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Publication numberUS3411669 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1968
Filing dateSep 8, 1966
Priority dateSep 8, 1966
Publication numberUS 3411669 A, US 3411669A, US-A-3411669, US3411669 A, US3411669A
InventorsPuster Louis M
Original AssigneeReynolds Metals Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Beverage dispenser regulation and the like
US 3411669 A
Images(7)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1968 L. M. PUSTER BEVERAGE DiSPENSER REGULATION AND THE LIKE Filed Sept. 8, 1966 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. LOUIS M. PUSTER TQI ' ms ATTORNEY? Nov. 19, 1968 I 1.. M. PVUSTE'R BEVERAGE DISPENSER REGULATION AND THE LIKE Fil'ed Sept. a, 1966 7 Shams-Sheet 2 HEE ,ZMW

' HIS ATTOBIZQEX Nov. 19, 1968 1.. M. PUSTER ,5

BEVERAGE DISPENSER REGULATION AND THE LIKE v Filed Sept. 8, 1966 i 7 Sheets-Sheet s IOOAA IIOA FIG-29 MACHINING APPARATUS NTOR.

' INVE LOUIS M. PUSTER BY 2 9 1 z HIS ATTORNEYS v NOV. 19, 1968 PUSTER 3,411,669 1 f BEVERAGE DISPENSER REGULATION AND THE LIKE Filed Sept. 8, 1966 I 7S heets-Sheet 4 234d II? a I 242 {aims I 258 I z 248 y 2:

' INVENTOR. LOUIS M. PUSTER HIS ATTORNEYS Nov. 19, 1968 L. M. PUSTER BEVERAGE DISPENSER REGULATION AND THE LIKE Filed Sept. 8, 1966 I I84 I76 '7 Sheets-Sheet 6 FIG-l9 INVENTOR. LOUIS M. PUSTER HIS ATTORNEYS Nov. 19, 1968 1.. M. PUSTER 3,411,559

BE ERAGE DISPENSER REGULATION AND THE LIKE Filed sept. a, 1966 7 Sheets- Sheet e FIG-23 INVENTOR. Louis M. Puster ms ATTORNEYS F I //l I ll! llll/r FIG-22 Nov. 19, 1968 1... M. PUSTER 3 411569 BEVERAGE DISPENSER REGULATION AND THE LIKE Filed Sept. 8, 1966 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 FIG-25 F lG-ZT 50D 64 soc COLD EXTRUSION MACHINING I APPARATUS APPARATUS r 73 50F [50G H APPARATUS PLUG v INVENTOR ENJSRL [Hg ,!;;3 LOUIS M. PusTEk 50H BY FIG-28 I M HIS ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,411,669 BEVERAGE DISPENSER REGULATION AND THE LIKE Louis M. Puster, Knoxville, Tenn., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Reynolds Metals Company, Henrico County, Va., a corporation of Delaware Continuation-impart of applications Ser. No. 481,656, Aug. 23, 1965, and Ser. No. 551,126, May 26, 1966. This application Sept. 8, 1966, Ser. No. 578,947

23 Claims. (Cl. 222-61) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This application discloses a beverage dispenser having a high pressure gas container supported at one end. The gas container 'has a massive end wall with a homogeneous extruded high pressure liquefied cylindrical gas chamber which has its free end curling inwardly to form a reduced size free'end which receives a sealing plug. The massive end wall has a gas expansion valve with a gas inlet extending toward the hi-gh pressure gas chamber and an expanded discharge outlet discharging into a reduced pressure chamber in said massive end wall. Anexpanded gas check valve is provided in the side of the massive end wall. The gas container is made from an aluminum slug and is formed by cold extrusion and by machining operations into a massive body having an intermediate wall with an expanded gas side in one direction and with a high pressure liquefied side in the opposite direction.

This application is a continuation-in-part of prior applications: SN 481,656, filed Aug. 23, 1965, for Beverage Dispenser Regulation; SN 551,126, filed May 26, 1966, for Presure Regulator Construction, which is a division of SN 426,992, filed Jan. 21,1965 now Patent No. 3,252,622, for Gas Flow Control for Dispensing Apparatus and the Like, which is a continuation-in-part of prior application SN 344,074, filed Feb. 11, 1964 now abandoned, for a Gas Flow Control Dispensing Apparatus; SN 481,658, filed Aug. 23, 1965 now Patent No. 3,347,417, for Charged Liquid Dispenser With Pocketed Gas Container; and SN 558,718 filed June 20, 1966, for Valve Construction and Method.

This inventionre'lates to beverage dispenser regulation.

One of the features of this invention includes a high pressure gas container in which the main cylindrical wall of the container is made by cold extrusion from a slug.

Another feature of this invention includes the closing of the free end of the cylindrical container to provide a reduced size freeend and with a plug at such reduced size free end, which is sealingly secured to seal such free end.

Another feature of this invention includes a construction in which the inlet end of a tube. which is connected to an expansion valve is provided with a restrictor formed by the insertion of a straight sided equilateral restrictor 3,411,669 Patented Nov. 19, 1968 relatively low pressure charging gas into such container as the beer is gradually dispensed, to maintain the gas charge above the beer continuously at the optimum or proper pressure, such as 12 p.s.i.g., if the liquid or beverage to be dispensed is beer. The CO gas, for example, which is introduced may be supplied from a liquid CO container which has a pressure of from 500 to 600 p.s.i.-g. This high pressure gas is expanded through an automatic gas pressure reducing valve from such high 500 to 600 p.s.i.g. pressure to a relatively low 12 psig pressure for use above the beer in the dispensing container. It has been discovered that a sustained rush of high pressure gas, or liquified gas, through the automatic valve is very harmful to the valve and also it has been discovered that high pressure flow from the liquid carbon dioxide container is likely to be interrupted at the dip tube inlet by ice crystal formations and foreign matter collecting over the tube inlet, particularly when the inlet is a single round orifice inlet.

Accordingly, another feature of this invention is to provide in combination with a low pressure gas flow restricting orifice at the discharge side of an automatic pressure regulating valve to a beverage container, the regulating valve on the inlet side connecting with the outlet of a liquified gas or gaseous high pressure container; an improved novel dip tube in the high pressure container having an inlet slot serving as a filter to prevent foreign material from reaching the regulating valve and likewise avoid the usual clogging defects of the single round orifice type of dip tube inlet.

While a charging gas, such as CO has been described in connection with this invention, many of the features of this invention are applicable to other charging and/or propelling gases.

Other features of this invention are apparent from this description, the appended claimed subject matter, and the v accompanying drawings in which:

plug inserted in a cylindrical end portion of such tube through which the high pressure .gas is expanded.

Another feature of this invention includes a poppet check valve construction adjacent an aperture, the poppet check valve having a base which controls the fluid flow through the aperture, said check valve having a poppet check valve stem extending through an opening adjacent the aperture, such stem having an enlargement holding such base operatively over the aperture.

This invention also relates to high pressure gas reduction regulators to provide for dispensing of carbonated beverages from containers at relatively low optimum dispensing pressure.

In dispensing apparatus, such as in a gas charged liquid container for beer or the like, it is desirable to introduce FIGURE 1 is a diagrammatic cross section of a charged liquid container within which is placed a changing high pressure liquified gas container and regulator.

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged cross section, partly broken away, showing details of the charging gas container and regulator.

FIGURE 3 is an end view taken along the line 3-3 of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 4 is a cross section of a check valve construction which discharges expanded gas from the container and regulator into the liquid to be charged.

FIGURE 5 is a view of a portion of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged cross section taken along the line 6-6 of FIGURE 5.

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged cross section taken line 7-7 of FIGURE 5.

FIGURE 8 is an enlarged view of a portion of FIG- URE 7.

FIGURE 9 is a cross section of the cup like cage.

FIGURE 10 is a view from the line 10-10 of FIG- URE 9.

FIGURE 11 is a view from the line 11-11 of FIG- URE 9.

FIGURE 12 is a side elevation of the abutment screw and spring adjusting ring construction.

FIGURE 13 is a cross section of the screw construction of FIGURE 12.

FIGURE 14 is a view from the line 14-14 of FIGURE along the FIGURE 15 is a cross section of the externally threaded ring to hold the cup member of FIGURE 9.

FIGURE 16 is a view taken from the line 16-16 of FIGURE 15.

FIGURE 17 is a cross section of another embodiment of the gas charging means.

FIGURE 18'is a cross section of another embodiment of a charging gas container of this invention.

FIGURE 19 is an end view of the left end of FIGURE 18.

FIGURE 20 is a cross section along the line 20-20 of FIGURE 19.

FIGURE 21 is a diagrammatic cross section, partly in elevation, of another embodiment of a charging container of this invention installed in a beverage container.

FIGURE 22 is an enlarged cross section of a portion of the embodiment shown in FIGURE 21 showing the dip tube with the filter slot formed in the inlet end thereof.

FIGURE 23 is an enlargement of the low pressure restriction orifice portion of FIGURE 22.

FIGURE 24 is an enlarged perspective view of the novel dip tube of FIGURES 21-23 showing the intake end of the tube formed with a slit or elongated slot for filtering gas flow from the CO container or bottle disclosed in FIGURES 21 and 22.

FIGURE 25 is an enlarged cross section of a valve construction which may be used in any of the embodiments herein disclosed.

FIGURE 26 is a top view of the valve and stem shown in FIGURE 25.

FIGURE 27 is a cross section of the valve construction of FIGURE 25, with further enlargement.

FIGURE 28 is a diagrammatic view of apparatus and method for producing the charging gas containers and regulators of FIGURES 2 and 18.

FIGURE 29 is a diagrammatic view of apparatus and method for producing the restrictor plug of FIGURE 8.

Certain words may be used in this specification and in the claimed subject matter which indicate direction, relative position, etc. These words are used for the sake of brevity and clearness. However, it is to be understood that such words are used only in connection with the drawings of this application, and that in actual use, the parts described by such words may have entirely different direction, relative position, etc. Examples of such WOI'dS are vertical, horizontal, upper, lower, etc.

This invention relates to beverage dispenser regulation. For example, a beverage dispenser may include a beverage, or charged liquid, dispenser 20 which may be of a suitable size to be placed in the domestic refrigerator and the like. For example, such dispenser may have a storage capacity of 500 cubic inches of beer, or the like, with a C charged pressure of 13.5 p.s.i.g. (pounds per square inch gauge). The dispenser may have a keglike casing 22 in which the horizontal portion of the casing 22 is provided with a front end wall 24 and a rear end wall 26. The front end wall 24 may be inwardly countersunk and may be provided with a dispensing faucet 28, which is opened by outward movement of the handle 30, and is closed by inward biased movement of the handle 30. A discharge spout 32 dispenses the charged liquid, which may be beer or the like, under control of the handle 30. The faucet 28 may be connected to a supply tube 34, which may have its intake end 36 adjacent the lowest normal portion of the beer space within the casing 22. All of the parts of the faucet 28 may be inside of the rim 38.

The rear end wall 26 may be countersunk within the rim 40, but may be outwardly concave and may be provided with an opening or bung 42 formed by the cylindrical or circular wall 44.

During the filling operations, the beverage dispenser 20 may be supported on the front rim 38, with the longitudinal axis 46 in vertical position, and the beverage or beer may be introduced through the opening 42 in a sufficient amount, so that its normal highest level, when the dispenser is in horizontal position, may be substantially along the line 48.

After the beverage has been delivered in the casing 22, while in vertical position, the regulator housing or CO cartridge 50 may be inserted into the casing 22, with its rim 52 sealed and secured to the circular wall 44 by any well known suitable means, whicli is not part of this invention.

The regulator housing or CO cartridge 50 FIGURES l and 2, may be of unitary construction. An aluminum slug 50A, FIGURE 28, made of commercial aluminum, or of a suitable aluminum alloy may be formed by cold extrusion apparatus 50B, well known in the cold extrusion art, and by machining operations in machining apparatus 50C, well known in the machining art, to form a massive expansion valve and expansion valve chamber supporting body 54 with such body 54 having a substantially frustoconical side surface 136 and an intermediate wall 56 with an expanded gas side 58 directed in one direction, and with a high pressure liquefied :gas side 60 directed in the opposite direction and with a cylindrical, homogeneous high pressure gas chamber forming wall 62 coaxial with and joined substantially at the smaller end said frustoconical side surface 136 with an originally cylindrical free end 64, as shown at 50D, extending from said high pressure liquefied gas side 60.

After the cold extrusion has been performed, a tube receiving opening 66 may be formed or machined in the intermediate wall 56 in the apparatus 50C with said opening 66 coaxial with said frusto-conical side surface and gas chamber forming wall, so that the opening 66 connects the expanded gas side 58 and the high pressure liquefied gas side 60.

The end 64 may be inwardly curled, as at 70', in well known apparatus 50B and a sealing plug 68- may be se cured to the curled free end 72 to seal such end.

For example, a generally frustoconical end sealing plug 68 may be placed in the cylindrical wall 62. Thereafter, the end 64 may be inwardly curled, as at 70, in apparatus 50E, by a press operation, for example, to form a reduced size free end 72.

Thereafter, the plug 68 may be held against the reduced size free end 72 by any suitable holding means passing through the tube receiving opening 66, such as by any suitable rod like tool 73, FIGURE 28, inserted in the receiving opening 74, to hold the plug 68 firmly against the reduced size free end 72 as indicated at 50F.

Thereafter, the plug 68 may be bonded and sealed to the reduced size free end 72 as by welding it at 76 at 506 to=form a weld which secures the plug 68 in place.

This construction provides a flange 78 which takes the outward thrust of the charge pressure, of liquid CO for example, on the outer area of the plug, so that the weld 76 is primarily a seal.

Thereafter, the holding means or tool 73 may then be removed from the tube receiving opening 66 to produce the partially completed container in-diciated at 50H, FIG- URE 28.

Thereafter, an expansion valve supporting tube 80 may be secured in the tube receiving opening 66, by the threaded construction shown at 66 in FIGURE 2.

The tube 80 may have a cylindrical intake end 82 extending toward the high pressure liquefied side 60, said tube having a discharge end 84 extending toward said expanded gas side 58.

An expansion valve 86 may be secured in the supporting tube 80. Such expansion valve may be of the well known tire inflating, check valve, type with an operating stem 88 extending toward said expanded gas side 58 and with a poppet, or valve opening and closing member 90, which is operated by the stem 88, and which poppet 90 extends towards the high pressure liquefied gas side 60. Thereafter, an expanded gas pressure responsive diaphragm 92 may be secured in the massive bod-y 54 adjacent to and actuating the stem 88. The diaphragm 92 may be responsive to the expanded gas pressure on the right side of the diaphragm, and to a combined atmospheric pressure and spring load pressure on the left side (as viewed in FIGURE 2) in a manner more fully explained elsewhere.

A liquefied gas restrictor or filter 94 may be provided adjacent the intake end 82 of the supporting tube 80.

The supporting tube 80 may be secured, so that the intake end 82 is located slightly above the normal highest liquefied gas level 96 in the pressure chamber 98. The restrictor 94 prevents any large slugs of liquefied gas from reaching and harming the poppet 90 of the expansion valve 86.

The liquefied gas restrictor 94 may be formed by inserting a straight sided equilateral restrictor plug 100 in the cylindrical end portion 102 of the supporting tube 80.

The restrictor plug may have its ends tapered at 104 and .106.

The restrictor plug 100 may have the edges 108 of the sides 110 rounded to fit the cylindrical end portion 102.

The liquefied gas restrictor or filter 94 may be made from an equilateral multisided bar 100A, FIGURE 29, such as a square bar of aluminum, such as aluminum alloy 6061- T6 having sides 110A. One end of the bar may be machined in well known machining apparatus 111 to produce the straight sides 110, FIGURE 8, the curved edges 108 and the tapered ends 104 and 106 as previously described. Additionally, such bar may be machined in such apparatus 111, FIGURE 28, to have a cylindrical neck, FIGURE 8, and a circular head 114 to produce the restrictor plug 100. The head 114 may extend into the thicker portion 116 of the tube 80.

For example, the tube 80 may be 1%; inches long from the intake end surface 118 to the discharge end surface 120, FIGURES 5 and 8. The outer diameter of the outer surface v122 may be 0.312 inch. The inner diameter of the thin end portion 102 may be from 2285-2295, while the inner diameter of the thicker part 116 may be from .1835- .1845 inch in diameter, with the surface 134 being at 45. The outer threaded portion 124 may be inch in diameter and the inner thread 126 may be from 180-.185 for out thread and from .l94.l97 for rolled threads. The hexagonal nut 128 may be inch between parallel sides.

The plug 94 may be substantially inch from the surface 130 to the surface 132. The distance between the parallel sides 110 may be from .l885.l865 inch. The diameter of the neck 112 may be .125 inch while the diameter of the head 114 may be from .177-.179 in diameter. The thickness of the head 114 may be from .052.072 and the thickness of the neck 112 may be from .052.072, such thickness being balanced to produce a total inch length of the plug. The tapers 104 and 106 may be at 30 and may be substantially inch long at the maximum distance.

The massive supporting body 54 originally may have been a solid portion of the slug having the tapered frustoconical outer surface walls 136 formed either by extrusion press action, or by machining action, also to provide the cylindrical portions 138 and the rim 52. A cylindrical, expanded gas chamber 140 may be machined coaxially with the tube receiving opening 66 which also has been machined in the body 54. The chamber 140 may terminate in a diaphragm receiving wall 142 which may have the bead receiving groove 144. The diaphragm 92 may be placed adjacent such Wall 142 with the bead of the diaphragm in the :bead receiving groove 144. The periphery of the diaphragm may be held against such wall 142 by means of a cup-like cage 146 which is shown in FIG- URES 2, 3, 9, and 11.

A somewhat cylindrical atmospheric pressure cavity 147 also has been machined in the massive body 54, which includes the threaded wall portion 147 and the slightly greater diameter cylindrical wall portion 147".

The cage 146, FIGURES 9-11, has an outer cylindrical ring like portion 148, the free end of which engages the periphery of the diaphragm 92. The cage 146 also has three longitudinal Walls 150, which are attached to the endwall 152. The longitudinal walls 150 are joined to the ring 148 by the radial walls 154. The longitudinal walls 150 are spaced from each other, to form air and/ or released CO passageways 156.

An externally threaded ring 158 is threaded into the internal threads 147, and pushes the cylindrical ring portion 148 tightly against the periphery of the diaphragm 92. The ring 158 is provided with key engaging slots 160, so that the ring 158 can be keyed tightly to engage against the cylindrical ring portion 148. Such ring 158 is also shown in FIGURES l5 and 16.

An abutment 162, FIGURES 2, 12l4, is provided which may be in the form of a screw having a head 164, which has a rotatable adjusting means or key opening 166, FIGURE 13. Such screw 162 carries an adjustable spring end receiving member in the form of a ring 168 with a flange 170, FIGURE 12. The ring 168 is internally threaded and engages the threads of the screw 162. The small knob 172 on the screw head 164 is received in the opening 174 in the end wall 152 of the cage 146.

The ring 168 and flange 170 form a spring end receiving means, in which one end of the compressing spring 176 is received, as shown in FIGURE 2. The other end of the spring 176 is received in a spring receiving disc 178, which has a groove 180 for receiving the other end of the spring 176. The disc 178 engages the atmospheric side of the diaphragm 92.

The flange 170 is hexagonal in shape with three of its sides fitting and locking against the inner surfaces of the three longitudinal walls of the cage 146. Since the cage 146 is held stationary by the ring 158, rotation of the screw head knob 172 by a knurled tool causes the ring 168 and flange to be adjusted longitudinally to vary the load of spring 17 6.

It is therefore to be seen that the pressure of the spring 176 may be adjusted by rotating the small knob 172 by a knurled end wrench or the like which can be inserted in the opening 166. Rotation of the knob 172 causes the ring 168 and flange 170 to move rightward, or leftward, as the case may be, to increase or decrease the pressure of the spring 176 on the diaphragm 92. Therefore, adjustment of the knob 172 can regulate the responsiveness of the diaphragm 92 to the expanded gas pressure in the chamber 140.

The diaphragm 92 may have a tapered aperture 181 through which excess or undesirably high pressure gas may be discharged from the chamber 140 into the atmosphere through the passageways 156. A poppet valve 182 may have a poppet valve stem 184, which is tapered. The poppet valve 182 also may have a poppet valve base 186 which controls the flow of gas through the aperture 180, virtually to open and close the aperture 180.

The poppet base 186 also engages the expansion valve stem 88, and opens and closes the expansion valve poppet 90 in response to movement of the diaphragm 92.

The poppet valve stem 184 is tapered with decreasing transverse dimension as the distance increases from the base 186. The aperture 181 is tapered with decreasing dimension as the distance increases from the disc when the base has closed on the aperture. The aperture 181 tapers more acutely than the poppet valve stem 184.

The pressure relief poppet valve 182 operates in the following manner. In the event of a higher than normal pressure on the right side of the diaphragm 92, the diaphragm will move to the left, FIGURE 2, and move the relief valve poppet 182 away from the stem 88. The pressure differential across the relief valve 182 will be sufficient to make the poppet 182 follow the diaphragm 92 and maintain tight closure of the poppet valve 182 until the diaphragm has moved far enough so that the stem 184 contacts the end of the adjustment screw 162. Further movement, to the left, of the diaphragm 92 will cause the relief valve 182 to unseat and vent gas through the central aperture 181 in the diaphragm 92. The relief valve 182 is made of a plastic material such as Delrin in order that it may have low thermoconductivity. Since the temperature of the gas escaping may be below 32 F. this inhibits freezing of any moisture that may be present in the valve 182 area. In addition, the stem 184 on the valve 182 is tapered in the direction shown such that any ice formation would be less likely to cause the valve to hang. Also, the aperture 181 in the diaphragm is tapered more acutely in the direction to minimize hang up.

Since the relief pressure is controlled by the amount of movement of the diaphragm from contact with the stem 88 to the end of screw 162 (distance X) the relief pressure will always be a certain pressure above the normal control pressure. For example, it can be chosen to be in the order of to p.s.i. above normal control pressure. With the design as shown, the dimension X (the maximum distance of travel of the point of the stem 184) is small enough that it is not necessary to retain the valve 182 in any manner since it cannot fall out of place even with the diaphragm in the extreme left hand position.

The expanded CO or other gas in the chamber 140 may be discharged into the beverage or other liquid in the casing 22 through an aperture 188, FIGURE 4, and past a check valve 190, which discharges into the beer containing space 191 of the casing 22. Such check valve 190 may be a discharge poppet check valve adjacent the aperture 188 and may have a poppet check valve base 192, which has a resilient rim 194 which seals the aperture 188, when the rim 194 is held against the stationary wall 196, which is part of the wall of the chamber 140. The check valve may also have a poppet check valve stem 198, which has an enlargement 200 which holds the stern 198, and the base 192 operatively and securely in the opening 202, which is adjacent to the aperture 188.

The valve base 192, the stem 198 and the enlargement 200 may all be resiliently and homogeneously joined together, and may be made of any homogeneous resilient material as desired.

The container 98 may be charged with liquid CO through the resilient needle receiving plug 204, FIGURE 2, which has a normally sealed slit or puncture 206 so that the charging needle for liquid CO can be inserted therein. A plate 208 has a needle arresting portion 210, which spaces the gas fiow openings 212. Slanting passageway means 214 may contain a tire inflating type valve 216, with a stem 218 and a poppet 220, so that the liquid gas introduced by the needle may find its way into the container 98.

A rupture disc 222, FIGURE 2, may be held by a resilient O-ring 224, solid ring 226 and threaded ring 228. Any excessive pressure in the chamber 98 will burst the disc 222 and allow the CO to escape. The pressure of any relief means herein shown, such as rupture disc 222, is capable of bursting or breaking the protective plastic cover 230, FIGURE 1, which may have been placed over the end of the circular wall 44.

The ring 228 may have a hexagonal inner surface, so that it may be turned by any hexagonal wrench construction for tightening or removing the parts there held by the ring 228.

Another embodiment of a charging needle receiving construction is shown in FIGURE 17. A gas chargeable container, such as container 98, may have an end wall 232 with a charging needle receiving construction 234. Such construction 234 may be placed in a gas charging passageway 236 with a longitudinal axis transverse to the wall 232. Another conducting passageway 238 may branch obliquely at a branching connection 240 from such charging passageway 236. The branching oblique passageway 238 may discharge into the container 98.

A charging needle receiving resilient plug 242 in such construction 234 may have a needle receiving, normally sealed, central puncture 244.

A needle blocking plate 245 may be placed next to the plug 242 with a gas passage means or holes out of needle alignment with the puncture 244. A transverse wall 250 next to the plate 246 has a central gas conducting passageway 252 with a discharge opening in the flat transverse surface as shown. A resilient O-ring 254 is held against the fiat transverse surface and surrounds the discharge opening 252. A ball shaped check valve 256 engages the O-ring to produce a one way gas flow in the branching passageway 238. The ball 256 may be held against the O-ring by the spring 258.

The gas from the charging needle passes the holes 248, passageway 252, moves and passes the ball 256 and into the passageway 238 and container 98.

If desired, other passageways and valves may be provided in the supporting body 54. For example, a passageway may be provided from the outer surface of the body 54 to the beer containing space 191, as is well known. Such passageway may be provided with a pressure relief blow off valve which opens if the pressure in the space 191 becomes excessive.

FIGURES 18-2O show another embodiment of a charging gas container or CO cartridge 350 which is somewhat similar to CO cartridge 50 of FIGURES 1-17. The container 350 may be used in a beverage or charged liquid dispenser 20 which may be substantially the same as the dispenser 28 of FIGURE 1.

Many of the parts of the cartridge 350 may be substantially the same as the parts previously disclosed in connection with FIGURES l-17.

When the parts are substantially the same as in cartridge 50, sufficient reference numerals identical to those used in connection with FIGURES 1-17 are used in FIG- URES 1820 to identify such parts. Since such identity is obvious in such parts in FIGURES 1820 no repetition of description is made, it being understood that such identity exists.

Where the parts are slightly different from previous corresponding parts new reference numerals are used. Where these parts are still closely similar to such previous corresponding parts, the same numerals are used with the addition of 300. It is to be understood that the similarity is still sufficiently obvious not to require a detailed description. Only such additional description is made as is believed appropriate.

In FIGURES 18-20, the member 327 is a combination of previous members 148 and 158 of FIGURE 2. The member 327 engages the diaphragm 92 at one end and is held in place by the spun flange 329 of the valve chamber supporting body 354.

The rupture disc 323 is similar to the rupture disc 222 of FIGURE 2. However, the disc 323 is tightly and directly clamped by the ring 325.

The intermediate wall 356 is similar to wall 56 of FIG- URE 2. However, the wall 356 has a threaded opening 331 which directly receives the expansion valve 386 that is otherwise similar to expansion valve 86 of FIGURE 2.

In FIGURES 18-20 the supporting tube of FIGURE 2 is omitted.

The pressure chamber 398 may be of smaller size than the pressure chamber 98 of FIGURE 2. The embodiment of FIGURES 1820 is particularly applicable in a dispensing container 20 similar to that shown in FIGURE 1, but the container 20 for the embodiment of FIGURES 1820 may be smaller in size.

The plug 368 is placed on the outer edge of the opening 72, and may be sealed by seal 376 which is similar to seal 76 of FIGURE 2.

The other reference numerals on FIGURES 1820 are the same as used in FIGURES 1-17, and identify parts which are the same as or similar to those disclosed in FIGURES ll7. The structure, operation, and method of making such parts is believed obvious in view of the more detailed description and illustration already given in connection with FIGURES 1-17. Hence no further description is believed necessary.

A low pressure gas charged liquid container 420 may be used, for example, of a size to suitably hold about 500 cu. inches of liquid or beverage to be dispensed, and may be adapted to be placed in a refrigerator, if it is a beverage to be cooled. The container 420 may be circular in cross section.

A liquid dispensing valve or faucet 422 may be provided, which may be opened and closed from time to time, by a suitable actuating handle 424. The faucet 422 may be connected to a conduit 426, which has its intake 428 near the lowest portion of the container 420.

If the liquid to be dispensed from the container 420 is beer, or other CO charged beverage, such beverage may be maintained at a suitable low gas pressure, which may be in the order of 12 p.s.i.g. or any proper pressure required for the particular beverage to be dispensed.

A high pressure propellant or charging gas in a bottle or container 430 may be placed in connection with or in the liquid container 420, so that there is a high pressure propellant gas space 432 inside the container 430, and a low pressure beverage dispensing gas in the liquid space 434 inside the container 420, but outside the container 430.

Automatic low pressure responsive propellant gas expansion means 436 may be provided in a support member 438. The expansion means 436 may have a relatively small, expanded, low pressure, gas chamber 440. A diaphragm 442 may be responsive to the pressure of the expanded low pressure gas in chamber 440. The diaphragm 442 opens a tire inflation and deflation type of valve 444, sometimes known as a Schrader valve, which has a stem 446, which opens the valve 444, when the stem is pressed downwardly, and closes the valve when the stern 446 is released. A thrust button 448 is raised and lowered by the diaphragm 442, so that the thrust button 448 pushes the stem 446 down to open the valve 444 when the gas pressure in the chamber 440 is slightly below the desired pressure, preferably such as 12 p.s.i.g. for beer and which releases the stern 446, when the pressure in the chamber 440 is slightly above the selected pressure, such as 12 p.s.i.g. Any suitable type of pressure range adjustment means, may be provided, such as a spring construction 450. This spring is adjustable, and is provided to adjust and regulate the diaphragm 442 to maintain the pressure in the chamber 440 substantially at 12 p.s.i.g., more or less.

The gas bottle or container 430 may be hermetically connected to the support 438 by the threaded construction 452 formed at the neck of the gas bottle and by the resilient ring construction 454., The gas bottle or container 430, and its support 438, may be secured to the end wall 456 of the container 420 in any suitable hermetic manner, as is illustrated by way of example. The support 438 may have a flange 457 which is held against a resilient O-ring 459, by a split ring 461, see FIGURE 2. The split ring 461 may be expanded and contracted when it is desired to insert, or remove, the container 430 and support 438 into or from the container 420.

High pressure propellant gas intake means, see FIG- URE 22, may be provided in the propellant gas container 430 and may be connected to the expansion means 436. This intake means may include a suitable dip tube, such as an aluminum tube 460 of aluminum alloy 6061-T6, for example, which may be 4 inch in external diameter, .035 inch in wall thickness, and 3 inches in length. Its upper end may have a counterbore concentrically positioned to enclose the inlet 462 of the tire type valve 444 to gas chamber 440 and its lower end may be provided with a high pressure elongated inlet opening or inlet slot 464. The slot 464 may be made by inserting a stainless steel shim of'preferably .003 inch thick (from .002 to .004 inch) with a width of approximately inch into the tube 460. The travel length of the slot may be, for example, /8 to inch in length. The lower end of tube 460 may be flattened by press dies, and the shim may then be removed to produce the slot 464. This slot 464, for example, is of a width about equal to the thickness of the shim, of a length equal to about 7 inch and of a travel into the tube of about A; to 4 inch, which slot is thus of a length many times the width thereof.

The container 430 may be so shaped and proportioned that a charge of from 1 /2 to 2 ounces of liquid may be placed in such container 430, and the level of the liquid CO when quiescent, will be below tube tip slot 464 regardless of the position in which the container 430 is placed and particularly when the container is placed in a horizontal position, as shown in FIGURE 1.

The slot 464 serves to prevent foreign material from reaching the regulation valve 444 and also, because of the elongated opening provided by the length thereof, any ice particles over a portion of the slot will not block off the flow of carbon dioxide through the dip tube 460. In fact any foreign material over a part of the slot will tend to be self-clearing during gas generation in the container 430 so that blocking or clogging of the inlet is eliminated.

However, a sufiicient quantity of high pressure gas may at times rush through the valve 444 into the space 434 of the container 420 or into the atmosphere to abrasively harm the valve 444, unless a restrictive or flow control orifice 470, see FIGURE 23, is also used in combination with the inlet slot 464 to limit or prevent such rush of gas through valve 444 and by the provision of the slot possible foreign material is filtered from the propellant before it reaches the valve 444.

A relatively large cross sectional area, but relatively small volume, passageway means 466 and 468 may connect the low pressure gas regulator chamber 440 and the low pressure gas and liquid space 434 in the container 420. For example, the passageway 466 may be in the order of A; inch diameter, and the passageway 468 may be in the order of .092 to .095 inch in diameter.

The restrictive or flow control orifice 470 comprises a relatively small cross sectional area restricting passageway means with respect to the passageway means 468. For example, the cross sectional area of the flow control orifice 470 for beer may be equal to or the equivalent of an area in the order of .015 to .035 inch in diameter, preferably about .028 inch in diameter and the passageway or bore of orifice 470 may be equal to or the equivalent of inch in length.

This flow control orifice will permit a flow rate of 14 to 20 standard cu. feet per hour of CO when the outlet pressure is zero p.s.i. in the container 420 and 550 p.s.i. in the propellant container 430.

If desired, check valve means 472 may be part of the low pressure propellant gas discharge means. Any type of check valve means may be used. However, for example, a cylindraceous tube may be used, which has two longitudinally extending slits 474, which open when the pressure in the tube 472 is greater than the space outside of the tube and which close when the space outside of the tube is greater than the space inside of the tube. This tube is placed tightly over an extension 476 of the support 438. The tube 472 has a closed bottom 478. A solid cylindrical member 480, which may be made of a suitable aluminum alloy, if desired, is placed in the tube 472, before the tube is attached to the extension 476, so that the member 480 will prevent the tube 472 from collapsing inwardly when excessive pressure is placed upon the outside of the tube 472.

Other valve constructions may be placed in the support 438, which do not directly concern the present invention. For example, a pop-off valve 482 may be placed in the end of the passageway 468 so that the valve will pop-01f whenever the pressure in the space 440 becomes excessive, for example, from p.s.i.g. to 140 p.s.i.g. When such pressure does become excessive, the pop-off valve 482 may open and will allow gas to enter the space 484 and burst a thin plastic cover 486, to allow escape of the excessively high pressure gas to the atmosphere. Another pop-ofl? valve 488 may be provided, which will open when the pressure in the space 434 becomes excessive. When the valve 488 opens, the excessive pressure gas may escape through the passageway and will burst the thin plastic cover 486 to allow escape of the gas to the atmosphere. Other valves may be added to the support 436, such as a gas charging valve and passageway to charge the container 430 with liquid CO which valve is not illustrated, since it does not directly concern this invention. Also, if desired, a rupture disc, not shown, may be provided with passageway means, so that if the pressure in the container 439 becomes excessive, for example, from 2000 p.s.i.g. to 3000 p.s.i.g., the rupture disc will rupture and allow the escape of gas through a passageway somewhat similar to 490 or 484, and will also rupture the cover 486, when the disc also becomes ruptured. The rupture disc is not illustrated, since it does not directly concern this invention.

However, the expanded gas space 44%) and the connected passageways 466, 468 and the like, have a relatively small volume which is quickly filled by expanded gas from the valve without any harmful sustained rush of high pressure gas through the valve 444-.

The passageway 470 performs a restricting action which is an important feature of this invention. This orifice 470 is capable of regulating the maximum rate of flow of CO all the way from the high pressure CO inlet slot 464 in FIGURE 24, into the low pressure beverage space 434 in an effective manner to prevent harmful abrasive action in valve 444. This orifice 470 ordinarily receives CO in gaseous form only, and at a pressure of 12 p.s.i.g., more or less, on the upstream side of the orifice 470 and at a pressure of from atmospheric pressure to 12 p.s.ig. on its downstream side. The downstream pressure is atmospheric, for example, when the beverage container 420, which beverage may be beer or ale, is initially being charged with gas, starting with atmospheric pressure, and the pressure may then gradually increase to substantially 12 psig. when the container beverage space 434 is charged to the desired 12 psig. pressure.

When the container 420 is to be charged at a brewery with beer, the CO container or bottle 430, and the support 438, are withdrawn from the beer container 420. The container 420 is then thoroughly cleaned and then is placed in a vertical position, with the faucet end downward on a suitable support or the like. The desired amount of beer is then introduced at atmospheric pressure into the space 434 through the opening which has been left open by the withdrawal of the container 430 and support 438 from the container 420. Thereafter, a thoroughly cleaned or purged container 430 and support 438 are placed in the liquid container 426 and are sealed thereto by the sealing means which are shown in FIGURE 22. The gas bottle or container 430 is then charged with liquid CO through a liquid charging valve, not shown, which is accessible through a passageway similar to 490, for example, and which has a connecting passageway from the charging valve to the interior of the container 430.

If the liquid CO were first introduced into the purged container 430, without the use of orifice 474 a violent rush of CO would be produced through the tire type valve 444 when it is opened into the expansion chamher 440, through the passageways 466 and 468 and into the relatively large beer space 434 at a harmful rate and an abrasive rate of speed through the valve 444. However, such harmful rush of gas is prevented by the action of the restrictive passageway 470 which becomes effective almost immediately because of its highly restrictive character, whereby only a very small amount of CO can rush through the valve 444 into the relatively small space 440 and into the relatively small volume passageways 466 and 468 and any other relatively small volume passageways that may be connected to the gas chamber 440.

Since the passageway 470 provides a very restrictive action, the pressure in chamber 440 and passageways 466 and 468, quickly reaches 12 p.s.i.g., and then the diaphragm 440 is pushed upward, see FIGURE 22, and the stem 446 is released to close the valve 462, and to stop any further rush of CO which might occur. A continuous unchecked rush of CO through the open valve 444, which would be produced by a continued flow of gas to the rela tively large beer space 434 and if unchecked by the orifice or passage 4'70, would be harmful to the valve 444. This is so, because the flow of CO from a liquid CO source is very abrasive and uncontrollable. However, as has just been described, the orifice or passage 470 insures that a quick rise in pressure in the small volume chamber 440 and passageways 4616 and 468, will take place up to the selected pressure, such as 12 p.s.i.g., and thereafter only a slow and restricted flow of gas through the orifice 470 is maintained, until all of the contents of the beer container 420 gradually reach 12 p.sii.g., the equilibrium or fully charged condition. Thereafter, when beer is withrawn through the faucet 422 from time to time, the orifice 470 allows the diaphragm 442 and the tire type valve 444 to supply CO into the space 434, but never at any excessive rate of flow that might be harmful to the valve 444.

Hence, because of restrictive orifice 470, a restrictive action is placed upon the operation of the valve 444 and diaphragm 442, which prevents high speeds, excessive gas flow in a continuous manner through the valve 444 at all times, even when the container 420 is being charged with beer and CO or when excessive withdrawals of beer are being made at the faucet 422.

The orifice or passage 470 is also effective to prevent harmful and high speed discharge of CO from the gas bottle container 436 into the atmosphere, when the container 430 and support 438 are withdrawn from the container 420, in preparation for recharging of the container 426 with fresh beer.

Thus the novel dip tube 460 with a slot inlet opening 464 in place of a round pin hole form of orifice prevents cut-off of gas flow into the inlet of the tube by foreign matter which sometimes blocks a round pin hole type of dip tube gas inlet orifice. Also, CO ice particles often develop at the orifice on the inlet end of the tube and such ice particles block a single round orifice, thereby causing an objectionable erratic emission of gaseous CO propellant to the regulator chamber 440.

The expansion or inflation check valve 586 may be of inflation valves, such as 214, herein disclosed, may be a tire type inflation check valve 586 with a poppet valve 590 as shown in FIGURES 25, 26 and 27 of this application, which correspond to certain figures in the copendin application, SN 558,718, filed June 20, 1966, for Valve Construction and Method, to which reference is made, if necessary, for a more detailed description thereof.

The expansion or inflation check valve 586 may be any well known tire type of valve having a tubular valve body 501 with a lower cylindrical end or valve seat 503 and an upper screw threaded cap 505 which rotatably engages the upper end 507 of the valve body 501 in a well known manner. Turning of the cap 505 causes the valve body sealing circular bead 509 to seal against the slanting surface 511 of the tubular passageway 513 of the supporting intermediate wall 556 which may be similar to the intermediate walls 56, 356, etc., of any of the embodiments herein disclosed.

The tubular valve body 501 surrounds the valve rod 515 with a lower transverse flange 517 with a lower flat surface 519 which contacts the flat surface 521 of the seal 523.

The poppet valve construction 590 may include the relatively rigid cup 525, with an integral relatively rigid cylindrical tube 527 depending from and connected to the cup 525. Seal member 523 may be hermetically bonded to the interior surface 529 of such cup 525. Such seal member 523 may have a seal elongated opening 531 aligned with and connected to the cylindrical tube 527.

The relatively rigid cup 525 may have a cup side wall 532 and a cup bottom 533. The cup side wall 532 and the cup bottom 533 form a cup interior and an interior cup surface.

The relatively rigid cylindrical tube 527 has a cylinder interior and acylinder side wall. The cylindrical tube 527 is integrally connected to the cup bottom 533. The relatively elastic seal 523 is bonded to the interior cup surface. The seal elongated opening 531 may be a seal cylindrical opening aligned with the interior of tube 527.

The cup 525 and tube 527 may be made of metal. The elastic seal 523 may be a rubber-like plastomer seal, such as a natural rubber seal or a synthetic rubber seal, such as of neoprene or the like. Such plastomer seal may be heat bonded, or vulcanized to such interior cup surface of cup 525, hermetically to seal the upper edge of the seal to the interior of the cup, and the body of the seal to the inner surface of the cup. Such heat bonding may be performed as more fully described in said application, SN 558,718.

The cup 525 and the tube 527 may be made of brass, which provides a particularly effective surface for bonding the seal thereto.

The valve actuating rod 515 extends through the seal cylindrical opening 531 and into the interior of tube 527. The valve rod 515 may be sealingly secured to the tube 527 by downwardly press fitting the rod 515 into the tube 527, with a .003" overage or oversized diameter of the rod 515, as compared to the diameter of the interior surface of tube 527. Such press fit of the rod may be sufficient to provide a sufiiciently tight seal so that high pressure charging fluid cannot flow upwardly between the tube 527 and the rod 515.

The elongated opening 531 of the seal 523 may be slightly smaller in diameter than the diameter of the valve rod 515, such difference being in the order of .003 in diameter.

Such sealing action between the rod 515 and the tube 527 may also be provided by a thermal bond near the lower end of the rod 515, and this may be a soldering bond, brazing bond, or the like.

The sealing action between the rod 515 and the tube 527 may be also provided by forming the transverse flat surface of flange 540 at the lower end of the rod 515, in contact with the lower end of the cylindrical tube 527. Such lower transverse surface or flange 540 may be produced by an upsetting, or pressing action and thereafter the soldering operation may be performed between the surface 540 and the end of tube 527, if that is 'desired.

It has been discovered, by applicant, that because the prior flexible seal, at the rim of the cup, is subject to the high pressure of the unexpanded propellant fluid, such high pressure fluid is likely to enter at the rim of the cup into the space between the interior of the cup and the exterior of the unbonded flexible seal. The CO may be in liquid or frost form in such space. Thereafter, when the environment pressures, or temperatures are varied around the valve, the CO in such liquid or frost form, between the seal and the cup, expands and dislocates the seal sufficiently so that an objectionable leakage of high pres-sure propellant is started near the rim of the cup, down between the seal and the interior of the cup, and then through the low pressure central portion of the seal and up along the actuating rod. This results in a continuous uncontrolled leak from the high pressure propellant container into the low pressure charged liquid container. An inoperative expansion valve construction is thus produced.

According to this invention, the elastic seal is permanently and hermetically bonded to the interior of the cups surface in such amanner that the high pressure propellant fluid cannot enter at the top edge of the seal into the space between the seal and the interior of the cups surface. Hence no such dislocation of the seal can occur, and a superior and longer lasting valve construction is provided.

While the form of the invention now preferred has been disclosed as required by statute, other forms may be used, all coming within the scope of the claimed subject matter which follows.

What is claimed is:

1. A method comprising:

forming a metal slug by extrusion into a massive expansion valve and expansion valve chamber supporting body with a substantially frustoconical side surface and with said body having an intermediate wall with an expanded gas side directed in one direction and with a high pressure liquefied gas side directed in the opposite direction and with a cylindrical, homogeneous, high pressure gas chamber forming wall coaxial with and joined to said body at the smaller end of said frustoconical side surface and with a free end extending from said high pressure liquefied gas side;

forming a valve receiving opening in said intermediate wall coaxial with said frustoconical side surface and gas chamber for forming wall connecting said expanded gas side and said high pressure liquefied gas side;

inwardly curling said free end to form a reduced size free end;

sealing said reduced size free end;

securing an expansion valve in said valve receiving opening with a valve discharge end toward said expanded gas side and with a valve intake end toward said high pressure liquefied gas side with an operating stem extending toward said expanded gas side and with a valve opening and closing member 0perated by said stern and extending toward said high pressure liquefied gas side;

and securing an expanded gas pressure responsive diaphragm in said massive body adjacent to and actuating said stem.

2. A method according to claim 1 in which a liquefied gas restrictor is provided adjacent said valve opening and closing member.

3. A method according to claim 1 in which said valve intake end is secured so that said intake end is located above the normal highest liquefied gas level in said high pressure chamber.

4. A method according to claim 1 in which said metal slug is subjected to an extrusion step to form said intermediate wall and said cylindrical homogeneous high pressure gas chamber forming wall.

5. A method according to claim 2 in which said liquefied gas restrictor is formed by inserting a straight sided equilateral restrictor plug in a cylindrical end portion of a restricting tube.

6. A method according to claim 5 in which said restrictor plug previously has its ends tapered.

7. A method according to claim 6 in which said restrictor plug previously has the edges of its sides rounded to fit in said cylindrical end portion.

8. A method according to claim 7 in which said restrictor plug previously has its ends tapered and previously has the edges of its sides rounded to fit in said cylindrical end portion.

9. A method according to claim 8 in which said restrictor plug has previously been formed from an equilateral bar and has had a cylindrical neck and a cylindrical head formed at the end of said restrictor plug and has said head inserted in a reduced diameter portion of said tube.

10. In combination:

a massive extruded expansion valve and expansion valve chamber supporting body with a substantially frustoconical side surface and with said body having an intermediate wall with an expanded gas side directed in one direction and with a high pressure liqueled gas side directed in the opposite direction and with a cylindrical homogeneous high pressure gas chamber forming wall coaxial with and joined to said body at the smaller end of said frustoconical 15 side surface and with a free end extending from said high pressure liquefied gas side;

said intermediate Wall having a valve receiving opening coaxial with said frustoconical side surface and gas chamber forming wall connecting said expanded gas side and said high pressure liquefied gas side;

said free end having an inward curl to form a reduced size free end, and said reduced size free end being sealed;

an expansion valve in said valve receiving opening with a valve discharge end toward said expanded side and with a valve intake end toward said liquefied gas side, with an operating stem extending toward said expanded gas side and with a valve opening and closing member operated by said stem and extending toward said high pressure liquefied gas side;

and an expanded gas pressure responsive diaphragm in said massive body adjacent to and actuating said stem.

11. A combination according to claim in which a liquefied gas restrictor is provided adjacent said valve opening and closing member.

12. A combination according to claim 10 in which said valve intake end is secured so that said intake end is located above the normal highest liquefied gas level in said high pressure chamber.

13. A combination according to claim 10 in which said supporting body has been formed from a metal slug which has been subjected to an extrusion step to form said intermediate wall and said cylindrical homogeneous high pressure gas chamber forming wall.

14. A liquefied gas restrictor including a straight sided equilateral restrictor plug inserted in a cylindrical end portion of a restricting tube, said plug having tapered ends, having its sides rounded to fit in said cylindrical end portion, and having a cylindrical neck and a cylindrical head formed at the end of said restrictor plug and having said head inserted in a reduced diameter portion of said tube.

15. In combination:

a relatively high pressure gas container;

means forming a discharge passage from said container;

a gas expansion valve in said discharge passage;

an expansion valve stem to open and close said valve and extending outwardly from said passage;

means forming an expanded gas chamber at said discharge passage;

a diaphragm responsive to expanded gas pressure in said expanded gas chamber and having a discharge aperture in said diaphragm;

a poppet valve having a poppet valve stem extending through said discharge aperture and having a poppet valve base opening and closing said aperture and engaging said expansion valve stem;

an abutment means engaged by said poppet valve stem;

said abutment means carrying an adjustable spring end receiving member;

a pressure spring engaging said end receiving member and said diaphragm to regulate the responsiveness of said diaphragm to said expanded gas pressure;

said poppet valve stem being tapered with decreasing transverse dimension as the distance increases from said base;

and said aperture being tapered as the distance increases from said base when said base has closed said aperture.

16. A combination according to claim in which said aperture tapers more acutely than said poppet valve stem.

17. A combination according to claim 15 in which said abutment means includes a screw having a head and a rotatable adjusting ring and flange on said screw receiving one end of a pressure spring, and in which the other end of said spring actuates said diaphragm to regulate the responsiveness of said diaphragm to said expanded gas pressure.

18. A combination according to claim 17 in which a cage engages said head and the periphery of said diaphragm and has passageway means connected to the surrounding atmosphere.

19. A combination according to claim 18 in which said cage holds said ring and flange rotationally fixed but longitudinally movable, and in which means are provided for adjustatbly rotating said screw and head to adjust said ring and flange longitudinally to vary the spring load on said diaphragm to vary the responsiveness of said diaphragm to said expanded gas pressure.

20. In combination:

means forming a fluid chamber and having a discharge aperture;

a discharge poppet check valve adjacent said aperture and having a poppet check valve base opening and closing said aperture and having a poppet check valve stem extending through an opening adjacent said aperture and having an enlargement holding said base operatively over said opening said poppet check valve stem and said poppet check valve base being resiliently and homogeneously joined together.

21. A method comprising:

extruding a metal slug into a massive valve supporting body with said body having a main transverse wall with a low pressure side directed in one direction and with a high pressure gas side directed in the opposite direction and With a cylindraceous, homogeneous, high pressure gas chamber forming wall with a free end extending from said high pressure gas side;

forming a valve receiving opening in said transverse wall connecting said low pressure side and said high pressure gas side;

inwardly curling said free end to form a reduced size free end;

sealing said free end;

securing a valve in said valve receiving opening with a loW pressure valve end toward said low pressure side and with a high pressure valve end toward said high pressure gas side, with a valve supporting stem extending toward said low pressure side and with a valve opening and closing member connected to said stem and extending toward said high pressure gas side;

and securing valve operating means in said massive body adjacent to said stem.

22. In combination:

a massive valve supporting body with said body having a main transverse extruded wall with a low pressure side directed in one direction and with a high pressure gas side directed in the opposite direction and with an extruded cylindraceous, homogeneous, high pressure gas chamber forming wall with a free end extending from said high pressure gas side;

said transverse wall having a valve receiving opening connecting said low pressure side and said high pressure gas side;

said free end having an inward curl to form a reduced size free end, said reduced size free end being sealed;

a valve in said valve receiving opening with a first valve end toward said low pressure side and with a second valve end toward said high pressure gas side, with a valve supporting stem extending toward said low pressure side and with a valve opening and closing member connected to said stem and extending toward said high pressure side;

and valve opertaing means in said massive body adjacent to said stem.

23. A combination according to claim 22 in which said valve opening and closing member comprises a relatively rigid cup with an integral relatively rigid cylindrical tube depending from and connected to said cup, and a relatively elastic seal member bonded to the interior of the cup, and having a seal elongated opening aligned with and connected to said cylindrical tube, and with said supporting stem sealingly extending through said seal elongated opening and into said cylindrical tube.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Brombacher 239552 Franck 29422 X Goldwater 1375 12.15 Ebbets 29475 Temple.

Branning 29479 X Law 29479 X l8 Chute et a1. 239552 X Wentz et a1. -1 222,--396 Reip 239-552 Lawrence et al 22252 X Wilson 22252 Wilson 222396 Miller et a1 22252 Pratt 137234.5 X Puster 22252 10 ROBERT B. REEVES, Primary Examiner.

N. L. STACK, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3508569 *Aug 23, 1965Apr 28, 1970Puster Louis MBeverage dispenser regulation
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/61, 222/399, 29/422, 137/512.15, 222/397, 138/40
International ClassificationB67D1/04, B67D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/0412
European ClassificationB67D1/04B