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Publication numberUS3410078 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1968
Filing dateApr 27, 1964
Priority dateApr 27, 1964
Publication numberUS 3410078 A, US 3410078A, US-A-3410078, US3410078 A, US3410078A
InventorsFreedman Arnold, Herbert I Greenblatt
Original AssigneeSynthetic Thread Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Thread
US 3410078 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 12, 1968 FREEDMAN ET AL 3,410,078

THREAD 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 27, 1964 W M N wA U T M E N NDE Du BER o VE T Nm M 1 L R E N mm E H Nov. 12, 1968 A. FREEDMAN ET AL 3,410,078

THREAD Filed April 27, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG.3

INVENTOR. ARNOLD FREEDMAN BY HERBERT LGREENBLATT @mmma ATTORNEY United States Patent THREAD Arnold Freedman, Allentown, Pa., and Herbert I. Greenblatt, Woodmere, N.Y., assignors to Synthetic Thread Company, Inc., Bethlehem, Pa., a corporation of New York Filed Apr. 27, 1964, Ser. No. 362,769 11 Claims. (Cl. 57144) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates to a novel thread and more particularly to a thread provided with ac ore and sheath of different materials.

Heretofore, it has been found highly desirable for many purposes to use a strong thread consisting of continuous filament yarn such as nylon, silk, rayon, polyester fibers or the like. However, continuous filament yarns lack ultraviolet and chemical resistance and do not possess the elasticity required for certain applications. Furthermore, continuous filament yarns do not expand in the presence of moisture to seal needle holes as is particularly desirable in sewing together materials for awnings, tarpaulins, tents, umbrellas and other coverings. In addition, continuous filament yarns are not adapted for use in high speed sewing operations for the reason that the build-up of needle heat can cause melting of the continuous filament yarn. Continuous filament yarns may also slip back through a stitching pattern as a result of their smooth surface and relative inelasticity. As a consequence, despite the many highly desirable characteristics of continuous filament yarns their use is oftentimes limited.

It is therefore one of the primary objects of this invention to provide a thread which has all of the desirable characteristics of continuous filament yarns and none of the deficiencies thereof.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a thread which possesses high tensile strength together with ultraviolet and chemical resistance and elasticity.

Another object of the present invention is to 'provide a thread which may be effectively used in high speed seW- ing operations without any damage to the thread and which does not slip back through the stitching pattern.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a thread which, while very strong, is nevertheless possessed of the characteristic of expanding in the presence of moisture to seal needle holes and make the resultant product as waterproof as possible.

The invention comprises a thread having a core of continuous filament yarn which is enwrapped by a thread of staple fiber, as for example, cotton. The continuous filament yarn, according to the present invention as illustrated and described herein, consists of a bundle of untwisted fibers, although, it will be understood that this description is purely for illustrative purposes as the continuous filament may be provided with a twist of from Zero to a limited number of twists while still producing the desired result.

The present invention provides a unique and highly desirable thread produced by utilizing a staple fiber which is provided with a Z-twist or an S-twist before being wound upon the filament yarn. The direction of twisting of the staple fiber upon the continuous filament yarn is in the opposite direction from the twist given the staple fiber prior to winding. In addition, the staple fiber may be given a silicone coating justprior to being wound upon the continuous filament yarn core.

The invention will be described in greater detail in connection with the drawings in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates diagrammatically the formation of the combination thread of this invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of a fragment of the thread produced by the apparatus of FIG. 1, in accordance with this invention; and

FIG. 3 shows a compound machine for making a twoply thread similar to the single-ply thread of FIG. 2.

The apparatus of FIG. 1 includes a cone 11 of thread 12, of a staple fiber such as cotton, other natural fibers, or material which acts like natural or staple fibers. The thread 12 is twisted with either a Z-twist or an S-twist prior to being wound upon the cone 11. As it is unwound from the cone, the thread 12 passes over a pulley which is simply illustrated in the form of a bar 13.

Adjacent the cone 11 is another cone 14 upon which is wound a continuous filament yarn 16, such as Dacron or nylon, or other relatively endless yarn. This yarn will be hereinafter referred to as the core material, since it is the center of the thread to be formed in accordance with this invention. Furthermore, in accordance with the present invention, it is provided with no twist or substantially no twist such as a very limited twist. The core material 16 is unwound from the cone 14 and passes over the same pulley 13 as the fiber 12.

After passing over the pulley 13, the fiber 12 comes in contact with a rotating drum 17 whose surface passes through a container 18 of silicone coating liquid. The liquid is carried by the drum and applied to the surface of the fiber 12. Thereafter the fiber 12 passes into a tensioning device 19.

The core material 16, on the other hand, is not coated with the silicone material, but passes directly into a tensioning device 21.

A Godet 22 comprising a large roller 23 and a smaller roller 24 is disposed below the tensioning devices 19 and 21. The core material 16 and the fiber 12 are wound together on the Godet and pass off of the Godet as a single fiber 26 into the top ring 27 of a twisting device. Thereafter the fiber 26 passes through a twisting ring 28 and on to a spindle 29.

Prior to being wound on the spindle 29, fiber 12 is wound about the core material 16 in the manner shown in FIG. 2. Initially, as aforesaid, the fiber 12 is twisted with an S-twist or a Z-twist. In either case the fiber 12 is wrapped over the core material in such fashion as to completely encase the core material 16-with a layer of fiber 12. Specifically, in accordance with the present invention, in the event the fiber 12 was originally provided with an S-twist, it is wound about the core material with a Z- twist movement, which is the situation shown for illustrative purposes in FIG. 2. In the event the fiber Was originally provided with a Z-twist it is wound about the core material with an S-twist movement. Twisting the fiber about the core material in a direction opposite to the twist of the original fiber, it has been discovered, causes the fiber to completely encase the core material and a thread is thereby provided which has all of the desirable' characteristics of both the staple fibers and the continuous filament yarn in a unique and novel combination thread.

The twisting of the fiber 12 upon the core material 16 may or may not put turns into the core material. The resultant thread may be made with relatively high integrity or it may be made with lesser integrity by using tensioned core material 16, particularly Dacron, and untensioned ends of cotton for the thread 12 run through the same twisting spindle and Godet.

While FIG. 2 shows only a single-ply material, i.e., a thread having one core bundle and one wrapping bundle, it may, under certain conditions, be desirable to provide a multi-ply thread in which two or more of the combination threads shown in FIG. 2 are twisted together to form a thicker, stronger, more complex thread. A machine for producing such a multi-ply thread is shown in FIG. 3, in which there are two cones 11 and 111 on which the staple fiber threads 12 and 112 are wound. Alongside the cones 11 and 111 are two cones 14 and 114 on which are wound the core material 16 and 116. Both the threads 12 and 112 and the core materials 16 and 116 pass over a pulley 13, after which the staple fibers 12 and 112 are silicone coated on rollers 17 which are run within silicone baths 18 and 118. The coated fibers then enter tensioning members 19 and 119, while the core material enters tensioning members 21 and 121 close by. The core material 21 and the fiber 19 are then wound upon a Godet 22, while the core material 121 and the fiber 119 are wound upon a similar Godet 122. Thereafter the combined fibers 26 and 126 from the Godets 22 and 122, respectively, are twisted to form threads as shown in FIG. 2 and wound upon spindles 29 and 129.

In order to produce a two-ply thread, the combination threads from the spindles 29 and 129 pass through tensioning devices 31 and 32 to a Godet 33 and from thence to a winding apparatus 34, including a spindle 36 where the two combination threads are wound together to form a two-ply combination thread.

After being wound upon the spindle 36 the combination thread of the present invention indicated generally by the reference character 37, passes around rollers 38 and through a heating chamber 39 which is electrically heated by current from a source 41. The thread is then passed around rollers 42 and over the drum 43 which is rotating in a silicone bath 44. There is thereby provided an additional coat of silicone material to the two-ply thread although it will be understood that this step is not essential to the present invention. Thereafter the twoply thread passes over rollers 46 and is wound upon the cone 47.

While the invention has been described in detail in connection with the method of manufacture thereof, it will be understood that it is in no way limited to the specifics set forth. The description is merely for illustrative purposes and should not be construed to limit the invention or the scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A combination sewing thread comprising a core material of relatively inelastic, endless, continuous filament yarns having substantially no twist and enwrapped by a stable fiber thread having an initial twist in one direction said staple fiber thread being Wrapped around said yarns in the opposite direction from said initial twist.

2. A combination sewing thread comprising a core material of relatively inelastic, endless, continuous filament yarns having no twist and enwrapped by staple fiber thread having an initial twist in one direction, said staple fiber thread being wrapped around said yarns in the opposite direction from said initial twist.

3. A combination sewing thread comprising a core material of substantially inelastic continuous filament yarns having substantially no twist and enwrapped by cotton thread having an initial twist in one direction said cotton thread being twisted on said core material in the opposite direction from said initial twist.

4. A combination sewing thread comprising a core material of substantially inelastic continuous filament yarns having substantially no twist; and a staple fiber thread wrapped around said core material, said stple fiber thread having an initial twist in one direction, said staple fiber thread being wrapped around said core material in the opposite direction from said intial twst.

5. A combination sewing thread comprising a core .4 material of substantially inelastic continuous filament yarns having substantially no twist; a staple fiber htread wrapped around said core material, said staple fiber thred having one direction of twist prior to being wrapped around said core material and being wrapped in the opposite direction; and a layer of silicone on said staple fiber thread.

6. A combination, sewing thread comprising a core of tensioned Dacron fibers having substantially no twist; and a wrapping thread wrapped around said Dacron fibers in one direction, said wrapping thread comprising untensioned cotton fibers having an initial twist in the opposite direction.

7. A combination sewing thread comprising a core material of polyester fibers having substantially no twist and a thread of natural cotton wrapped aroundsaid core material in one direction, said cotton having an initial twist in the opposite direction.

8. A combination sewing thread comprising first and second plies, said first ply comprising a first core of substantially inelastic continuous filament yarns having initially, substantially no twist; a first staple fiber thread wrapped around said core material, said staple fiber thread having initially one direction of twist prior to being wrapped around said core material and being wrapped around said core material in the opposite direction; said second ply comprising a second core material of substantially inelastic continuous filament yarns having substantially no twist; and a second staple fiber thread wrapped around said core material and having initially one direction of twist prior to being wrapped around said second core material and being wrapped in the opposite direction around said second core material, said first and second plies being twisted together.

9. The process of forming a combination sewing thread comprising the steps of enwrapping a staple fiber thread twisted in one direction around a substantially inelastic continuous filament yarn by twisting said staple fiber thread around said yarn in a direction opposite to the direction of twist of said staple fiber thread.

10. The process of claim 9 comprising the additional step of coating said staple fiber thread with silicone prior to wrapping said staple fiber thread around said continuous filament yarns.

11. The process of forming a combination sewing thread comprising the steps of enwrapping a staple fiber thread twisted in one direction around a substantially inelastic continuous filament yarn having substantially no twist by twisting said staple fiber thread around said yarn in a direction opposite to the direction of twist of said staple fiber thread.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,205,285 6/1940 Farrell 57-139 2,207,641 7/1940 Smith 57-139 2,313,058 3/ 1943 Francis 57-140 2,769,300 11/1956 Luttge 57-144 XR 2,890,567 6/1959 Taylor 57--140 2,901,884 9/1959 Weinberger 57140 3,098,347 7/1963 Smith 57140 3,115,745 12/1963 Lathem 57-152 XR Re. 25,416 7/1963 Comer 57152 XR 2,526,523 10/1950 Weiss 57 144 XR 3,092,953 6/1963 Blackstock 5'7160 XR 3,264,816 8/1966 Jaggi 57-160 FOREIGN PATENTS 564,278 10/ 1958 Canada. 306,007 2/ 1929 Great Britain. 311,052 5/ 1929 Great Britain. 311.447 5/1929 Great Britain.

FRANK J. COHEN, Primary Examiner.

DONALD E. WATKINS, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US2207641 *Dec 21, 1939Jul 9, 1940Smith Wilbert DElastic yarn
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GB311447A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3495393 *Mar 4, 1968Feb 17, 1970Teijin LtdNon- or low-stretch composite yarn of super high bulk
US3596459 *Jul 1, 1969Aug 3, 1971Teijin LtdProcess of producing a nonstretch or low-stretch composite yarn of super high bulkiness
US3603071 *Apr 22, 1970Sep 7, 1971Goodyear Tire & RubberCords for annular reinforcing tire belts
US3688811 *Mar 6, 1970Sep 5, 1972Takeuchi KeisakuMethod of establishing a warp joint of a stranded wire and stranded wires used therein
US4272950 *Dec 7, 1978Jun 16, 1981Commissariat A L'energie AtomiqueFiliform textile material
US4308897 *Aug 7, 1979Jan 5, 1982Scapa Dryers, Inc.Dryer felt with encapsulated, bulky center yarns
US4375779 *Apr 24, 1981Mar 8, 1983Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyComposite sewing thread of ceramic fibers
US4430851 *Jan 29, 1982Feb 14, 1984Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMultistrands of graphite, silicon carbide, or metal oxide ceramics
US4495760 *Jun 7, 1982Jan 29, 1985Vanhelle Michel E AProcess and apparatus for spinning cored filaments, and cored filaments thus obtained
US4840021 *Feb 22, 1988Jun 20, 1989Sa SchappeContinuous multifilament sewing thread and process for making same
US5016434 *Sep 11, 1989May 21, 1991W. Schlafhorst Ag & Co.Ring spinning and spooling frame
US5735110 *Mar 18, 1997Apr 7, 1998Hoechst AktiengesellschaftHigh strength, sewing
EP0085537A2 *Jan 26, 1983Aug 10, 1983Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyTwisted ceramic fiber sewing thread
EP0241857A2 *Apr 8, 1987Oct 21, 1987Ackermann-Göggingen AgSewing thread
EP0279756A1 *Feb 18, 1988Aug 24, 1988"S.A. SCHAPPE" Société Anonyme dite:Multifilament sewing thread and method for making the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification57/211, 57/903, 57/313, 57/210, 139/383.00A, 57/12, 57/7, 57/232
International ClassificationD02G3/46, D02G3/38
Cooperative ClassificationY10S57/903, D10B2201/02, D10B2331/04, D02G3/36, D10B2331/02, D02G3/46
European ClassificationD02G3/46, D02G3/38