to run thereon, it is then necessary to re-set the stops 98 to restore the rotary surfacing means 18 to parallelism with the rear wheel means 16. Thereafter, as the machine 10 continues to move forwardly, the desired laterally sloping cut will be maintained.

Whenever it is desired to elevate the rotary surfacing means 18 clear of the pavement for the purpose of maneuvering the machine 10, or for the purpose of moving it to another location, this may be accomplished readily by energizing the lifting cylinders 92. This condition is shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings.

An important feature of the guide means between the main frame 12 and the subframe 60 which is composed of the guide rods 86 and the guide sleeves 90 is that it provides a positive and stable connection which nevertheless permits the main frame 12 to tilt laterally relative to the subframe 60 whenever such tilting is necessary or desired.

Although exemplary embodiments of the invention have been disclosed herein for purposes of illustration, it will be understood that various changes, modifications and substitutions may be incorporated in such embodiments without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined by the claims which follow.

We claim as our invention:

1. In a pavement surfacing machine, the combination of:

(a) frame means having longitudinally spaced front and rear ends;

(b) front wheel means connected to and supporting said frame means adjacent said front end thereof; of;

(c) rear wheel means connected to and supporting said frame means adjacent said front end thereof;

(d) rotary surfacing means carried by said frame means between said front and rear wheel means, and

8 rotatable above a tranverse axis, for surfacing pavement over which the machine runs;

(e) power means carried by said frame means;

(f) means connecting said power means to said rotary surfacing means for driving said rotary surfacing means;

(g) first propelling means connecting said power means to one of said wheel means for propelling the machine at a relatively low speed; and

(h) second propelling means connecting said power means to the other of said Wheel means for propelling the machine at a relatively high speed.

2. A pavement surfacing machine as defined in claim 1 wherein said first and second propelling means respectively connect said power means to said front and rear wheel means.

3. A pavement surfacing machine according to claim 2 wherein:

(a) said front wheel means includes at least one front wheel; and

(b) said first propelling means includes a rotary hydraulic motor driven by said power means and includes means connecting said motor to said front wheel for driving said front wheel at a speed which 18 low as compared to the rotational speed of said motor.

4. A pavement surfacing machine as set forth in claim 2 wherein:

(a) said front wheel means includes tandem front wheels; and

(b) said first propelling means includes two rotary hydraulic motors driven by said power means and includes means respectively connecting said motors to said front Wheels for driving said front wheels at speeds which are low relative to the rotational speeds of said motors.

f5. In a pavement surfacing machine, the combination 0 (a) main frame means having longitudinally spaced front and rear ends;

(b) front wheel means connected to and supporting safid main frame means adjacent said front end there- 0 i (c) rotary surfacing means carried by said main frame means rearwardly of said front wheel means, and rotatable about a transverse axis, for surfacing pavement over which the machine runs;

(d) rear wheel means rearwardly of said rotary surfacing means for supporting said main frame means adjacent said rear end thereof;

(e) said rear wheel means including wheeled auxiliary frame means;

(f) guide means interconnecting said main frame means said said auxiliary frame means for guiding opposite sides of said main frame means for independent vertical movement relative to said auxiliary frame means;

(g) said guide means comprising interengageable main and auxiliary guide elements respectively connected to said main frame means and said auxiliary frame means;

(h) said guide elements which are connected to one of said frame means being pivotally connected thereto for movement about axes extending longitudinally of said main frame means; and

(i) means connected to said rotary surfacing means and at least one of said wheel means for driving said rotary surfacing means and for propelling the machine.

6. A pavement surfacing machine as defined in claim 5 wherein said main and auxiliary guide elements are telescopically interconnected.

7. A pavement surfacing machine according to claim 6 wherein said auxiliary guide elements are pivotally connected to said auxiliary frame means for movement about axes extending longitudinally of said main frame means.

8. A pavement surfacing machine as defined in claim 5 including actuating means interconnecting said main frame means and said auxiliary frame means for independently moving opposite sides of said main frame means vertically relative to said auxiliary frame means.

9. A pavement surfacing machine as set forth in claim 8 wherein said actuating means comprises rams pivotally main frame means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Blood et a]. 29941 Davis et a1 29939 X Lenker 29939 Hatchet 29939 ERNEST R. PURSER, Primary Examiner.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PATENT OFFICE Washington, 0.6. 20231 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,407,005 October 22, 1968 Glen E. Simms et al.

It is certified that error appears in the above identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 5, line 12, "op eration" should read operation Column 7, line 71, cancel "of;"; line 73, "front end" should read rear end Column 8, line 53, after "means insert and line 54,

cancel "said", second occurrence.

Signed and sealed this 10th day of March 1970.

(SEAL) Attest:

WILLIAM E. SCHUYLER, JR.

Commissioner of Patents Edward M. Fletcher, Jr.

Attesting Officer

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3598446 *Jun 11, 1969Aug 10, 1971Concut IncPavement surfacing machine with vacuum water recovery system
US3608968 *Apr 3, 1969Sep 28, 1971Christensen Diamond Prod CoPavement cutting and water and cutting pickup apparatus
US3663061 *Nov 2, 1970May 16, 1972Super CutPavement grooving machine with hydraulic winch
US3694033 *Nov 9, 1970Sep 26, 1972Christensen Diamond Prod CoRoadway paint stripe grooving machine
US3697135 *Feb 25, 1971Oct 10, 1972Warner GeneConcrete pavement cutting machine
US3700849 *Feb 16, 1970Oct 24, 1972Edward A ZuzeloMultiple grooving of pavement
US3796462 *Sep 15, 1972Mar 12, 1974Cardinal Ind IncMachinery for multiple grooving of pavement
US4139318 *Mar 31, 1976Feb 13, 1979Cmi CorporationMethod and apparatus for planing a paved roadway
US4333685 *Jun 9, 1980Jun 8, 1982Federal-Mogul CorporationRoad surfacing apparatus
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US4407605 *Jun 12, 1981Oct 4, 1983Reinhard WirtgenMethod and apparatus for repairing longitudinal seams or cracks in road surfaces
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Classifications
U.S. Classification299/39.6, 173/24
International ClassificationE01C23/088, E01C23/00
Cooperative ClassificationE01C23/088
European ClassificationE01C23/088