Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3407509 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1968
Filing dateOct 21, 1965
Priority dateOct 21, 1965
Publication numberUS 3407509 A, US 3407509A, US-A-3407509, US3407509 A, US3407509A
InventorsMartinez Jose S
Original AssigneeJose S. Martinez
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vertical locating tool
US 3407509 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1953 .1. s. MARTINEZ 3,

VERTICAL LOCATING TOOL Filed Oct. 21, 1965 i 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 a Q mvsw'roa.

I5 63 ,5 JOSE S. MART/NE Z 7 63- 0 e :I7 6/ BY 777% C 13 /9- ATTORNEY Oct. 29, 1968 J. s. MARTINEZ VERTICAL LOCATING TOOL 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 21, 1965 .JOSES 61a. 2

m m n m M f m United States Patent Ofice 3,407,509 Patented Oct. 29, 1968 3,407,509 VERTICAL LOCATING TOOL Jose S. Martinez, 2450 Hampton Ave., Redwood City, Calif. 94061 Filed Oct. 21, 1965, Ser. No. 499,795 2 Claims. (Cl. 33207) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A tool to locate a point on a ceiling vertically above a fixed point on a fioor employs a support which engages or has incorporated therein a level so that the support may be held vertical. Slidable in the support parallel thereto are a tension bar and a marker bar. The tension bar is spring biased upward relative to the support and has a roller on the top so that the bar can be moved across the ceiling and holds the support in position once it is vertical. The marker bar has a marker aligned with a floor locator so that a mark is placed on the ceiling directly above the floor locator.

The present invention relates to a new and improved tool for use in building construction to locate a point on a ceiling vertically above a fixed point on a floor. Heretofore, a plumb 'bo'b has been used for such purpose. The present invention estimates the inconvenience and inaccuracy of such use.

A primary feature of the present invention is that it permits a workman to quickly and easily locate a point on the ceiling vertically above any designated point on the floor. Locating a vertical point of this type is necessary in erecting partitions, wallboard, walls, window frames, door jambs, etc., in buildings of all types.

Another feature of the present device is that the operator of the device need never climb a ladder to locate a vertical point on the ceiling. In one form, the present device consists of a combination of a standard carpenters level and a spring loaded vertical bar. When the foot of the vertical 'bar is placed on a fixed point on the floor, the vertical is determined by means of the level bubble. A marking bar is then slid upward to mark the vertical point on the ceiling. In another form of the invention the present vertical locating tool incorporates a level bubble in its construction and does not require use of a separate level.

Other objects of the present invention will become apparent upon reading the following specification and referring to the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a front plan view of a vertical locating tool assembly constructed in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a side plan view of a vertical locating tool shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 33 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a partial sectional view taken substantially along the line 44 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a front plan view of a modification.

FIG. 6 is a side view of the modification shown in FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 77 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a partial sectional view taken substantially along the line 8-8 of FIG. 6.

In many stages in building construction and renovation it is necessary to locate a point on a ceiling directly vertically above a marked point on a floor. The present device accomplishes this both easily and quickly. Vertical locating tool 11 is used in conjunction with standard carpenters level 13. Optionally angle iron 15 may be attached to the extreme lower portion of level 13, so that horizontal foot 17 of angle iron 15 is aligned with the flat bottom surface 19 of level 13. Angle 15 may be used as a pedal to steady the tool and is also used to line up the tool with the mark on the floor. Vertical locating tool 11 is composed of three main portions: support channel 21, tension bar 23, and marking bar 25.

Supporting channel 21 is formed in the shape of a wide mouth U with side walls 27 and 28 and web 29. Carpenters level 13 fits within the channel and is held by thumb screws 27a which threadedly engage side 27 of channel 21 to bear against one side edge of carpenters level 13. Channel portion 31 is integrally formed with or aflixed to web 29 of channel 21 and is vertically dis posed. Side walls 32 of channel 31 extend outwardly in a direction opposite from walls 27, 28 of channel 21. Channel 31 extends from approximately the upper quarter length of support channel 21 above the upper surface of channel 21 to a height depending on the approximate ceiling to floor distance in which the tool is to be utilized. Formed along the inner walls of channel 31 are grooves 33 which are of a size sufiicient to permit the insertion of tension bar 23 therein, as shown in FIG. 3. Bar 23 is T-shaped in cross-section, although such shape is subject to modification. Tension bar 23 slides vertically upward and downward in grooves 33 in channel 31. Spring 35 is affixed at point 37 to the lower end of tension bar 23 and aflixed at its opposite upper end at point 39 on the upper end of channel 31. Thus spring 35 provides spring tension forcing tension bar 23 vertically upward. Afiixed at the extreme upper end of bar 23 is ball hearing assembly 41 in which is rotatively fixed ball bearing 43. Ball bearing 43 bears against the surface of ceiling 45 and permits locating tool 11 to be moved along the ceiling to find the vertical. During such movement, bar 23 damps swinging movement. Formed in the inner surface of side 30 of supporting channel 21 is groove 47 Formed in the inner walls of groove 47 are smaller grooves 49 which permit the insertion of marking bar 25 therein. Marking bar 25 is T-shaped in cross-section When so inserted bar 25 is free to slide vertically upward and downward within grooves 49, as shown in FIG. 3. Fixed at the extreme upper end of marking bar 25 is marking pen holder 51 consisting of set screw 53 and pressure plate 55 which hold in place marking pen or other marking device 57. Marking pen -57 is adjusted so as to extend a slight distance above the upper extremity of marking bar 25, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 herein.

In operation, the vertical locating tool is operated as follows: The operator marks on floor 61 a point 63, vertically above which a corresponding point must be located on ceiling 45. The position of point 63 is determined by construction drawings or measurement. The operator takes vertical locating tool '11, to which is clamped standard carpenters level 13, and places angle iron 15 such that its right angle apex point coincides with point 63 on floor 61, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. To steady the tool the operator places his foot on horizontal foot 17 of angle iron 15. Tension bar 23 is then permitted to slide upwardly until ball 43 engages ceiling 45 and is biased against ceiling 45 by means of spring 35. The operator then views the bubble in level 65 on carpenters level 13 and adjusts the vertical position of the tool 11 until the bubble is centered, indicating that the level is disposed exactly vertically. In so adjusting tool 11, ball bearing 43 rolling on ceiling 45 permits the tool '11 to be easily and quickly adjusted to a vertical position, as indicated by level 65. During the adjusting process, both angle foot 17 and bottom 19 of level 13 remain flat on floor 61, while ball bearing 43 engages ceiling 45, thus permitting the device to be under tension between floor and ceiling at all times 3 during adjustment. When the tool 11 is in the vertical position as indicated by level 65, the operator slides marking bar 25 upwardly until marking pen 57 touches ceiling 45 at point 67 and makes a mark thereon by a slight swinging movement of the tool. Marking bar 25 is then slid downwardly and tool 11 is removed. The mark made at point 67 on ceiling 45 is directly vertically above mark 63 on the floor 61, thus accomplishing the desired result quickly and easily without the operator leaving the floor.

A modification in which numerals describing similar structures are denominated by the addition of the letter a is shown in FIGS. 5 through 8. In the modification shown, tool 11a is manufactured as a specially constructed tool complete in itself, rather than designed to be afiixed to an existing carpenters level as heretofore described.

Support channel 71 is generally U-shaped in crosssection as shown in FIG. 7, with inwardly extending shoulders 73 formed with grooves 75 therein. Formed at the outwardly-facing ends of channel 71 are flanges 77. Channel 79 is identical to channel 71 in cross-sectional configuration, having inner shoulders 81, inner grooves 83, and outwardly-facing flanges 85. Channels 71 and 79 are joined back-to-back by a series of rivets or other fasteners 87. Channel 71 is of a substantial height being approximately two-thirds the distance from ceiling 45a to floor 61a. Channel 79 extends vertically approximately onethird the length of channel 71, being flush with the upper end of channel 71, as shown in FIG. 6. Angle iron 15a is attached to the lower extremity of channel 71 substantially as previously described with horizontal flange 17a being flush with bottom edge 87 of channel 71. Afiixed approximately at the midpoint of channel 71 are bubble levels 65a, 65b which are placed on channel 71 so that the bubble is centered on a crosshairs when channel 71 is in exactly vertical position. Tension bar 23a is T-shaped in cross-section with the arms of the T sliding within grooves 83 in channel 79, as shown in FIG. 7. Spring 35a is afiixed between pin 39a in the upper end of support channel 79 and hole 37a in the lower portion of tension bar 23a to upwardly bias tension bar 230. Ball bearing 43a and support assembly 41a are substantially as described previously. Marker bar 25a is T-shaped in crosssection and slides within grooves 75 in support channel 71, as previously described, with bars 23a and 25a being aligned as shown in FIG. 7. Marking pen 57a and support assembly 51a are afiixed to the upper end of marker bar 25a. A marking pointer 91 with downwardly converging points is afiixed within channel 71 so as to have the longitudinal axis of the pointer along a line common with the point of marking pen 57a.

Stop 93 is atfixed between shoulders 75 of channel 71 above level 65a so as to prevent marker bar 25a from sliding downwardly to damage bubble 65a.

In operation, this modification of the vertical locating tool is operated as follows: After point 63a is located on fioor 61a, the operator placespointer 91 of tool 11a on point 63a. Tension bar 23a is released from its stop to bear upward against ceiling 450 while the tool is being positioned. The operator views the bubble in level 65a and centers it to vertically align the tool, as heretofore described. When the bubble is centered and the tool is in vertical position the operator slides marking bar 25a upwardly until marking pen 57a makes a mark at point 67a on ceiling 45a. The tool is then removed. The mark at point 67a is then exactly vertically above the previous mark at point 63a on floor 61a.

What is claimed is:

1. A vertical locating too'l comprising a support means, level means to visually indicate when said support means is vertical, a tension bar slidable in said support means parallel to said support means, a spring connected between said tension bar and said support means biasing said tension bar upward relative to said support means, a roller on the upper end of said tension bar whereby said roller may bear against a ceiling and be moved along the ceiling until said support means and tension bar are in vertical position, a marker bar slidable in said support means, a marker, holder means on the upper end of said marker bar to hold said marker in position on said upper end, floor locating means associated with said support means to locate said support means relative to a mark on the floor, said level means comprising a conventional carpenters level having a bubble level contained within an elongated casing, said support means comprising an elongated channel, said carpenters level fitting within said channel, and holding means to hold said level firmly within said channel, said floor locating means being aligned with said marker so that said marker will mark a point on a ceiling vertically above a point on a floor when said floor locating means coincides with said point on said floor and said bubble level indicates the vertical, said support means comprising a first set of grooves formed in said channel, said tension bar sliding within said first grooves and a second set of grooves formed on said channel, said marker bar sliding within said second grooves.

2. A vertical locating tool comprising a support means, level means to visually indicate when in a position whereby said support means is aligned in position parallel to said level means, a tension bar slidable in said support means parallel to said support means, a spring connected between said tension bar and said support means biasing said tension bar upward relative to said support means, a roller on the upper end of said tension bar whereby said roller may bear against a ceiling and be moved along the ceiling until said support means and tension bar are in vertical position, a marker bar slidable in said support means, a marker, holder means on the upper end of said marker bar to hold said marker in position on said upper end, floor locating means associated with said support means to locate said support means relative to a mark on the floor, said support means comprising an elongated first channel and an elongated second channel, said channels afiixed back to back, a first set of grooves formed in said first channel to slidably receive said tension bar, and a second set of grooves formed in said second channel to slidably receive said marker bar, said floor locating means being atiixed at the lower extremity of said second channel, said level means comprising a bubble level afiixed to one of said channels, said floor locating means being aligned with said marker so that the marker will mark a point on a ceiling vertically above a point on a floor when said locating means is aligned with said point on said floor and said bubble level indicates the vertical.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 160,471 3/1875 Robinson 3316l 1,614,577 1/1927 Tetrick 33161 1,620,469 3/ 1927 Kirkhofi 33-2 11 2,245,646 6/1941 Bullivant 33-88 3,277,579 10/1966 Murphy 33--208 LEONARD FORMAN, Primary Examiner.

L. ANDERSON, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US160471 *Dec 17, 1874Mar 2, 1875 Improvement in stair-builders rules
US1614577 *Mar 16, 1925Jan 18, 1927Tetrick Claude SCombination spacer story pole
US1620469 *Sep 12, 1925Mar 8, 1927Kirkhoff Samuel RClamp
US2245646 *Jun 30, 1939Jun 17, 1941Bullivant Lingham JExtension plumb rod
US3277579 *Jan 13, 1964Oct 11, 1966Murphy Gerald ETelescopic vertical level
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4864732 *Jan 19, 1988Sep 12, 1989Fatigue Technology, Inc.Combined hole size gauge and oversized hole marker
US5414942 *Feb 14, 1994May 16, 1995L. J. Smith, Inc.Apparatus and method for measuring baluster lengths and replicAting baluster layout from a base surface to a handrail
US5617757 *Jan 26, 1995Apr 8, 1997Horner Creative Products, Inc.Liquid level monitoring systems for underground storage tanks and method for its installation
US5653036 *Nov 24, 1995Aug 5, 1997Dansereau; Mark D.Drop finder
US6205670 *Aug 6, 1999Mar 27, 2001James WebbBore centering device
US6925725 *Sep 11, 2003Aug 9, 2005Claas Fertigungstechnik GmbhMethod of and device for determination of penetration depth
US7497022 *Mar 31, 2007Mar 3, 2009James Arthur AarhusPlate level
US8826554 *Mar 29, 2011Sep 9, 2014Ronald BariteauCustom baluster level
US8943704 *Mar 15, 2013Feb 3, 2015William Lee ScammelApparatus for locating fixture boxes and the like
US20040055173 *Sep 11, 2003Mar 25, 2004Guenter HerrmannMethod of and device for determination of penetration depth
US20120246911 *Mar 29, 2011Oct 4, 2012Ronald BariteauCustom Baluster Level
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/666, 33/520, 33/379
International ClassificationG01C9/24, G01C9/18, B25H7/00, B25H7/04
Cooperative ClassificationB25H7/04, G01C9/24
European ClassificationB25H7/04, G01C9/24