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Publication numberUS3411191 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1968
Filing dateAug 20, 1964
Priority dateAug 20, 1964
Publication numberUS 3411191 A, US 3411191A, US-A-3411191, US3411191 A, US3411191A
InventorsDower Edward W, Ikert George H
Original AssigneeElgin Metal Casket Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for sealing openings in a casket
US 3411191 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 19, 1968 3. H. IKERT T AL METHOD FOR SEALING OPENINGS IN A CASKET 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 20, 1964 w; w w m w W17 f7 2% MW Z M w 7 Nov. 19, 1968 G. H. IKERT ET AL METHOD FOR SEALING OPENINGS IN A GASKET 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 20. 1964 Nov. 19, 1968 m- ET AL METHOD FOR SEALING OPENINGS IN A CASKET Filed Aug. 20. 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 United States Patent l 3,411,191 METHOD FOR SEALING OPENINGS IN A CASKET George H. Ikert, Elgin, and Edward W. Dower, Dundee,

Ill., assignors to Elgin Metal Casket Company, Elgin,

III., a corporation of Illinois Filed Aug. 20, 1964, Ser. No. 390,859 4 Claims. (Cl. 27-6) This invention relates to a burial casket and to means for sealing it.

It relates particularly to means for sealing perforations which are made in a burial casket for attachment of handles or any devices which are secured to the casket.

A burial casket is generally sealed to make it air tight. Many burial caskets are made of metal and special steps are then taken to seal the casket lid. Since this is done, it is important to seal the casket throughout. When handles or ornaments, for example, are added to a metal casket, perforations are made in the metal for the attachment of these devices. Such perforations obviously destroy the air tightness which would otherwise be inherent in a metal casket.

It has heretofore been a serious problem to seal or reseal such perforations and unless they are individually sealed, they destroy the air tightness of a casket. It is therefore one of the objects of this invention to provide sealing method for a casket which permits attachment of accessories and accomplishes sealing of the casket at the points of perforation for the attachment of such accessories.

This sealing method is effective Whether the casket wall is perforated before or after the installation of the sealing means. Generally as a matter of convenience, handles, ornaments and any other accessory members will be installed before the sealing means of this invention is in place. However, if this sealing means is in place and afterwards the casket wall or lid is perforated for the attachment of additional devices, the sealing means of this invention will nonetheless accomplish and retain full sealing.

Other objects and purposes of this invention will appear in the ensuing specification, drawings and claims.

The invention is illustrated more or less diagrammatically in the following drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of one form of casket with the sealing means in place,

FIGURE 2 is a transverse section taken on an enlarged scale at line 2-2 of FIGURE 1,

FIGURE 3 is a transverse section taken on an enlarged scale at line 3-3 through the lid of FIGURE 1 showing the liner in place,

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of a modified form of sealing means which is made as a unit and inserted into the casket,

FIGURE 5 is a cross sectional view, similar to FIG- URE 2, showing a casket with the sealing insert of FIG- URE 4 in place,

FIGURE 6 is a cross sectional view through the lid or top of the casket showing a completed sealing method in place as a unit,

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view of a sectional mold which may optionally be used to mold or cast the sealing means within the casket,

FIGURE 8 is a diagrammatic view of the sectional mold on a reduced scale showing a means for applying 3,411,191 Patented Nov. 19, 1968 ice pressure to expand or tighten the sectional mold of FIG- URE 7.

FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary sectional detail showing a portion of a casket with generally straight sides to which the sectional mold of FIGURE 7 is applied, and

FIGURE 10 is a view, similar to FIGURE 9, showing a modified form of casket with the sectional mold moditied for use with a casket of this type. The casket of FIGURE 10 is generally referred to an urn style casket.

Like reference numerals will be used to designate like parts in the following description of the invention.

In the particular form shown, the casket is of metal and is provided with a hinged top of the so-called cut top type. That is to say, the top or lid of the casket is formed in two separate pieces which are separately hinged and which together form a complete top or closure for the casket.

1 indicates generally the side wall of the casket. It is preferably made of metal and may be given a variety of shapes. The outline or contour shown in FIGURES 1, 2, 5 and 9 is a typical so-called Straight Side Casket. It is convenient to make the casket of several side and end pieces which are welded together. The welding step is not shown as its details form no part of the present invention.

In the particular form here shown, the straight side casket has a lower enlargement 2 and an upper enlargement 3 which may be smaller than the enlargement 2. A bottom plate 4 closes the casket and is provided with overlapping portions 5 which rest upon inwardly extending portions 6 of the enlargement 2 and are welded to them.

The top comprises two sections 7, 7, each of which is provided at one end with a relatively flat portion 8 and at the other end with a curved end portion 9 which conforms to and harmonizes with the longitudinal curved portion 10. Hinges 11 are provided in suitable number. A latch or lock 12 for each top or lid section is provided with a member which engages a depression 13. A limiting member 14 is provided for each top section to limit its opening movement.

A sealing member or gasket 15 is provided about the upper face of the enlargement 13 and cooperates with the lid to accomplish air tight sealing of the lid against the body of the casket.

A sealing member may also be provided between the portions 8 of the top so that the entire top is sealed.

None of the sealing details against the casket body or against each other from any part of the present invention. It is sufficient that sealing means are provided.

The upper enlargement 3 is provided with a flat surface 16 which may have one or more perforations 17, and purpose of which will be explained below.

Each lid or top section will preferably have an integral flange surface member 18 which is provided with one or more perforations 19, which will be explained below.

The details of the present invention are not limited in any way to the particular shape of a casket. However, the casket shown in FIGURE 10 is illustrated as a detailed section through a so-called urn type casket. The sides of the urn" casket are curved outwardly to produce the outwardly extending portion 20 which is continued through the circumference of the casket. Otherwise the casket of FIGURE 10 is the same as that illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 2 and the same reference numerals apply to the details of construction; hence, these features need not be redescribed.

In the caskets of FIGURES 1, 2 and 3 and FIGURES 9 and 10, the sealing lining is cast or molded within the casket body after it has been completed. In the modified form of FIGURES 4, and 6, the casket and casket top or cover are identical with those shown in FIGURES 1, 2, 3 and 9, but the insulating liner is made as a separate unitary piece, there being one piece for the body and one for the top, or one for each section of the top in case the lining is to be applied to a cut top casket.

As shown in FIGURE 4, the liner comprises a box-like member 21 which preferably has side flanges 22 extending about its upper edge and being so dimensioned that they overlie the fiat portion 1 6 of the upper enlargement 3 of the side 1. They are coextensive with the upper surface of the member 16.

In FIGURE 6, a unitary preformed top liner 22 is shown. It is provided with lateral extending integral flanges 23 which are coextensive with the portions 18 of the top or top section to which the liner is applied.

Handles or other accessories have been mentioned above. They are shown only in FIGURES 1 and 2. It is to be understood however that caskets generally require handles and many have ornaments attached externally. It is to be considered, therefore, that the handles shown in FIGURES 1 and 2 or comparable handles would normally be applied to caskets such as those shown in FIG- URES 5, 9 and and the problem of sealing these caskets is general throughout all of them.

In one form, as shown in FIGURES 1 and 2, a handle in the shape of a bar 24 is provided, one along each side of the casket. The bars are received in brackets 25 which are secured to or integral with plates 26. The plates 26 will generally be bolted or riveted to the casket wall. As shown in the present from of the invention, they are secured by bolts 27. Obviously the side walls of the casket must be perforated for the attachment of these bolts and it is the sealing of these perforations which forms one part of the present invention.

Similar handles 28 are preferably secured to the ends of the casket. These may be received in brackets 29 which are welded or riveted or lbolted directly to the end plates of the casket. The precise means of securement are not shown since their details form no part of the invention, but it is to be understood that the securement of the end handles generally requires the formation of a perforation or opening through the end wall of the casket.

While no ornaments are shown, frequently ornaments and name plates are applied to caskets, either to the sides or to the top, and almost always perforations must be made in the casket structure because such ornaments will usually be riveted or bolted to the top or side or wherever they may be secured.

The use, operation and function of this invention are as follows:

It is obvious that a metal casket with suitable locks and hinges and with a suitable gasket may be made air tight. It is equally obvious that when the casket wall or top is perforated to receive rivets or bolts, the gasket sealing would become useless and ineffective unless the performations formed to receive the rivets or bolts were fully sealed.

In the past this has been done in a variety of ways but it has always required an additional operation and each perforation formed to receive each bolt, rivet or other fastener had required separate and sometimes difficult and expensive sealing, such as the direct application of solder or other sealing material to each nut and bolt and to each rivet.

It is therefore one of the prime objects of the present invention to provide means and a method for sealing such openings in the casket structure due to the installation of handles, ornaments, locks and the like in a single, simple fashion.

There are shown herewith two structures and two molds for accomplishing this additional sealing of perforations irrespective of the number of perforations which may have been formed and irrespective of the time at which such perforations were made.

In one form, a preshaped or precast insert is put into the casket and into the casket top. Thus, as shown in FIGURE 5, the sealing means 21 has been inserted into a straight side casket and the side flanges '22 have preferably been sealed to the casket projections 16.

Similarly, a preformed top sealing liner 22 has been secured in place within the top 7.

When a casket as shown in FIGURE 5 has a top or top sections as shown in FIGURE 6 added to it, it will preferably have an additional gasket such as that shown at 15 in FIGURE 1, although the sealing contact between the members 22 and 23 may be sufiicient and may make the added sealing member 15 unnecessary.

When a preformed liner or sealing liner such as 21 is used, it will be formed outside of the casket and may be cast or otherwise shaped by any desired means. When completed, it is installed as shown in FIGURES 5 and 6.

A preferable method of forming the sealing liner is shown in FIGURES 1, 2, 3, 9 and 10. As thus shown in the figures just mentioned, the liner is cast or molded within the casket. It may be a unitary mold, such as shown in FIGURES 1 to 3 inclusive, or it may be a sectional mold, such as shown in FIGURES 8 to 10 inelusive.

The mold as shown in FIGURE 1 comprises a troughlike body 30 with lateral flanges 31 along it upper edge. When it is to be used, it is inserted into the casket in the position of FIGURE 2. It may carry a number of wooden strips or members 32 which are secured to the mold by screws 33 or otherwise. The mold 30 will preferably be provided with one or two perforations 34 which may carry removable stoppers 35.

A similar :mold will be used for the top or for each top section in case a cut top is to be used. This mold is preferably shaped as shown in FIGURE 3 and is designated by the numeral 36. It may carry a number of wooden strips 37 held to it by screws 38. It will also have one or more perforations 39 closed by removable stoppers 40.

In the modified form of the mold, as shown in FIG- URES 7 to 10 inclusive, the mold is a sectional mold and comprises side pieces 41, 41 and end pieces 42, 42. As shown particularly in FIGURE 7, there are angularly shaped corner pieces 43. This sectional mold would be inserted in the casket in a relatively collapsed condition. That is to say, it would not be extended to its full length or full width. The mold sections will carry wooden strips 44 held in place by screws or nails 45.

A comparison of FIGURES 9 and 10 will show that for the urn type casket the side and end members of the sectional mold are similar to those shown in FIGURE 7, except that they are curved outwardly. Since they differ in that respect, they are referred to by different reference numerals. Thus the urn type mold includes side portions 46 outwardly flared or bulged, as at 47, and carrying wooden strips or projections 48 held in place by screws or nails 49. The member 47 also is perforated at one or more places, as at 50, and the perforationsmay be closed by removable stoppers or closures 51.

The sectional mold, when inserted into the casket, as has been mentioned, is in a somewhat collapsed state and rests upon the bottom of the casket, as shown in FIG- URES 9 and 10. Means are provided for expanding the mold and these include a pressure cylinder 52 which is shown only diagrammatically. Members 53, 53 may be forced outwardly by pressure within the cylinder. Each of the members 53 is rigid and is joined at its outer end, as at 54, to rigid pressure applying members 55 which are shown in FIGURE 8 and are positioned against the corner members 43 of the sectional mold. When the sectional mold portions are to be expanded or moved out wardly, the pressure cylinder is secured to a source of pressure, not shown, the members 53 are forced outwardly and, through the joints or connections 54 and the members 55, apply pressure to the corners 43 of the mold and thus expand it until all parts of the mold are in contact with the upper edge 16 of the casket.

With the mold either in the form of FIGURES 1 and 2 or FIGURES 9 and 10, the stoppers or plugs 35 or 51 are removed and plastic in fluent condition is discharged into the space between the mold and the casket body.

If desired, members 56 may be placed within the space enclosed by the mold and the casket body. They will have only the function of partially filling the space to reduce the amount of plastic which is required to fill the space. Whether the members 56 or their equivalent are present or not, the space between the mold and the casket body is filled with plastic.

Perforations or openings 17 permit the escape of air so that the entire enclosed space may readily be filled. Obviously when it is filled, some plastic will escape through the opening or openings, thus indicating to an operator that the entire enclosed space has been filled and that no further plastic or other filling material need be discharged into the enclosed space.

When the space is completely filled, the plugs or stoppers 35 or 51 may, if desired, be reinserted until the plastic is sufiiciently hard. They may then be removed.

When the plastic is sufiiciently hard to retain the wooden members 44 or 48 or 32 in place within the body of the plastic, the screws 33 or nails 45 are removed. The closure members 35 or 51 may be removed since the plastic is now hard enough to stay in place. The mold may then be removed. The woden members 32 or 44 or 48 will be retained in place within the body of the plastic and will furnish supports to which an ornamental lining or other finish of the interior of the casket may be secured by pinning, stapling, tacking, adhesives or otherwise.

When the molds are to be used again, new wooden members 32 or 44 or 48 will be secured to them and the stoppers or plugs will be replaced.

The method of supplying plastic to the space enclosed by the top or cover and the mold or molds cooperating with the top is the same as that above described. The top or top sections will generally be inverted and the mold put in place. The stoppers or plugs 40 will be removed and plastic supplied through the openings 39. Air will escape through the openings 19 and the operator will know when the mold is filled by the commencement of some plastic escaping through the perforations 19. After the plastic is sufficiently hard, the fastenings 38 will be removed and the wooden members 37 will remain in place within the body of plastic.

It may be desired to avoid the necessity of added finishing lining or ornamentation in a casket and for that purpose the mold 36 will be provided with an ornamental surface or texturelike finish. Such a mold will produce a design or ornamental body of plastic and such an effect is indicated in FIGURE 1 at 57, which shows the exposed surface of a body of plastic molded within the top or cover section 7. Any suitable design may be provided by the texture or appearance given to the face of the mold which is in contact with the plastic during the forming operation. Generally when the mold is shaped to give such an ornamental appearance to the plastic being molded, no lining will be added and in that case the wooden members will be omitted from the mold and the mold will simply be shaped suitably to provide the appearance desired.

Whereas the preferred forms of the invention have been shown and described herein, it should be realized that there are many modifications, substitutions and alterations thereto within the scope of the following claims.

In particular, the invention is not limited to any individual plastic or plastics and it is within the contemplation of the invention to use any suitable plastic. Actually plastic of different types may be used to form one casket lining. Also, the members 32, 47 and 44 may be made of any material which will receive tacks or staples or other fasteners. Frequently these members will be made of wood but they need not be so made. Other materials are available and the invention is not in any way to be limited to any particular material for these inserts.

It is also within the contemplation of the invention that the filling material which constitutes the sealing liner may be of such consistency that it alone will be satisfactory as a tack or staple receiving material. Among such materials are hardboard, cardboard, twisted paper rope and plastic of a sufiicient high density. One suitable plastic is sold under the trade name of Polylite, which is available in several different formulas. This material is mentioned, however, only as one presently available example of a presently suitable plastic.

We claim:

1. The method of sealing openings in a burial casket which comprises the steps of forming a casket,

placing therein a removable mold, supporting said mold upon said casket and thereby producing a confined volume within the casket and between the casket and the mold,

thereafter introducing between the mold and the casket a quantity of fiuid plastic material,

retaining the mold in place until the plastic material has become self-sustaining, and

thereafter removing the mold from within the casket.

2. The method of sealing openings in a burial casket which comprises the steps of forming a casket,

placing therein a removable mold, supporting said mold upon said casket and thereby producing a confined volume within the casket and between the mold and the casket,

providing fastener receiving members releasably supported on said mold in positions to be disposed within said volume when the mold is in place within the casket,

thereafter introducing between the mold and the casket a quantity of fluid plastic material,

retaining the mold in place until the plastic material has become self-sustaining,

separating the mold from the fastener receiving members, and

removing the mold from within the casket.

3. The method of sealing openings in the wall of a burial casket which comprises the steps of forming a casket,

placing therein a mold, supporting said mold upon an upper portion of said casket and thereby producing a confined volume within the casket and between the casket and the mold,

thereafter introducing between the mold and the casket and filling the space enclosed by the mold and the casket a quantity of fluid plastic material,

retaining the mold in place until the plastic material has become self-sustaining, and

removing the mold from within the casket.

4. The method of sealing openings in the structure of a metallic burial casket which comprises the steps of forming a casket of metal having an open top,

placing therein, through the top, a metallic mold, supporting said mold upon the edge of said open top of said casket and thereby producing a confined volume within the casket and between the casket and the mold, securing fastener receiving members to the mold in a position between the mold and the casket,

thereafter placing between the mold and the casket and filling the space enclosed by the mold and the casket a quantity of fluid plastic material,

retaining the mold in place until the plastic material has become self-sustaining,

7 s separating the mold from the fastener receiving parts, 2,832,995 5/1958 McCaw 1834 2,963,766 12/1960 Wallace 2717 removing thfi mold from WlthiIl thfi Casket. 3 1 4 0 Hotchkiss References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,530,328 3/1925 Reiboldt 249146 2,218,047 10/1940 MacDonald et a1 277 5 RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner.

W. E. KAMM, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1530328 *Jun 14, 1921Mar 17, 1925Reiboldt William PApparatus for molding burial vaults
US2218047 *May 2, 1936Oct 15, 1940Nat Casket Company IncHardenable plastic article
US2832995 *Nov 26, 1954May 6, 1958Mel L DeckerApparatus for molding burial vaults
US2963766 *Nov 7, 1957Dec 13, 1960Wallace Metal Products IncCasket
US3164880 *Mar 24, 1961Jan 12, 1965Hotchkiss Bruce MPlastic casket
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3800015 *May 19, 1972Mar 26, 1974Sachs MMethod of forming a block to be used in the construction of a wall
US3810282 *Apr 17, 1972May 14, 1974Hawkeye Machinery CorpBurial device and method for using same
US3811173 *Apr 24, 1972May 21, 1974B BaumannMethod of manufacturing tanks for liquids
US3844003 *Feb 7, 1973Oct 29, 1974Racine Duo Guard IncCombination casket and vault
US4523358 *Feb 23, 1983Jun 18, 1985Casket Shells, Inc.Stamped casket
US6901640Mar 28, 2002Jun 7, 2005Affinity CorporationSealed liner system for interment vessels or containers
EP1625840A2 *Aug 2, 2005Feb 15, 2006KANTERS, Martines Josephus Johanna Caspar MariaCoffin
WO2003082177A1 *Mar 27, 2003Oct 9, 2003Pangeaa Interment SystemsSealed liner system for interment vessels or containers
Classifications
U.S. Classification27/6, 249/142, 249/163, D99/7, 264/46.6, 220/62.22
International ClassificationA61G17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61G17/00, A61G17/0076
European ClassificationA61G17/00