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Publication numberUS3407567 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1968
Filing dateMar 22, 1966
Priority dateMar 22, 1966
Also published asDE1586218A1
Publication numberUS 3407567 A, US 3407567A, US-A-3407567, US3407567 A, US3407567A
InventorsHudson Doyle R
Original AssigneeOlinkraft Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag opening apparatus
US 3407567 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 29, 1968 o. R. HUDSON BAG OPENING APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Sheet l Fileql March 22, 1966 INVENTOR. DOYLE R HUDSON ATTORNEY Oct. 29, 1968 o. R. HUDSON BAG OPENING APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 22, 1966 INVENTOR.

DOYLE R. HUDSON ATTORNEY United States Patent O 3,407,567 BAG OPENING APPARATUS Doyle R. Hudson, West Monroe, La., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Olinkraft, Inc., West Monroe, La., a corporation of Delaware Filed Mar. 22, 1966, Ser. No. 536,469 Claims. (Cl. 53385) ABSTRACT OF THE DISKJLOSURE The disclosure relates to an improved machine for opening bags so that articles may be inserted therein, with the machine comprising a receptacle for holding bags in a closed, stacked relationship, suction means for successively ejecting and partially opening bags from said receptacle, and a blower for directing a stream of air into each partially opened, successively ejected bag, thereby completely opening said bag.

The present invention relates to a machine for opening bags so that articles may be inserted therein.

In the past a number of machines have been marketed which use a variety of mechanisms to cause one bag of a stack of bags to be opened and distended and thus provide for the ready insertion of articles by hand.

Ordinarily, these mechanisms include a plurality of interacting means for removing the bag from a stack of bags and getting the bag into the distended condition.

It is a disadvantage of mechanisms known heretofore that they generally require a plurality of often complicated mechanical means to perform this simple function. In fact, a testament to the uneconomical manner of operation of many machines of this type is that it is frequently more economical to open bags by hand.

It is, accordingly, a principal object of the present invention to provide an improved bag opening apparatus.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide an improved and simplified apparatus for removing bags from a stack of bags and opening the bags, thus providing for the ready insertion of articles either by hand or automatically.

Other objects and features of the present invention will be apparent when the following discussion is considered in connection with the appended drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view partly in section, with portions cut away, of a bag opening apparatus in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURES 2 through 4 are side elevational views similar to FIGURE 1 showing the bag apparatus of the present invention in subsequent stages of operation;

FIGURE 5 is a front elevational view of a bag being held in the closed and stacked position.

Referring now to the drawings and particularly to FIG- URE 1 there is shown a plurality of bags 20, preferably square bottomed bags such as shown in FIGURE 5 and in US. Patent 3,206,105. The bags are preferably provided with a thumb notch 21 on one side only midway on the upper, leading edge thereof.

The bags are held in closed, stacked relationship in receptacle or hopper 30. Receptacle 30 is a generally rectangular enclosure having a base 31 and upstanding side walls 32. The receptacle 30 preferably has an open entry side 33 and an open exit side 34. The base 31 of the receptacle 30 is preferably inclined towards exit side 34 to aid in discharge of the bags 20. The shape and form of the receptacle is not particularly critical, it being only necessary to provide for convenient bag storage and ready access to the bags.

The bags are stacked in receptacle 30 with notch 21 facing exit side 34 and the folded base 22 facing entry side 33.

3,407,567 Patented Oct. 29, 1968 ice The plurality of bags 20 are preferably urged forward by means of a spring, not shown, or any other convenient means. The bags are prevented from leaving the receptacle 30 by means of holding pins or fingers 35 on the bottom of exit side 34 and flange or roller 36 on the top of exit side 34. Flange or roller 36 preferably holds only the rear portion of bag 20 through thumb notch 21 as shown in FIGURE 5.

Optionally, additional holding pins (not shown) may be provided part way up side wall 32 to relieve the pressure on the forwardmost bag of the stack and prevent the bags from being prematurely ejected. In this manner all of the bags in the stack do not exert pressure on the forwardmost bag. If desired, the additional holding pins may be actuated by the ejection mechanism hereinafter discussed so that as a bag is ejected from the receptacle the additional holding pins release a bag into the forward portion of the receptacle.

Arranged adjacent the exit side 34 of receptacle 30 are a plurality of suction devices 40 and 41. While the apparatus as described preferably includes two sets of suetion devices, 40 and 41, variations in this are contemplated and for example a single suction device or a single set of suction devices or three or more sets of suction devices may be employed.

Suction devices 40 and 41 are provided operative to engage and grip the leading bag in an area above the folded bottom thereof. The suction devices 40 and 41 are reciprocally movable in a generally horizontal plane into and out of engagement with the bags 20. By generally horizontal plane the present invention contemplates movement of the suction devices, if desired, in for example an are or similar movement depending on various considerations, such as location of the receptacle.

The suction devices 40 and 41 may be mounted in any desired manner to provide for the appropriate reciprocal movement. For example, as shown in the drawings the suction devices may be mounted on plate 42 which in turn is activated by piston 43 and piston arm 44 driven by hose 45 connected to a hydraulic or air cylinder, not shown. The particular means for activating plate 42 and suction devices 40 and 41 are not particularly critical and a variety of means may be selected. The piston 43 is mounted on housing 46 by means of bolts 47 and clamps 48. Support bar 49 is mounted on housing 46 by means of bolts 50 and clamps 51. Support bar 49 is mounted on plate 42 by any desired means and moves in an appropriate reciprocal motion. A plurality of support bars may be used, if desired, or the support bars may be mounted in a stationary manner. if desired.

In operation the suction devices 40 and 41 are urged forward into engagement with the upper portion of bags 20. The suction means is provided by suction hoses 52 and suction is applied in sufficient force to pull the top portion of one bag only out of receptacle 30 by forcing the top portion of bag 20 over flange 36. In operation, flange 36 holds only the rear portion of bag 20 through thumb notch 21. Therefore, the front top portion of bag 20 is readily moved by the suction devices and the bag 20 is simply and conveniently partially opened by the action of the suction devices 40 and 41 alone. As the suction devices 40 and 41 continue their rearward motion they pull the rear portion of partially opened bag 20 in a substantially horizontal direction over flange 36. Subsequently, the bottom portion of bag 20 is forced free from holding pins 35 and the partially opened bag is urged in the direction of the moving suction devices 40 and 41. Alternatively, one may provide fingers (not shown) instead of suction devices 40 and 41 to grasp the front portion of bag 20 through thumb notch 21 and thus perform basically the same function as the suction devices 40 and 41.

The horizontal movement of the suction devices is a particular advantage in that it avoids the necessity for an additional device to turn the bags into delivery position.

Blower 60 having a discharge nozzle 61 is mounted above the exit side 34 of receptacle 30. The blower is of the usual form with the air stream provided by motor 62 of the usual construction. Moveable gate 63 is mounted at the end of discharge nozzle 61 completely blocking discharge nozzle 61 so that the escape of air from discharge nozzle 61 is prevented. Gate 63 swings on pivot 64 and arm 65 with a spring 66 mounted on housing 67. The gate arm 65 and pivot 64 may be on both sides of the discharge nozzle 61 or on one side only. The gate is actuated by cam 68 having cam arm 69 mounted on plate 42. As plate 42 and suction devices 40 and 41 move in their substantially horizontal movement away from receptacle 30, as shown in FIGURES 2-4, cam 68 hooks onto roller 70 which is mounted on pivot arm 65. The cam 68 opens gate 63 and allows a blast of air from discharge nozzle 61 to move into the partially open bag 20 as it is being pulled by suction devices 40 and 41 away from receptacle 30, thus fully opening bag 20. As the cam 68 moves rearwardly, it releases gate 63 and spring 66 urges the gate 63 back to its closed position. The cam 68, cam arm 69 and roller 70 may also be on either one side of discharge nozzle 61 or both sides.

When suction devices 40 and 41 arrive in their rearward position, the suction is removed and the bag is allowed to drop into conveyor 80 which may carry conveyor cup 81.

As cam 68 returns to the position in FIGURE 1 from the position in FIGURE 4 it may pass roller 70 without opening gate 63 by a variety of means. For example, the rear face of cam 68 may be tapered and the cam may be spring mounted to depress on passing roller 70. Alternatively, the roller may be moveable in one direction.

It is a particular advantage of the present invention that the suction devices 40 and 41 effectively partially open bag 20 and the blower 60 completes the opening in a simple and convenient manner. Thus, in operation the apparatus of the present invention simply and conveniently serially removes bags from a hopper and deposits them in the fully opened condition in one simple and expeditious movement with a minimum of complicated moving parts.

A highly advantageous feature of the present invention is the cooperation between the suction devices 40 and 41 and the blower 60 to insure complete and convenient opening of the bag.

This invention may be embodied in other forms or carried out in other ways without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof. The present embodiment is therefore to be considered as in all respects illustrative and not restrictive, the scope of the invention being indicated by the appended claims, and all changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency are intended to be embraced therein.

What is claimed is:

1. A bag opening apparatus comprising:

(A) a receptacle for holding bags in a closed, stacked relationship, said receptacle having a bottom, upstanding sides, an entry side and an exit side;

(B) suction means arranged adjacent said exit side reciprocally moveable in a generally horizontal plane into and out of engagement with the upper portion of said bags, said suction means being operable to suecessively eject and partially open bags from said receptacle;

(C) a blower having a discharge nozzle above the exit side of said receptacle directing a stream of air into each partially opened, successively ejected bag, thereby completely opening said bag;

(D) gate means associated with said blower, said gate means in its closed position preventing the flow of air into the area adjacent said exit side, said gate means in its open position permitting the flow of air into said exit side; and

(E) means associated with said suction means for moving said gate means into the open and closed position.

2. An apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said gate means is a moveable gate attached to said discharge nozzle.

3. An apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said receptacle has an open entry side and an open exit side.

4. An apparatus according to claim 3 including a holding pin on the exit side of said receptacle.

5. An apparatus according to claim 1 including a holding pin on the bottom of the exit side of said receptacle and a holding flange on the top of the exit side of said receptacle, said holding flange holding the rear portion of said bags only.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,032,259 2/ 1936 Chandler 53-190 X 2,069,266 2/1937 Nicodemus 53l90 X 2,833,097 5/1958 Petrea et a1 53-188 3,075,324 1/1963 Burks et a1 53-189 X 3,138,907 6/1964 Gerbe 53385 3,262,249 7/1966 Finerow 53190 X TRAVIS S. MCGEHEE, Primary Examiner.

R. L. FANIS, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2032259 *Sep 2, 1933Feb 25, 1936Brown Bag Filling Machine CompReceptacle filling and sealing machine
US2069266 *Jun 13, 1933Feb 2, 1937Nicodemus Robert FBagging machine
US2833097 *Mar 5, 1957May 6, 1958Sperry Rand CorpBag applying machine
US3075324 *Apr 15, 1960Jan 29, 1963Hilson Ind IncDispenser apparatus for paper containers
US3138907 *Oct 19, 1961Jun 30, 1964Tele Sonic Packaging CorpBag opening and filling machine
US3262249 *May 16, 1963Jul 26, 1966Abraham FincrowBag opening apparatus for super markets
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3527021 *Oct 2, 1967Sep 8, 1970Farrar Malone HAutomatic bagging machine
US3673759 *Apr 22, 1970Jul 4, 1972Bemis Co IncBag hanger apparatus
US3750365 *Sep 10, 1970Aug 7, 1973Darby Manuf CorpMethod and apparatus for opening and sealing bags
US4124966 *Jan 3, 1977Nov 14, 1978Bonar & Bemis, Ltd.Automatic wicketted bag loader
US4198800 *Jun 29, 1978Apr 22, 1980Bonar & Bemis, Ltd.Automatic wicketted bag loader and method of loading
US4541227 *Aug 4, 1983Sep 17, 1985General Foods CorporationApparatus for automatically packing articles in a bale bag
US5029728 *Dec 22, 1989Jul 9, 1991W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn.Method and apparatus for dispensing packaging bags
US5146731 *Dec 2, 1991Sep 15, 1992The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of AgricultureBagger receiver box
US5495707 *Jun 22, 1994Mar 5, 1996Glopak, Inc.Bagging machine with in-line attaching mechanism
WO2005108211A2 *May 10, 2005Nov 17, 2005Bredenhoff Klaas NicoDevice for supplying and/or filling bags
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/385.1, 53/573, 53/386.1
International ClassificationB65B43/30, B65B43/26, B65B43/36
Cooperative ClassificationB65B43/30, B65B43/36
European ClassificationB65B43/36, B65B43/30