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Publication numberUS3409168 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 5, 1968
Filing dateOct 24, 1965
Priority dateOct 24, 1965
Publication numberUS 3409168 A, US 3409168A, US-A-3409168, US3409168 A, US3409168A
InventorsChmielowiec Louis J
Original AssigneeContinental Can Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container
US 3409168 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 5, 1968 J. CHMIYELQWIEC CONTAINER Filed Oct. 24, 1965 PRIOR ART INVENTOR- LOUIS a. CHMIELOWIEC ATTORNEYS United States Patent ABSTRACT THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates to a container having a body closed byan end secured thereto byafoldedseam. The end includes a panel and a'chuck wall with a lower portionof the latter converging downwardly and radially inwardly toward the end panel. Adhesive means having appreciable tensile strengthcharacteristics is disposed in the space'between the chuck wall and the body for bonding the same to each other and for additionally reinforcing the chuck wall against radial inward deflection there of due to the influence of pressure within the can reacting. on the end panel.

v, Therehave beenmany recent developments in the formation of can ends. Many of these developments relate to the forming of the can ends of thinner gauge metal both for the purpose of facilitating the opening of the associated container and for purposes of economy. However, it has been found that when a can end is formed, of a lighter than normal gauge metal and the can of which the canend is a part is subjected to high internal pressure, the can end has a tendency to buckle andbulge outwardly. This is obviously undesirable.

It .has been found that while a minute portion of the buckling and bulging of the end panel of the can end has been due to a stretching of the metal, a major portion thereof has .been due to the distortion of the chuck wall of the canen-d. Thus, if the chuck Wall of the can end is.reinforced, the buckling and bulging of the end panel will be greatly reduced. Until now, the approach towards. the reinforcing of the chuck wall has been by reversely folding the metal. of the can end immediately adjacent the chuck wall. This reverse folding of the metal not only requires additional metal, but also requires expensive folding steps.

In view of the foregoing, it is the object of this invention to reinforce the chuck wallof a can end against radially inwardly directed deformation due to pressure exerted on the associated end panel by adhesively bonding the chuck wall to the adjacent can body whereby the can body reinforces the chuck-walk It will be readily apparent that when the chuck wall is adhesively bonded tothe can body, the can body and the chuck wall, together with the double seams securing the can end to the can body, all function as a rigid unit and when the chuck wall cannot move away from the end wall, the deflection of the end panel, such as buckling and bulging, is restrictedto the metal which becomes available by the stretching of the metal of the end panel.

It has been found that the necessary adhesive may be readily applied to the chuck wall of a can end prior to the assembling of the can end with a can body, and in the act of assembling the can end with the can body, the adhesive will automatically be directed against the can body so as to form the desired bond between'the can body and the chuck wall.

With the above and other objects in view that will hereinafter appear, the nature of the invention will be more clearly understood by reference to the following detailed description, the appended claims and the several views illustrated in the accompanying drawing.

3,409,168 Patented Nov. 5, 1968 'Inthe drawingt p FIGURE 1 is an exploded fragmentary perspective view of a can end formed in accordance with this inventionand a conventional can body to which it is being pp a FIGURE 2 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view of the can body and can end of FIGURE 1 and shows more specifically the details of the same and the relationship between the same prior to the assembling thereof.

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sec tional view taken through the can end after it has been assembled withthe can body and securedlthereto by means of a conventional double seam. 7

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view similar to FIGURE 3 and shows the state of the prior art prior to this invention.

Referring now to the drawing in detail, reference is first made to FIGURE 4 wherein there is illustrated a conventional can which is generally referred to by the numeral 5. The can 5 includes a can body 6 having the upper end thereof closed by means of a can end which is generally referred to by the numeral 7. The can end 7 is secured to the can body 6 by means of a conventional double seam 8. It is to be noted that in addition to the double seam, the can body 7 includes a chuck wall 9 and an end panel 10. The end panel 10 is connected to the chuck wall 9 by means of a chuck radius 11.

Normally the can end 7 is formed of a sufliciently thick gauge metal so as to resist deformation due to internal pressures within the can 5. However, when the gauge of the metal has been reduced, it has been found that the high pressure within the can 5 reacts against the relatively large area of the end panel 10 and results in the axially outward buckling and bulging of the end panel 10. Further, as the end panel 10 bulges outwardly, it exerts a radially inwardly directed force on the chuck wall 9 through the chuck radius 11 with theresult that the chuck Wall 9 is deformed radially inwardly and the can end 7 generally bend-s along the chuck radius 11. As a result, the can end 7 is deformed to have a shape, such as that generally shown in dotted lines in FIGURE 4. The deformation shown in FIGURE 4 is relatively mild and in certain instances the chuck wall 9 is deformed sufficiently so as to destroy the seal of the double seam 8. It is proposed, in accordance with this invention, to make a can end similar to the can end 7 and of a light gauge metal, but wherein the chuck wall is reinforced when assembled with a can body so as to resist deformation when the end panel of the can end is subjected to highpressures.

Referring now to FIGURE 3, it will be seen that there is illustrated a can 12 which is very. similar to the cam 5. The can 12 includes a can body 13 which may be identical with the can body 6. The upper end of the can body 13 is closed by means of a can end, generally referred to by the numeral 14. The can end 14 is secured to and sealed relative to the can body 13 by means of a conventional double seam 15. The can end 14, in addition to the portion thereof forming parts of the double seam 15, includes a 'chuck wall 16 which is joined to the end panel 17 by means of a chuck radius 18. It is to be noted that the upper portion of the chuck wall 16 is disposed closely adjacent the inner surface of the can body 13. On the other hand, the lower portion of the chuck wall 16 is inwardly tapered and diverges away from the can body.13. This tapering of the lower portion of the chuck wall 16 results in the formation of a generally triangular cross sectional space 20 between the chuck wall 16 and the can body 13. The space 20 is filled with an adhesive 21 which serves to bond the chuck wall 16 to the can body 13 Whereby the upper portion of the can body 13, the chuck wall 16 and the double seam forms a rigid structural unit.

The adhesive 21 is preferably in the form of a thermosetting cement whereby after the can end 14 and the can body 13 have been assembled and double seamed together in a normal closing operation, the can may be slightly heated so as to set the adhesive 21.

It is also to be noted that the adhesive 21 extends inwardly of the can beyond the chuck wall 16 and about a major portion of the chuck radius. It is also to be noted that along the can body 13 the adhesive 21 extends inwardly beyond the end panel 17 so as to form a fillet 22. This fillet 22 reinforces the connection between the chuck wall 16 and the can body 13 and greatly retards any initial rupture of the bond.

Referring now to FIGURES 1 and 2 in particular, it will be seen that there is illustrated the details of the can end 14 prior to the securement thereof to the can body 13. It is to be noted that the chuck wall 16, prior to the attachment of the end 14 to the can body, tapers downwardly towards the end panel 17. It is also to be noted that the upper end of the chuck wall 16 terminates in the usual peripheral curl 23 normally found in can ends which are to be double seamed to the can body. The adhesive 21 is applied to the can end 14 prior to the assembling thereof with the can body 13. It is to be noted that the adhesive 21 increases in thickness downwardly so as to be generally triangular in cross section. The adhesive 21 has an outer surface which is substantially cylindrical. It is also to be noted that the outer surface of the adhesive 21 is'rounded as at 24 where it passes around the chuck radius 18.

At this time it is also pointed out that the can body 13 is provided at its end with a conventional flange 25 for cooperation with the curl 23 in the formation of the double seam 15. Due to the configuration of the upper end of the can body 13, it will be seen that when the can end 14 is moved downwardly into the can body 13, the adhesive 21 will freely move into the can body 13. At this time it is pointed out that the adhesive 21 is substantially solid at the time the can end 14 is applied to the can body so that there is no wiping off or smearing of the adhesive 21. However, during the double seaming operation, when the upper portion of the chuck wall 16 is deformed to generally conform to the can body 13, it will be readily apparent that there will be a squeezing out of the adhesive 21 so that the adhesive will be reshaped to have the configuration shown in FIGURE 3.

The adhesive 21 securely bonding the chuck wall 16 to the upper part of the can body 13, the chuck wall 16 and the can body 13 form a rigid unit which resists deformation from the influence of internal pressures on the end panel 17. Thus, the can end 14, as applied to the can body in the manner shown in FIGURE 3, may be formed of lighter than normal gauge metal and at the same time will not have the disadvantages previously resulting from utilizing such light gauge metal.

It is pointed out here that although the can end 14 is illustrated as having a plain end panel 17, the end panel 17 may be provided with an arrangement of offset panels for reinforcing purposes. Also, it is pointed out that while the can end 14 is of the type which would normally be opened with a punch type opener, the end panel 17 may have incorporated therein any easy opening feature of the type which includes a removable panel portion.

I claim:

1. A can particularly adapted for the packaging of a product under a high pressure, said can comprising a can body having at least one end thereof closed by means of a can end secured thereto by means of a folded seam,

said can end including an end panel and a chuck wall, said chuck wall forming part of said seam and being disposed in telescoped relation within an end of said can body, said end panel being subjected to outward bowing under pressure, non-metallic adhesive means having appreciable tensiie strength characteristics for bonding said chuck wall to said can body and for reinforcing said chuck wall against radial inward deflection due to the influence of pressure within said can reacting on said end panel, and said folded seam being devoid of said adhesive means.

2. The can of claim 1 wherein said adhesive reinforcing means extends on said can body axially inwardly beyond said chuck wall and forms a fillet reinforcing the bonded connection between said chuck wall and said can body.

3. The can of claim 1 wherein said adhesive reinforcing means is a thermosetting cement.

4. The can of claim 1 wherein said adhesive is a bonding material such as thermosetting cement or solder.

5. The can of claim 1 wherein said chuck wall includes an outer portion disposed in an axial direction which is tightly clamped against said can body and an inner portion disposed in an axial direction converging inwardly from said can body in a radial direction appreciably beyond said folded seam to leave a space between said chuck wall and said can body, and said adhesive reinforcing means fills said space.

6. The can of claim 5 wherein said adhesive-reinforcing means is a thermosetting adhesive.

7. The can of claim 1 wherein said chuck wall is connected to said end panel by a chuck radius, and said adhesive-reinforcing means also extends between said chuck radius and said can body.

8. The can of claim 7 wherein said adhesive reinforcing means extends on said can body axially inwardly beyond said chuck radius and forms a fillet reinforcing the bonded connection between said chuck wall and said can body.

9. The can of claim 8 wherein said adhesive-reinforcing means is a thermosetting adhesive.

10. A can end particularly adapted for use as a part of a can subjected to internal pressure and formed of sheet metal, said can end including an end panel, a surrounding chuck wall, and a peripheral curl, said chuck wall tapering towards said end panel, and a coating of thermosetting adhesive on said chuck wall, said adhesive coating decreasing in thickness away from said end panel and having an exposed surface of a cylindrical configuration whereby a maximum amount of adhesive is available for the later bonding of said chuck wall to a can body.

11. A can end particularly adapted for use as a part of a can subjected to internal pressure and formed of lighter than normal gauge metal, said can end including an end panel, a surrounding chuck wall, and a peripheral curl, said chuck wall tapering toward said end panel, and a coating of adhesive on said chuck wall, said adhesive coating decreasing in thickness away from said end panel and having an exposed surface of a cylindrical configuration whereby a maximum amount of adhesive is available for the later bonding of said chuck wall to a can body.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 504,547 9/ 1893 Winfield 220-67 816,625 4/1906 Wallace et al. 220-67 2,154,349 4/ 1939 OBrien 220-67 2,584,095 1/ 1952 Slaughter 220-67 THERON E. CONDON, Primary Examiner.

J. R. GARRETT, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US504547 *Sep 5, 1893The Winfield manufacturing CompanyWilliam c
US816625 *Jun 3, 1905Apr 3, 1906John W WallaceTank or can.
US2154349 *Dec 23, 1937Apr 11, 1939Continental Can CoCan closure
US2584095 *Jun 13, 1946Jan 29, 1952Extruded Plastics IncTubular container
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4211339 *Dec 11, 1978Jul 8, 1980Onoda Cement Co., Ltd.Laminated paper container with sealed seams
US4724826 *Sep 15, 1986Feb 16, 1988Showa Aluminum CorporationSolar water heater incorporating heat pipe
US4735863 *Jul 28, 1986Apr 5, 1988Dayton Reliable Tool & Mfg. Co.Shell for can
US4862722 *Feb 5, 1988Sep 5, 1989Dayton Reliable Tool & Mfg. Co.Method for forming a shell for a can type container
US6102243 *Aug 26, 1998Aug 15, 2000Crown Cork & Seal Technologies CorporationCan end having a strengthened side wall and apparatus and method of making same
US6408498Jul 26, 2000Jun 25, 2002Crown Cork & Seal Technologies CorporationCan end having a strengthened side wall and apparatus and method of making same
US6915553Feb 19, 2003Jul 12, 2005Rexam Beverage Can CompanySeaming apparatus and method for cans
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/614, 220/619, D09/454
International ClassificationB65D53/00, B65D53/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D7/36, B65D7/34
European ClassificationB65D7/34, B65D7/36