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Publication numberUS3414087 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 3, 1968
Filing dateApr 3, 1967
Priority dateApr 3, 1967
Publication numberUS 3414087 A, US 3414087A, US-A-3414087, US3414087 A, US3414087A
InventorsSchmiesing Gregory E
Original AssigneeGregory E. Schmiesing
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Auxiliary lift apparatus
US 3414087 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1968 I 3. E. SCHMIESING 3,414,087

AUXILIARY LIFT APPARATUS Filed April 5, 1967 2 Sheets-Sheet-l FIG-l INVENTOR GREGORY E. SCHMIESING BYM M ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,414,087 AUXILIARY LIFT APPARATUS Gregory E. Schmiesing, RR. 1, New Bremen, Ohio 45869 Filed Apr. 3, 1967, Ser. No. 627,950 13 Claims. (Cl. 187-11) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Auxiliary Lift Apparatus for use in supplementing the available lift capacity of a powered unit such as a fork lift truck characterized by a uniquely mounted lift device which incorporates novel means for deriving its own power from a conventionally powered lift unit.

This invention relates to lift apparatus and, more particularly to an improved auxiliary lift unit rendered operactive by an interconnection thereof to the lifting elements of a self-powered lift unit. Though not so limited, for purpose of illustration it will be here described in reference to a work-type lift.

Portable lift devices such as fork lift trucks are well known in the material handling art as being admirably suited for dock and warehouse use. Their acquisition and use, however, does present some problems. Their initial cost is relatively high and they do have limited load capacity. Moreover, in some instances, to maintain their stability in handling bulky objects they must be worked in pairs. In this last respect, to the extent that conventional work lift trucks or other such devices have heretofore been used in cooperating pairs, it has proven extremely difficult, for example, to achieve .a synchronized lift operation and a proper balance of the applied loads.

The preceding problems clearly indicate the need for a relatively inexpensive medium for expanding the utility and effectiveness of the available conventionally powered fork lift unit. The present invention answers this need. It affords apparatus which is per se devoid of power but which is simply and economically designed to couple to a conventional lift unit and be rendered capable thereby of serving equally as well, either independently or in conjunction therewith.

It is therefore a primary object of the invention to provide auxiliary lift apparatus which is economical to fabricate, most efiicient and satisfactory in use, adaptable to .a wide variety of applications and unlikely to malfunction.

A further object of the invention is to provide unique lift apparatus for economically supplementing the lifting capacity of available convetionally powered lift units.

Another object of the invention is to economically and simply achieve synchronized portable lift apparatus capable of handling large and bulky loads.

An additional object of the invention is to provide simple .portable means for creating a maximal material handling capacity .at a minimal cost.

Another object of the invention is to provide auxiliary lift apparatus for supplementing available load capacity possessing the advantageous structural features, the inherent lmeritorious characteristics and the means and mode of use herein described.

With the above and other incidental objects in view as will more fully appear in the specification, the invention intended to be protected by Letters Patent consists of the features of construction, the parts and combinations thereof, and the mode of operation as hereinafter described or illustrated in the accompanying drawings, or their equivalents.

Referring to the accompanying drawing wherein is 'ice shown one but obviously not necessarily the only form of embodiment of the invention:

FIG. 1 is a perspective elevation view of auxiliary lift apparatus in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention as connected in tandem with a conventional self-powered fork lift truck unit, the structure being shown in a general schematic or diagrammatic fashion;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective view of a fragment of the upper portion of the auxiliary lift apparatus shown in FIG 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary view taken in perspective illustrating a modification of the structure shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an elevation view illustrating a further embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary view of a portion of the auxiliary lift apparatus of FIG. 4.

Like parts are indicated by similar characters of reference throughout the several views.

Referring to FIG. 1 of the drawings, the invention auxiliary lift apparatus 10 there shown is schematically illustrated as used in conjunction with and as a supplement to a conventional battery powered lift truck 11. The latter has been detailed and will be described only to the extent necessary for an understanding of the present invention.

The truck 11 includes a housing 12 for its battery powered drive and lift mechanism (not shown). The housing 12 projects vertically of a base 13, the latter including a pair of forwardly projected transversely spaced finger portions 14. Power driven wheels (not shown) are partially enclosed within the housing 12 to project therefrom, through and below the underlying base 13. A wheel 15 mounts in underlying relation to the forward extremity of each of the finger portions 14. The power driven wheels projected from the housing 12 together with the transversely spaced wheels 15 lend both mobility and stability to the lift truck 11.

Mounted to the forward face of the housing 12 to project vertically of the base 13, immediately to the rear of the finger portions 14, are a pair of transversely spaced channel members 16. Bridged at their upper extremities by a bracing channel member 17, the members 16 are open to their facing sides and contain therein, in a conventional manner, suitable lift mechanism. The latter interconnects with and supports a fork plate 18 the lower edge of which mounts forwardly projected laterally spaced lift arms 19. The arms 19 lie in a common plane parallel to the base 13 and respectively position in a vertically aligned relation to one of the finger portions 14.

Raising and lowering of the fork plate 18 is a powered operation, under the influence of the aforementioned lift mechanism and suitable controls therefor which are embodied in the housing 12. It should be noted that the truck 11 may be locked in place during a raising or lowering of the lift arms by a manipulation of the brake pedal 20, locking the drive wheels in a conventional manner. Thus the truck 11 is self-powered apparatus capable of being operated to move under its own power from place to place and, where desired, being locked in place. Further, it has means for energizing the lift arms 19 to engage and lift or lower a load as needs require. However, in and of itself it has a working capacity limited by its size and configuration.

By coupling with the truck 11 the auxiliary lift apparatus 10, one can simply and economically achieve an essentially doubled capacity and a greater versatility in use thereof. In the coupling of the lift apparatus, as seen in FIG. 1 of the drawings, a bracket plate 21 is made fast to the lower edge of the fork plate 18, centered between the lift arms 19. The bracket 21 mounts a pair of closely spaced anchor elements 22 and 23. Respectively interconnecting with the anchor elements 22 and 23 are the corresponding ends of the control cables 24 and 25 for the lifting components of the auxiliary apparatus 10. In the example illustrated the cables extend downward in a generally vertical, closely spaced, parallel relation to pass, respectively, under small pulleys 26 and 27 rotating on a bracket 28. The latter is fixed at the forward edge of the base 13, between the finger portions 14.

Turning for the moment to the construction of the auxiliary lift apparatus 10, the body thereof consists of an open rectangular frame comprising a transverse base bar 29 interconnecting the lower ends of vertically projecting, transversely spaced, U-shaped channel members 30 which open at their adjacent sides. The upper extremities of the channel members 30 are interconnected by a channel-shaped brace bar 31 which is parallel to the base element 29. As shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings, spaced apart leg elements 32 and 33 project forwardly of the respective ends of the base element 29, in a plane common thereto and generally common to the base 13 of the lift truck 11. Moreover, the legs 32 and 33 are respectively in line with one of the channel members 30 and each mounts under its projected extremity a wheel 34.

The base bar 29 mounts a pair of brackets 35 and 36 which are transversely spaced apart to a greater degree than the pulleys 26 and 27 and centered between the channel members 30. The brackets 35 and 36 respectively mount pulleys 37 and 38. Observing FIG. 1 of the drawings, it may be seen that in coupling of the apparatus 10 and 11 the cables 24 and 25 extend forwardly from the pulleys 26 and 27 in a uniform diverging relation to the pulleys 37 and 38 which are anchored to the base bar 29. From this point the cables extend around the pulleys to pass upwardly in a spaced parallel relation between the channel members 30. Adjacent the upper extremities of the channel members 30 the cables 24 and 25 respectively pass over pulley members 39 and 40 which respectively mount to brackets 50 fixed to the upper transverse brace member 31.

Slidably interengaged in the channel portions of the vertical members 30 are guides 41 which project to have portions thereof fixedly mount a plate 42 disposed transversely of the channel members 30 and outwardly of the face thereof remote from the leg portions 32 and 33 of the auxiliary framework above described. Projected outwardly in parallel relation from the respective ends of the plate 42, in the direction of the lift truck 11, are plates 43 which bearingly support a shaft 44, the ends of which project therethrough. Immediately outward of one plate 43 the shaft 44 mounts a ratchet wheel 45 a tooth of which is normally engaged by an adjacent pawl 46 which is also mounted to the adjacent plate 43. It will be seen from FIG. 2 of the drawings that subsequent to their passage over the pulleys 39 and 40, the cables 24 and 25 turn downwardly to wrap around the shaft 44 and eventually have their extremities anchor thereto. In the example illustrated it may be seen that a pair of fork-type lift arms 47 connect to and project outwardly from the plate 42 for movement in unison therewith.

The projected extremity of the shaft 44 adjacent the ratchet 45 mounts a crank arm 48. It should be obvious, with reference to FIG. 2, that the crank arm 48 may be adjusted to turn the shaft 44 to selectively tension the cables 24 and 25 as needs require, for a fine adjustment and levelling of the lift arms 47.

The construction and arrangement of the demonstrated parts of the auxiliary lift apparatus accordingly is one in which the lift arms 47 are caused to be raised and lowered in reference to the related frame including channel members 30 in response to and in correspondence with the raising and lowering movements of the fork lift plate 18 on the lift truck 11. When the apparatus is used together, as seen in FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings, as the plate 18 moves upward, it correspondingly imposes an upward pull on the cables 24 and 25 which is directly reflected in an upward pull on the shaft 44 and thereby on the lift arms 47. The weight of the lift means comprising the arms 47 is such as to keep the cables 24 and 25 tensioned. Similarly, a lowering of the fork plate 18 and the arms 19 relaxes the tension of the cables 24 and 25 and provides for the corresponding descent of the lift arms 47 under the influence of gravity. Due to the secure wrap of the cables 24 and 25 to the shaft 44 there is substantially a precise following of the arms 47 as referenced to the movements of the arms 19. Should slight adjustment be necessary, one need only operate the crank 48 for any desired relative adjustment of the arms 47, the element 46 being adapted for disengagement from the ratchet wheel 45 in the event such should prove necessary. This latter adjustment is of course independent of the raising or lowering of the lift arms 47 in following relation to the arms 19.

In the embodiment illustrated, the apparatus 10 and 11 is shown as used in tandem to provide for handling of a large bulk load. In this instance a platform is established between and in interrelated relation to the lift arms 19 and 47. The platform comprises two sets of telescoping channel bars 51 and 52. At its one end each channel member 51 receives therein a lift arm 47 which is releasably fixed thereto by suitable attachment means 53. At its other end, each bar 51 telescopically nests in the outer free end of a channel member 52 the opposite end of which telescopically accommodates therein a lift arm 19 to which it is fixed similarly to the manner that the channel members 51 are fixed to the lift arms 47. In interengagement of the channel members 51 and 52 their open sides are disposed in opposing relation and the channel members 52 mount interiorly thereof rollers 54 to provide a sliding bearing for the nested portions of the related channel member 51. This last structure facilitates a relative longitudinal sliding motion and adjustment of the sets of channel members 51 and 52. By virtue of such permitted motion the lift devices 10 and 11 may approach or withdraw from one another to thus lengthen or shorten the intermediately disposed platform as and when the character of the load requires. Suitable means, not shown, are used to fix the channel members 51 and 52 in their selected position of adjustment. With relative adjustment of the channel members there is of course a corresponding adjustment of the length of the control cables through the medium of the crank 44.

The lift truck 11 has been described as battery operated. The invention is not, of course, limited to use of the apparatus 10 with a battery operated device. Such device could be powered in any conventional manner and even be capable of being manually rolled on its supporting wheels. Further, a plate 18 could be powered by any suitable known mechanism.

In the use of an embodiment of the invention as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings, the devices 10 and 11 are movable substantially as a unit to and from a place of loading and unloading. However, attention is directed to the fact that the apparatus 10 may be coupled for conjoint use with the lift truck 11 in a relatively independent fashion in absence of the platform defined by the members 51 and 52. In such instance, as illustrated in FIG. 1 of the drawings, stabilizing legs 32' and 33 may be mounted to project oppositely from the legs 32 and 33 at the base of the auxiliary frame.

In any event, it may be seen how simply an auxiliary unit may be contrived which may supplement an available powered lift truck. Thus, one can achieve a substantial increase in available material handling capacity of this character without the need for an extensive capital investment. The advantages thereof are believed obvious. Moreover, when the auxiliary lift apparatus of the invention is designed for use in tandem one may achieve a precise and level control of bulky apparatus that may be handled by the resultant coupled structure as previously described.

It should of course be obvious that the invention contemplates modification as to the means for powering the auxiliary lift arms 47 without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. A principal effect is achieved by the extremely simple auxiliary apparatus being uniquely powered and controlled by coupling thereof to a single conventional unit.

Looking to FIG. 3 of the drawings, it may be there seen how greater flexibility may be added to the apparatus shown in tandem in FIG. 1 of the drawings. It is illustrated in this instance that the arms 19 have fixed in bridging relation thereto a plate 60. Vertically projected from the center of the plate 60 is a fixed pivot stud 61 the upper extremity of which is reduced in diameter and screw threaded. Rather than the channel members 52 telescoping on the lift arms 19, in this instance, they are bridged in their ends adjacent the truck 11 by an interconnected transversely disposed plate 62 the respective extremities of which nest in their channel portions. In connection of the members 52 to the lift truck 11, the plate 62 is superposed on the plate 60 and provided with a central aperture to receive therein the pivot stud 61. A nut 63 and washer 64 appropriately applied to the threaded upper end of the pivot stud 61 prevent the disengagement of the assembly of the arms 52 and the plate 62 from its interconnected relation to the lift arms 19, as described. The related and telescoped channel members 51, which interconnect with the auxiliary lift apparatus in the conjoint use thereof with the truck 11 as seen in FIG. 1 of the drawings, are in this instance mounted in superposed relation to the lift arms 47 and suitably fixed thereto to achieve a horizontal relation thereof as dictated by the connection of the members 52 to the arms 19 through the medium of the plate 60 and the pivot stud 61.

It may be seen that by the described interconnection of the channel members 52 to the lift truck 11 there is enabled a pivotal adjustment of the lift truck in relation to the plate 62 and the interconnected channel structure. This enables a more versatile positioning of the lift apparatus for use as and when the need requires. The benefits thereof are believed obvious.

FIG. 4 of the drawings shows a further embodiment of the invention, providing a two-stage lift apparatus. Here the conventionally powered lift truck 11' includes a housing 12 for its drive and lift mechanism (not shown), a base 13 and vertical channel members 16 of generally the same character and mounted in the same manner as described in reference to the comparable components of the truck 11. In this case, however, theopen upper ends of channel members 16 are not bridged. The channel members 16 relatively nest portions of mating mast members and together therewith enclose conventional lift mechanism which supports slide guides for a fork plate 18 having forwardly projected lift arm 19' disposing in a horizontal plane generally parallel to that of the base 13. The structure is conventionally contrived to permit vertical movement of the fork plate relative the mast members 72 so the lift mechanism will first elevate the fork plate and the connected lift arms substantially to the tops of the masts, whereupon the fork plate engages abutment portions on the masts and thereafter, during continued lifting thereof, carries the masts to a succeedingly higher vertically projected relation to the channel members 16'. The operation is in any instance conventional and powered by the lift mechanism as related to the appropriate controls and drive mechanism in the housing 12'. Such lift structure is not detailed since it is well known, within the capabilities of a mechanic versed in the art and not essential to an understanding of the present invention. For this reason, its showing in the drawings is diagrammatic.

Thus, the lift truck 11' has upstanding channel members in which secondary mast elements are mounted for relative vertical sliding motion under the influence of the movement of the fork plate 18' and the connected lift arms 19, as and when the need requires.

The inventive auxiliary lift apparatus 10' as used in tandem with the truck 11 is also contrived for a comparable two-stage lifting operation. The apparatus 10 includes a base bar 29 having forwardly projected transversely spaced legs as in the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1. These legs similarly mount thereunder wheels 34'. Channel formed post means 74 are fixed in vertically projected relation to the respective lateral extremities of the base bar 29. The post means 74 are each open in the direction of the lift truck 11 and each slidably accommodates, for vertical movement therein, a vertically oriented secondary mast element 75. In the inoperative position of the auxiliary apparatus 10" the masts 75 nest downwardly, within the channel formed posts 74. It is to be noted that each of the masts 75 have a projected pad 70 fixed at its lower end to dispose outwardly of the open side of the related post 74.

A fork plate assembly 77 slidably mounts between the masts 75, confined and guided thereby for vertical movement in respect thereto. At its lateral extremities the plate assembly 77 includes forwardly projected parallel lift arms 78. Noting FIG. 4 of the drawings, cables 79 have their corresponding ends connected to the lateral extremities of the fork plate 77, intermediate the masts 75. Each cable 79 extends up and over a pulley 80 mounted on the upper end of the respectively adjacent mast 75 to have its other end anchor to bracket means 81 provided on the top of the related post member 74. It may thus be seen that as the masts 75 are moved vertically in reference to the posts 74, the pulleys 80 provide tracks over which the cables 79 may be paid out to accommodate the lifting of the masts. correspondingly, the fork plate 77 and the connected lift arms 78 are vertically elevated in proportion to the movement of the masts 75.

In this instance as in the case of the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings, the center of the lower edge of the fork plate 18' mounts a bracket 21' including a pair of closely spaced dependent anchor elements to which connect corresponding ends of auxiliary control cables 82. The cables 82 extend downwardly to the base 13 in a closely spaced parallel relation to pass, respectively, under small pulleys 26' and 27' and extend forwardly in divergent relation. The cables then pass under a pair of relatively widely spaced pulleys 83 which mount on brackets fixed to the base bar 29 of the auxiliary apparatus 10. From the pulleys 83 cables 82 extend upwardly between the posts 74 in spaced parallel relation to pass over pulleys 84 mounted to bracket means 85 on the upper ends of the posts 74. Moving over the pulleys 84 the cables extend downwardly and forwardly to pass over and about pulley means 86 mounting to shaft means 86' interconnected with pad portions 70 on the masts 75. Passing around the pulleys 86, the cables 82 extend reversely and upwardly to wrap about and anchor to a shaft 87. The latter is bearingly mounted transversely of plates 88 projected forwardly of the posts 74 at their remote sides. In this case also, as in the case of the first described embodiment, shaft 87 fixedly mounts a ratchet wheel 89 a tooth of which is normally engaged by a pawl 90 to maintain a fixed position of the shaft. The shaft 87 also has in connection with one end thereof a crank arm 91 which functions in the manner of the crank 48. Thus, in detail, the shaft 87 and its related structure is essentially the same as shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings.

In use of this embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG. 4, with the truck 11' and the auxiliary apparatus 10 in tandem, as shown, and the secondary masts and the respective fork plates and related lift arms similarly lowered in the channel members of the respective supporting structures, it will be seen that as the fork plate 18' is first raised in reference to the channel members 16 and the related masts, the cables 82 are pulled upwardly producing a corresponding lift of the masts 75 through the medium of pulleys 86. Correspondingly, the upward movement of pulleys 80 causes the upward lift of the fork plate 77 and arms 78 as the pulleys move upwardly of cables 79. Thus, there is a proportional rated movement of the arms 78 mathematically related to the amount of movement of the masts 75, providing for a synchronized movement of the arms 78 and 19. With a reverse movement of arms 19' the cables of the auxiliary apparatus 10' provide a corresponding lowering of the lift arms 78. Particular attention is thus directed to the fact that in the auxiliary lift apparatus even though the masts in the lift truck 11 may not be elevated in the first instance, the masts 75 of the auxiliary apparatus are being continuously elevated and the lift arms 78 are correspondingly elevated at a certain rate in proportion thereto so as to maintain the required level of the opposed lift arms. Of course this is all predicated on the arms 78 and 19 being bridged by a platform such as described in reference to the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings.

In the event the devices 10' and 11' are interconnected but not acting directly in tandem, here again the base bar 29' may be provided with oppositely projected stabilizing legs 32 and 33 such as schematically shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings. In this way the auxiliary apparatus 10' may be coupled for independent operation to be influenced by the movement of lift arms 19 but in a rated manner so as to serve to achieve a desired proportional elevation with independent loads.

Thus, the present invention contemplates a very simple and inexpensive frame which may be endowed with lift elements and achieve a substantial lifting capacity by interconnection with the component lift structure of a conventional lift unit. Instead of having to buy a pair of conventionally powered units one need only have available one thereof and a simple frame such as here described for coupling thereof to achieve the desired end result. That is a condition enabling substantial economies in the handling of various materials for stacking and loading and unloading purposes, particularly in dock and warehouse areas.

The preferred embodiments of the invention have been here illustrated in a diagrammatic form since on the basis thereof the finished products may be achieved by any mechanic versed in the art, It should be particularly noted that when used in tandem operations, the auxiliary frame structure as shown in FIGS. 1 and 4 of the drawings is stabilized by having its leg elements disposing in the same sense as the finger portions on the conventional truck units, thereby compensating for the stresses and strains produced in the movements of the control cables which interconnect the invention apparatus to the conventional unit.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. Auxiliary lift apparatus for use with a primary lift unit which includes means providing a primary lift platform having in connection therewith means for inducing its powered movement, said apparatus comprising an independent vertically disposing frame, a secondary lift platform mounted for movement on and relative to said frame and means for inducing a vertical movement of said secondary lift platform rendered operative by a connection thereof to said means for inducing a powered movement of said primary lift platform and further means for selectively producing an independent vertical movement of said secondary lift platform.

2. Apparatus as in claim 1 characterized by the first mentioned means for inducing vertical movement of said secondary lift platform including flexible coupling means operatively interconnecting with the means for inducing the powered movement of said primary lift platform and at least one of said lift apparatus or said lift unit having means lending it mobility.

3. Auxiliary lift apparatus for use with a primary lift unit which embodies means providing a primary lift platform having in connection therewith means for inducing its powered movement; said apparatus comprising an independent vertically disposing frame, a secondary lift platform mounted for movement on and relative to said frame, means for inducing a vertical movement of said secondary lift platform rendered operative by a connection thereof to said means for inducing a powered movement of said primary lift platform, said vertically disposing frame including vertically projected transversely spaced posts which movably guide therebetween said secondary lift platform, said means for inducing a vertical movementof said secondary lift platform including cable means operatively connected at one end to said secondary lift platform and at the opposite end to said primary lift platform to produce thereby a responsive adjustment of said secondary lift platform in correspondence with a movement of said primary lift platform, and means operatively connected with said cable means for effecting a vertical adjustment of said secondary lift platform which is independent of the movements of said primary lift platform.

4. Auxiliary lift apparatus for use with a primary lift unit which embodies means providing a primary lift platform having in connection therewith means for inducing its powered movement; said apparatus comprising an independent vertically disposing frame, a secondary life platform mounted for movement on and relative to said frame, means for inducing a vertical movement of said secondary lift platform rendered operative by a connection thereof to said means for inducing a powered movement of said primary lift platform, said vertically disposing frame including vertically projected transversely spaced posts which movably guide therebetween said secondary lift platform, vertically disposing frame components serving as guides for said posts which are selectively adapted to nest therein or project vertically therefrom, said means for inducing a vertical movement of said secondary lift platform including cable-like means interconnected with said vertically disposing frame and posts and adapted for connection to said primary lift platform, said cable means being rendered operative thereby to induce a vertical adjustment of said posts in correspondence with a vertical adjustment of said primary lift platform.

5. Auxiliary lift apparatus as in claim 4 characterized by additional cable-like means connecting to said frame at one end and supporting said secondary lift platform at the opposite end, said posts being operatively related to produce a selective lifting or lowering of said secondary lift platform through the medium of said additional cable-like means.

6. Auxiliary lift apparatus for use with a primary lift unit which embodies means providing a primary lift platform having in connection therewith means for inducing its powered movement; said apparatus comprising an independent vertically disposing frame, a secondary lift platform mounted for movement on and relative to said frame and means for inducing a vertical movement of said secondary lift platform rendered operative by a connection thereof to said means for inducing a powered movement of said primary lift platform, said primary lift platform having motion in stages, said auxiliary lift apparatus including mast means vertically extensible relative to said frame, said secondary lift platform being mounted to said mast means for relative vertical motion, a coupling from said frame to said secondary lift platform being acted on by said mast means to raise and lower said secondary lift platform in conjunction with and differentially of movement of said mast means, and coupling means connecting to said mast means and adapted to raise and lower said mast means, on connection thereof with said primary lift platform in correspondence with motions of said primary lift platform.

7. Apparatus according to claim 6, characterized by means on said vertically disposing frame for raising and lowering said mast means independently of the movement of said primary lift platform.

8. Auxiliary lift apparatus according to claim 1, wherein said frame has a base mounting means operativeto balance the forces imposed thereon by an operative coupling of said secondary lift platform to said primary lift unit. p

9. Auxiliary lift apparatus for use with a power operated fork lift or like unit, said apparatus including an independent unpowered auxiliary lift device adapted for positioning in a spaced relation to the said lift unit, said device comprising a mobile base and upstanding support means, a separate lift mounted for vertical movement on said support means, meansattaching to said separate lift at one end and operatively connectable to the said power operated lift to provide that said separate lift is raised and lowered in response to and in correspondence with the raising and lowering of the said power operated lift and further lift means providing for relative movement of said power operated lift and said separate lift.

10. Auxiliary lift apparatus according to claim 9 characterized in that said further lift means is operatively related to provide a vertical adjustment of said separate lift which is independent of any movement thereof under the influence of said power operated lift.

11. Apparatus as set forth in claim 9 characterized by said further lift means being a platform connectable between said power operated lift and said separate lift for their mutual cooperation in raising and lowering loads, which platform accommodates relative movement between said power operated life unit and said independent lift device.

12. Auxiliary lift apparatus according to claim 11 characterized by said relative movement is provided by a pivotal connection of said platform to one of said power operated lift or said separate lift.

13. Auxiliary lift apparatus as in claim 9 characterized by said means attaching to said separate lift at one end and operatively connectable to said power operated lift comprises cable means, there being pulleys guiding said cable means to provide that said separate lift is raised and lowered in response to and in correspondence with raising and lowering of said power operated lift and adjusting means connecting to said cable means for incrementally adjusting the position of said separate lift independently of the said power operated lift having the form of rotatable reel means having a fixed base to which said one end of said cable means is connected, releasable latch means being provided normally to hold said reel means against said rotation whereby the said separate lift normally follows the movements of the said power operated lift, means being provided to selectively rotate said reel means whereby to provide for the said independent incremental adjustment of the said separate lift.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,121,565 6/1938 Latimer 254-144 2,816,675 12/1957 Baker 214-390 3,284,052 11/1966 GOdbersen 254148 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,214,849 4/ 1960 France.

EVON C. BLUNK, Primary Examiner.

H. C. HORNSBY, Assistant Examiner.

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US3709331 *Jul 24, 1970Jan 9, 1973C & M Mfg Co IncCarriage safety system
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US4512117 *Aug 6, 1982Apr 23, 1985Interlock Structures International, Inc.Modular proscenium theatre
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US5087167 *Oct 9, 1990Feb 11, 1992Allegheny Ludlum CorporationLifting shoe assembly for use on sheet lifters
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Classifications
U.S. Classification187/235, 187/243, 414/458, 254/387, 187/237, 254/4.00R
International ClassificationB66F9/06
Cooperative ClassificationB66F9/06
European ClassificationB66F9/06