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Publication numberUS3411689 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1968
Filing dateOct 24, 1965
Priority dateOct 24, 1965
Publication numberUS 3411689 A, US 3411689A, US-A-3411689, US3411689 A, US3411689A
InventorsBrackett John C
Original AssigneeWaldorf Paper Prod Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reinforced corrugated paperboard and product
US 3411689 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 19, 1968 J, Q TT 3,411,689

v REINFORCED CORRUGATED PAPERBOARD AND PRODUCT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 24, 1965 INVENT OR lrzrr v Jon 6. Blue I A ORNEY N v-19 1368 I J. c. BRACKETT 3,411 689 REINFORCED CORRUGATED PAPERBOARD AND PRODUCT Filed on. 24, 1965 ZSheets-Sheet 2 v INVE'NTOR JOHN C. BRACKET? United States Patent 3,411,689 REINFORCED CORRUGATED PAPERBOARD AND PRODUCT John C. Brackett, St. Paul, Minn., assignor to Waldorf Paper Products Company, St. Paul, Minn., a corporation of Minnesota Filed Oct. 24, 1965, Ser. No. 504,575

, 3 Claims. (Cl. 229-3.5)

ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates to a means of reinforcing corrugated paperboard, and the product produced thereby. Single face corrugated paperboard is formed, and then elongated strips of thermoplastic material are dropped into the valleys formed between the corrugations of spaced intervals. The second liner is adhered to the corrugated medium toenclose the strips. The double face corrugated board is heated to dry the adhesive and render the reinforcing strips tacky to adhere to the corrugated medium. The corrugated paperboard may then be creased transversely of the flutes While the thermoplastic material is soft, and made into container blanks.

This invention relates to an improvement in reinforced corrugated paperboard and to a method of making the same.

Reinforced corrugated paperboard is oftentimes used for containing products which are heavy, and yet which are incapable of withstanding compressive force, and as a result the containers tend to bulge when they are stacked one upon another. An object of the present invention resides in providing a means of stiffening corrugated paperboard so that it is capable of withstanding greater compressive force.

Certain types of plastic are capable of withstanding considerable compressive force, particularly when held from bending. I have found that by forming narrow strips of such plastic, and dropping them into the flutes of the corrugated board at intervals, the board formed is materially stiffened. This is particularly true if the plastic is of a type which softens with heat and is capable of bonding two of the corrugated mediums when subjected to heat.-

In the format1ion of double-faced corrugated board which includes a corrugated medium sandwiched between a pair of paper liners, the combined web is normally directed over a series of heating plates to dry the adhesive. These plates are normally heated to a high temperature by steam under pressure. I found that if narrow strips of plastic are fed between the flutes of the corrugated medium before the medium is attached to the second liner, the plastic may bond to the medium as the web passes over the heating plates. As a result, certain of the flutes of the corrugated board are partially filled with plastic, which is held firmly in place by being bonded to the paperboard. The resulting corrugated board is much stiffer than normal corrugated board in a direction parallel to the flutes. At the same time, the paperboard may be creased in the usual manner to form corrugated containers.

Corrugated container blanks are usually formed with the corrugations extending vertically with the fold lines connecting the side walls of the container to the closure flaps extending transversely of the corrugations. These two fold lines are normally formed on the corrugator and while the paperboard is still in a heated condition from the heating plates. As a result, the creases which extend transversely of the reinforcing strips are applied while the plastic is still warm and in a pliable condition, simplifying the creasing operation.

"ice

These and other objects and novel features of the present invention will be more clearly and fully set forth in the following specification and claims.

In the drawing a part of the specification, FIGURE 1 diagrammatically illustrates the starting end of a corrugating apparatus showing the manner in which single face corrugated paperboard is produced.

FIGURE 2 is, in effect, a continuation of FIGURE 1 showing the manner in which the single face corrugated paperboard is combined with the second liner and diagrammatically illustrates a cutter from forming narrow strips of plastic to be incorporated in the paperboard.

FIGURE 3 shows the manner in which the corrugated strips are dropped into the flutes of the corrugated board.

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view, in exaggerated s-ize, showing the finished corrugated board.

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view showing a container formed of the corrugated board.

The drawings show diagrammatically an apparatus for forming corrugated paperboard. The apparatus differs from conventional apparatus only in the fact that the second liner is adhered to the upper surface of the single face corrugated web rather than to the undersurface thereof to facilitate the feeding of the thermoplastic material between the flutes of the single face corrugated board. Conventional equipment may be used if a different means of positioning the thermoplastic material in the flutes is employed.

In the arrangement illustrated, the numeral 9 indicates the roll of corrugating medium the web 10 from which is directed between a pair of corrugated rolls 11. Adhesive is applied to the flutes of the corrugated medium as indicated at 12. A roll of liner 13 is pivotally supported as indicated at 14, and the liner 15 is guided by suitable rollers 16 around a pressure roll 17 which applies the liner 15 to the corrugated medium 10. The single face corrugated web thus formed is then normally festooned upon a conveyor 19 where the adhesive is allowed to partially dry.

As indicated in FIGURE 2 of the drawing, the single face corrugated web 20 is directed by guide rollers such as 21 beneath a cutter unit 22 which cuts off narrow strips 26 of thermoplastic from a web 23 which may 'be fed from a roll 24 pivotally supported at 25. The narrow strips 26 of thermoplastic material are dropped upon the surface of the single face corrugated web 20 and means 27 are provided for straightening the strips 26 and insuring their entry into one of the flutes of the corrugated medium. Adhesive is applied to the flutes of the single face corrugated web 20 by an adhesive applicator 29. A second Web of liner 30 is fed from a roll 31 pivotally supported at 32, and the web 30 is adhered to the surface of the flutes of the corrugated medium. The corrugated web thus formed is heated by passing over a series of heating plates 33 which are normally heatedto a high temperature by steam under pressure.

FIGURE 3 of the drawings discloses in greatly enlarged form the thermoplastic strips 26 lying in certain of the flutes of the corrugated web. The spacing between the strips determines, to some extent, the amount of reinforcing obtained. As the web of the corrugated paperboard passes over the plates 33, the thermoplastic is heated to the extent necessary to soften it, and to cause it to bond to the corrugated medium. If the thermoplastic strips are applied on the conventional apparatus, the thermoplastic may bond to the bottom liner as Well as, or instead of, the corrugated medium. In any event, the thermoplastic strips are bonded in position.

The corrugated web is normally cut into sheets at the end of the corrugating apparatus and the web is usually creased if the sheets are to be used to form corrugated containers. When removed from the corrugator, the sheets are normally at an elevated temperature. While the sheets can be readily handled, they are at a temperature which is substantially higher than room temperature. Thus the thermoplastic material is still in a relatively soft condition at the time the web passes between the creasing rollers, thereby facilitating the creasing operation.

The length of the strips of thermoplastic material may be varied. For example, where the strips are to reinforce the corrugated board to provide additional stacking strength, it is only necessary that the strips be of suflicient length to extend between the crease line connecting the walls of the container to the closing flaps. FIGURE 5 of th drawings shows a conventional container A having side walls such as 35 and opposed end walls such as 35 and opposed end walls such as 36. The walls are provided with closure flaps, two of which are indicated at 37. The reinforcing strips 26 are shown in dotted outline extending vertically of the side and end walls as well as across the closure flaps.

In accordance with the patent statutes, I have described the principles of construction and operation of my improvement in reinforced corrugated paperboard and the method of making the same; while I have endeavored to set forth the best embodiment thereof, I desire to have it understood that obvious changes may be made within the scope of the following claims without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim:

1. A reinforced corrugated sheet comprising:

(a) a corrugated medium,

(b) liners adhered to opposite sides thereof,

(c) stiffening strips partially filling certain of the flutes of the corrugated medium,

(d) said strips being of thermoplastic plastic material,

(e) said strips being at least partially adhered to said corrugated medium.

2, A container blank comprising a corrugated sheet including a corrugated medium and liners adhered to opposite sides of the flutes thereof, performed stiffening strips of thermoplastic plastic material partially filling certain of the flutes at space intervals and bonded to said corrugated medium, creases in said sheet and strips extending transversely of said corrugations in spaced parallel relation, right angularly extending spaced creases dividing the length of the blank into side :and end wall panels, and slots aligned with said last named creases extending from said first named creases and the edges of the sheet, dividing the portions of the sheet outwardly of said first named creases into closure flaps.

3. A reinforced container including a corrugated sheet including a corrugated medium, and liners adhered to opposite surfaces thereof, the sheet being cut and creased to provide opposed side walls and opposed end walls connected in tubular relation, closure flaps hingedly connected to said side and end walls and preformed stiffening strips of thermoplastic plastic material partially filling certain of the flutes of the corrugated medium and bonded thereto, said strips having creases in registry with the creases of the sheet, the strips extending in spaced relation throughout at least the area between the hinge lines connecting said walls to said closure flaps.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 990,299 4/1911 Schlisske 161-137 1,425,914 8/1922 Swift 161-137 X 1,730,090 10/1929 OBrien. 1,914,845 6/1933 Cook 2293.S X 2,109,558 3/1938 Waters 2293.5 X 2,192,516 3/1940 Cunnington 161137 X 2,534,201 12/1950 I-Iutter 2293.5 2,973,295 2/1961 Rodgers l61--137 X 2,983,636 5/1961 Runton.

3,158,073 11/ 1964 Rumberger.

3,240,845 3/ 1966 Vorlker 2293.5 X

2,748,048 5/1956 Russell 161133 3,307,994 3/1967 Scott 156-210 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,025,540 1/ 1953 France.

DAVIS T. MOORHEAD, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3967023 *Jan 8, 1975Jun 29, 1976Moeller-Werke GmbhAccordion-pleated article of manufacture
US5085367 *May 3, 1991Feb 4, 1992Ronald CarstensCorrugated cardboard boxes with increased compression strength
US5285957 *Jan 26, 1993Feb 15, 1994The Mead CorporationRepulpable, reinforced corrugated containers
US7368159Sep 6, 2001May 6, 2008International Paper CompanyReinforcing strips for corrugated paperboard and related method and apparatus for its manufacture
US8317671Apr 27, 2000Nov 27, 2012Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Paperboard cartons with laminated reinforcing ribbons and method of making same
US8403819Jan 8, 2007Mar 26, 2013Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Paperboard cartons with laminated reinforcing ribbons and transitioned scores and method of making same
US8403820Jan 28, 2008Mar 26, 2013Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Paperboard cartons with laminated reinforcing ribbons and transitioned scores and method of making same
US20050045271 *Aug 30, 2003Mar 3, 2005Hunter Robert J.Method of producing reinforced cartons
US20060000544 *Feb 17, 2004Jan 5, 2006Riverwood International CorporationMethod of producing cartons
US20070137771 *Jan 8, 2007Jun 21, 2007Zoeckler Michael DPaperboard Cartons With Laminated Reinforcing Ribbons And Transitioned Scores And Method Of Making Same
US20080119343 *Jan 28, 2008May 22, 2008Zoeckler Michael DPaperboard Cartons with Laminated Reinforcing Ribbons and Transitioned Scores and Method of Making Same
US20080318007 *Jan 14, 2008Dec 25, 2008Curtis SmithReinforcing strips for corrugated paperboard and related method and apparatus for its manufacture
US20090004439 *Jan 14, 2008Jan 1, 2009Curtis SmithReinforcing strips for corrugated paperboard and related method and apparatus for its manufacture
US20140183253 *Dec 28, 2012Jul 3, 2014Howard RappReinforce corrugated cardboard box
EP0609067A2 *Jan 26, 1994Aug 3, 1994The Mead CorporationRepulpable reinforced corrugated containers
WO1992019503A1 *Feb 14, 1992Nov 12, 1992Key Tech CorpCorrugated cardboard boxes with increased compression strength
WO1994016881A1 *Jan 25, 1994Aug 4, 1994Mead CorpRepulpable, reinforced corrugated containers
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/132, 156/210, 229/199
International ClassificationB31F1/28, B31F1/20
Cooperative ClassificationB31F1/2886
European ClassificationB31F1/28K