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Publication numberUS3414124 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 3, 1968
Filing dateMay 5, 1967
Priority dateMay 5, 1967
Also published asDE1761335A1
Publication numberUS 3414124 A, US 3414124A, US-A-3414124, US3414124 A, US3414124A
InventorsLidgard Edward J
Original AssigneeFlotepak Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container for sheetlike material
US 3414124 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 3, 1968 3,414,124

E. .1, I vlDGARD CONTAINER FOR SHEE'TLIKE MATERIAL Filed May 1967 3 Sheets-Sheet 1l E f4 f4 f v /NVENTOR M WMLM A TTORNEVS Dec. 3, 196s E. J. UDGARD 3,414,124

CONTAINER FOR SHEETLIKE MATERIAL Filed May 1967 3 Smets-sheet 2 A 7' TORNEVS AE. J. I IDGARDA 3,414,124

CONTAINER FOR SHEETLIKE MATERIAL 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 F I G ll Dec. 3, 1968 Filed May 5, 1967 ATTORNEYS United States Patent O 3,414,124 CONTAINER FOR SHEETLIKE MATERIAL Edward J. Ldgard, Lathrup Village, Mich., assignor to Flotepak Corporation, Southfield, Mich., a corporation of Michigan Filed May 5, 1967, Ser. No. 636,293 9 Claims. (Cl. 206-62) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An improvement in a packaging and shipping container for multiplicity of frangible plates which includes a fourwall enclosure with transverse supporting logs and unique means on the edge of the plates to frictionally engage the same and to mechanically lock with a log on one of the walls in a manner to secure the plates against endwise displacement, interlock the plates, and also space the plates.

This invention relates to a container for sheetlike material such as glass and lmore particularly to a container which facilitates the handling and storing of a plurality of relatively thin sheets of material such as glass. An eX- ample of use of the invention is in the shipping and storing of curving sheets of glass such as windshields and rear window lights for automobiles.

Reference is made to U.S. Patent No. 2,919,022, issued to Edward J. Lidgard on Dec. 29, 1959, wherein the general type of container under consideration is described in detail.

Recent changes in automotive design have resulted in windshields and back window lights which have less curvature than those of previous models. This has resulted in slightly different requirements for packing and has per- -mitted the closer spacing of windshields, for example.

The present invention contemplates improved packing elements in combination which provide adequate support and protection for the sheets in transit and provide a structure which not only can be loaded and unloaded more easily but which is materially reduced in size. The package can be used for storage and stock release and, because of its structure, it permits edge access to the glass while horizontal and thus it reduces the warehouse requirements as well as lthe weight of shipping.

In addition, the assembly results in cost reduction because of the easier loading and the novel components of the structure which not only are designed for quick application and serve to provide endwise locking but also permit each panel to support the next panel in the overall package. In addition, the device may be adapted to varied spacing of parts where this is required and is adaptable to assembling any required number of panels that are to be shipped in a particular unit.

Other objects and features of `the invention will be apparent in the following description and claims wherein the principles of the invention are set out together with the use thereof in connection with the best mode of the invention persently contemplated.

Drawings accompanying the disclosure and the various views thereof may be briey described as:

FIGURE l, a view of the container looking in one side with the container in a position for loading.

FIGURE 2, another view of the container positioned horizontally in upright shipping position.

FIGURE 3, an enlarged portion of one corner of the top wall of the container ilustrating the manner in which a glass panel is oriented longitudinally relative to the container.

FIGURE 4, a View of a blank of a holding component which is utilized for endwise positioning.

ICC

FIGURE 5, a View of the holding component partially folded.

FIGURE 6, a sectional view adjacent a wall of a container showing the longitudinal positioning component in assembly.

FIGURE 7, a sectional View on line 7--7 of FIG- URE 6.

FIGURE 8, a segmental view on line 8-8 of FIGURE 6 showing a plurality of panels in position.

FIGURE 9, a view showing spacer inserts between stacked plates.

FIGURE 10, a view of a spacer which may be utilized by ythe loaded plates where this is desirable to avoid stress loading.

FIGURE l1, a view of a modified container using the principles of the invention.

FIGURE 12, a modified container assembly showing top clearance.

FIGURE 13, an enlarged sectional view showing the manner of interlock of holding components.

FIGURE 14, a perspective view of interlocked holding components.

Referring to the drawings, the container which' is utilized for shipping the multiplicity of glass plates is shown in FIGURES l and 2. FIGURE 2 actually shows the box in shipping position wherein the wall panel 20, formed of crating or corrugated cardboard, has a dense cellotex or Wood log 22 extending transversely of the box and securely located in spaced relation to the end by two slats 24 and 26 which are stapled or glued to the wall of the box. A similar structure is located at each end. This log 22 is the load carrying log on the bottom of the structure when in shipping position and supports the edges of the glass plates.

The opposite ltop panel of the container is shown at 30 with another log 32 suitably positioned by slats 34 and 36 adjacent each end. The container is suitably closed by end panels 38 and 40. In FIGURE 1, the side walls of the box 42 and 44 are shown, again each with slats 46 and 48, which locate corrugated log spacers 50 and 52 at the bottom and the top respectively. It will be seen that these spacers may be formed from a single rectangular log which is cut at an angle so that surface 54 at the bottom complements the curve of the panels to be shipped and surface 56 at the top similarly complements the panels. The height of the log for a particular container may be selected when the number of sheets to be packed is known. The package can thus be loaded with any desired number depending on the requirements of the addressee.

The container assembly is preferably loaded as it is positioned in FIGURE 1 with the panel 42 resting horizontally on a suitable support 58. In FIGURE 4, the stabilizers 60 are shown which serve to establish the position of the glass panels longitudinally of the assembly. As shown in the blank form, the rectangular hard cardboard panel 60 has a pre-impressed double fold 62 longitudinally thereof substantially centrally of the panel with a U- shaped cut 64 which actually provides an opening in the device. A-llap 66 is formed with a pre-impressed double fold mark 68 at the base and angled side cuts 70 with a truncating cut 72.

The cut 64 has a slight indentation at each side to form shoulders 65 spaced from the base of the cut, and the llap 66 is cut to form extending shoulders or barbs 67 reasonably near the base or fold point `68 of the flap.

A strip of adhesive material 74 is positioned along the bottom edge of the stabilizer as shown in FIGURE 4. When the `device is folded ready for application, it appears as in FIGURE 5 but closed a little more with the flap 66 extending through opening 76 where the barbs 67 latch against the narrowed opening below the shoulders 65. The

barbs 67 passreadily through the wider portion of the opening` 76 and then when the flap 66 is folded outside the wall portion 77, the barbs 67 latch over the edges of the narrowed portion of opening 76 to hold the stabilizer in partially closed position ready for assembly. The abovedescribed construction of the stabilizers 60 makes it possible to prepare the stabilizers in advance for assembly in a semi-fold position and they will lock together in a position closed a little more than the position shown in FIGURE 5 ready for quick application to the edge of a glass as it is projected into the container.

The opening 76, because of the cuts 64 and 70, provides a rectangular opening in the folded edge of the stabilizer 60 which interts with the load-carrying log 22 adjacent the panel of the structure. When the stabilizer is applied to the glass, the loop formed by the iiap A66 will engage the edge of the glass, and the adhesive 74 will cling to the glass to provide substantial resistance against any tendency to move the stabilizer lengthwise of the glass. As soon as the weight of the glass is placed on the side 77 and the flap 66, the stabilizer is held in fully folded position.

As the sheets are loaded, as shown in FIGURE 1, the iirst panel 80 has two stabilizers 60 which are applied as shown in FIGURE 6 by a fold over the edge of the panel and the U-shaped recess created by flap 66 indicated generally at 82 serves as a locating socket for the upper edge S4 of the panel 80. This leaves the notched portion of the stabilizer 60 extending outwardly from the edge of the panel 80 so that it may intert with the log 22.

As shown in FIGURE 1, the additional panels may be then loaded into the container, the next panel being 82a and the last panel being 8211. When the container is cornpletely loaded, the log 52 is applied to take up the remainder of the space between the last panel 821i and the wall 44. When this is accomplished, the panel 30 of the box can then be applied to close the container. As each plate or sheet is inserted with the stabilizers 60 on the leading edge interiitting against the logs 22, a U-shaped pad of protective material 86 is applied at two places to the outer edge of alternate panels as they are inserted to space the panels at these outer edges in a manner similar to the spacing at the inner edges at the stabilizer 60 and in a position to register with the logs 32 in a nal assembly. Thus, the stabilizers stack one on top of each other as shown in FIGURE 8 and the U-shaped members 86 also stack holding each other securely against dislodgment.

The entire assembly, then, of container walls, spacer stabilizers, and stacked sheets forms a unified stable construction in which each part contributes to the strength and rigidity of the whole.

In FIGURE 10, a U-shaped spacer element 90 is shown and this may have a Varied thickness either as a dimension such as shown as A or a dimension shown as B. These spacers can be supplied in varied thicknesses to permit insertion between the stabilizers 60 and the protective pads to space certain panels that might otherwise contact each other because of the inherent curvature. These spacers can have a gummed surface, if desired, to prevent dislodgment. FIGURE 8 shows the manner in which the panels and the stabilizers 60 are stacked directly on each other. FIGURE 9 shows the use of spacers 90 between the stabilizers 60.

It will thus be seen that when the entire container is completed, there are rigid logs adjacent each wall which securely positioned the load within the container. The stabilizer elements 60, which are very rapidly applied, serve not only to space the panels from each other but also have the provision of a notched portion projecting from the assembly which securely engages the load-carrying logs 22 and thus the entire assembly is locked against shifting within the container. Since this assembly permits insertion of the plates horizontally, as shown in FIGURE l, it has been found that it is much easier for an operator to install the plates as distinguished from lowering them edgewise into a box. As the panels stack up, each one on top holds the stabilizer unit of the one on the bottom in position and securely presses the adhesive portion 74 in to engagement with the glass surface. The adhesive portion can be any material which has a non-etching relationship to the glass. Upon receipt of the assembly at the destination, the side 30 can be removed and the container stacked horizontally for ready access of any particular panel as needed.

lIn FIGURE 11, a modified outer structure is shown and slightly dilerent panel curvature. Base logs 122 are held in place by slats 124, 126 on base panel 120 While at the top of the container, in shipping position, the panel 130 carries log 132 positioned by slats 134, 136. Ends 138 and are provided and the side logs and side walls are constructed as shown in FIGURE 1. The side logs 50 and 52 of FIGURE l, and the corresponding logs of FIGURE 11 can be cut with a compound curvature when needed to tit the longitudinal and transverse curve of the panels.

FIGURE 12 shows a cross section of the container of FIGURE l1 but with a modified load. Side walls are formed, as are the top and bottom walls, of flat wide slats and the side logs 150, 152 are interpositioned between bottom and top logs 122, 132. The previously described interlock stabilizer 60 is shown engaging log 122 and top pads 84 are hairpinned over the top edge of the panels 180. A metal strap 182 can be used if desired to lock in the top log if the container happens to be higher than the particular panels being shipped as shown in FIGURE 12. The strap passes over a wood strip 184 which bears on the log 132. End caps 188 are placed on every other panel to afrord additional shock protection in handling the panels in loading and unloading.

It will thus be seen that the positioning logs need not be notched to prevent side or transverse movement of the panels. The stabilizer pads 60 lock the panels against endwise movement and the panels themselves nestle together to hold the pads closed. The side logs 50, 52 of FIGURE 1 and 150, 152 of FIGURE 12 complete the transverse stabilization. When the assembly is opened and a panel removed, the pads 60 are readily opened and stripped from the glass.

The holding component or stabilizer unit 60 is used in a slightly different manner in FIGURES ll `to 14. As shown in FIGURE 12, for example, the tab 66 is eX- tended outwardly normal to the general disposition of the stabilizer unit so that it ts against the top edge of the log 122. Thus, the tabs 66 overlap as shown in FIG- URE 13 and overlie each other to form a continuous pad of substantially three thicknesses and possibly more depending on the length of the tab 66 between the edge of the plates and the surface of the log. Each tab 66 interits into the notch of the next adjacent stabilizer unit 60 and so on so that all of the stabilizer units are locked together against displacement by reason of this positioning.

Also, as shown in FIGURE 14, the shoulder 67 of each tab will position in such a way that it will engage the adjacent wall of the next component 60. The space, for example, shown in FIGURE 14 inside the shoulder 67'is sufficient to receive the adjacent wall of the next member 60. In FIGURE 13, for example, the tab 66a will lock with the wall 60a of the second component 60 and the shoulder 67 of the tab 66h will engage with the wall 6012 of the third component 60 and so on. Thus, all of the components are interengaged against separation by the shoulder 67 and against relative longitudinal displacement by the interlock of the tabs as they pass through the respective notches of the adjacent stabilizer unit 60 across the package. Thus, the entire set of glass plates which are joined together, one at a time as the package is assembled, becomes a unified component in the completed package.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. An endwise panel stabilizer for use in a plural plate glass pack comprising a stabilizer and spacer sheet having an opening centrally thereof substantially bisected by a fold in said element, and a lock tab hinged by a fold at one edge of said opening having shoulder barbs adjacent the hinge part to engage edges of said opening to lock said sheet in partially folded condition for assembly.

2. A device as defined in claim 1 in which said opening in said stabilizer sheet is narrowed at a portion re-mote from the hinge area of said tab to provide edges to engage said shoulder barbs of said tab.

3. A protective shipping and storage container for frangible plates such as glass which comprises, in combination, a four-wall enclosure formed of two pairs of opposed walls, each of said walls having a pair of transversely extending support logs secured against displacement on said respective walls, said logs on one pair of opposed walls being positioned to contact the opposed edges of said plates, said logs on the other pair of opposed walls being positioned to contact the outside opposed surfaces of a plurality of stacked plates, and means on the edge of said plates to frictionally engage each plate securely, said means being positioned adjacent each other and shaped to mechanically lock with each other and with a log on one of said walls to lock said plates against endwise displacement within said container.

4. A device as defined in claim 3 in which said means comprises a stabilizer and spacer sheet having an opening centrally thereof bisected by a fold in said element, and a lock tab hinged by a fold at one edge of said opening, having means to engage edges of said opening to lock said sheet in partially folded condition prior to assembly and to lock said stabilizers to each other in final assembly, said tabs being disposed to underlie tabs of adjacent units progressively to form a continuous pad between said plates and said log.

5. A protective shipping and storage container for frangible plates such as glass which comprises, in combination, a four-wall enclosure formed of two pairs of opposed walls, each of said walls having a pair of transversely extending support logs secured against displacement on said respective walls, said logs on one pair of opposed walls being positioned to contact the opposed edges of said plates, said logs on the other pair of opposed walls being positioned to contact the outside opposed surfaces of a plurality of stacked plates, and means on the edge of said plates to frictionally engage each plate securely and shaped to mechanically lock with a log on one of said walls to lock said plates against endwise displacement within said container, said means comprising a stabilizer and spacer sheet having an opening centrally thereof substantially bisected by a fold in said element, and a lock tab hinged by a fold at one edge of said opening, having shoulder barbs adjacent the hinge part to engage edges of said opening to lock said sheet in partially folded condition for assembly.

6. A device as defined in claim 5 in which said opening in said stabilizer sheet is narrowed at a portion remote from the hinge area of said tab to provide edges to engage said shoulder barbs of said tab.

7. A protective shipping and storage container for frangible plates such as glass which comprises, in combination, a four-wall enclosure formed of two pairs of opposed walls, a pair of transversely extending support logs secured against displacement on at least one of said walls, said logs being positioned to contact and support edges of said plates, means at the others of said walls to locate said plates against lateral displacement, and means on the edge of each said plates adjacent said logs to frictionally engage each plate securely, said means being positioned adjacent each other and shaped to mechanically lock with each other and with a log to lock plates against endwise displacement.

8. A device as defined `in claim 7 in which said last means comprises a stabilizer and spacer sheet having an opening therein, said sheet being folded across said opening to form a notch at one edge, and a lock tab hinged by a fold at one edge of said opening, said tab having a length wherein it will project toward and through adjacent openings of adjacent folded stabilizer sheets and overlie similarly projecting tabs on adjacent sheets on a supporting side of a support log, the tabs being dimensioned to engage the edges of said opening to interlock the adjacent sheets, the notches of which are in engagement with a log.

9. A device as defined in claim 8 on which the tabs have barbs on the edges thereof to engage and interlock with one Wall of an adjacent folded sheet.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,743,010 4/1956 KOeSter 206-62 2,919,022 l2/ 1959 Lidgard 206-62 2,957,575 10/1960 Grim et al. 206-62 MARTHA L. RICE, Primary Examiner'.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2743010 *Dec 12, 1951Apr 24, 1956Libbey Owens Ford Glass CoPackage of curved glass sheets
US2919022 *Oct 3, 1957Dec 29, 1959Flotepak CorpContainer for a plurality of sheets of glass or the like
US2957575 *Apr 13, 1959Oct 25, 1960Love Box Company IncShipping container
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3921890 *Jan 22, 1973Nov 25, 1975Reihm Richard SPacking device for frangible material
US4225043 *May 7, 1979Sep 30, 1980Ppg Industries, Inc.Securing pads for sheet shipping containers
US4353466 *Sep 17, 1980Oct 12, 1982Ppg Industries, Inc.Slotted support logs for sheet shipping containers
US4805774 *Aug 27, 1987Feb 21, 1989Salisbury John WSupport log for shipping sheet material
US5101976 *Dec 4, 1989Apr 7, 1992Salisbury John WShipping log for components
US7159715 *May 14, 2004Jan 9, 2007International Paper CompanyContainer with integrated pallet for shipping television screens
US7228967Oct 16, 2003Jun 12, 2007Homasote CompanyMeans for safely supporting fragile articles
US7458465Sep 1, 2005Dec 2, 2008Batavia Container, Inc.Protective package for an automobile part
US7665280 *Sep 2, 2008Feb 23, 2010American Corrugated Products, Inc.Automobile part shipping system and method
US8122690 *Mar 31, 2009Feb 28, 2012Dimauro PaulPackaging system and method
US20110049000 *Aug 27, 2010Mar 3, 2011Victor Company Of Japan, Ltd.Package structure for thin display apparatus and method of packing thin display apparatus
USRE44083Dec 1, 2010Mar 19, 2013Batavia Container, Inc.Protective package for an automobile part
EP0941858A1Mar 12, 1999Sep 15, 1999Canon Kabushiki KaishaPrinting apparatus and method of controlling it
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/448, 206/386
International ClassificationB65D5/50, B65D85/48
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/48, B65D5/5028
European ClassificationB65D85/48, B65D5/50D