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Publication numberUS3415210 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 10, 1968
Filing dateJan 3, 1966
Priority dateJan 3, 1966
Publication numberUS 3415210 A, US 3415210A, US-A-3415210, US3415210 A, US3415210A
InventorsAaron Glassman
Original AssigneePennsylvania Sewing Res Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Attachment for sewing machines
US 3415210 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

De@ l0, 1968 A. GLAssMAN ATTACHMENT FOR SEWING MACHINES W, 7 A m Z.; 7,07/ mM E .M 3 5 vl nnl# a/ M o a/Q E 0 w Il ,f A j r ,l Vt m Ww. zn. '4 7 Z z y ,w

lll/1111111 United States Patent O 3,415,210 ATTACHMENT FOR SEWING MACHINES Aaron Glassman, Scranton, Pa., assigner to Pennsylvania Sewing Research Corp., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed Jan. 3, 1966, Ser. No. 518,320 4 Claims. (Cl. 112-114) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLSURE A hook and eye attachment, usually for mounting on a button clamp of a sewing machine. Once set up, the attachment may be used to sew a metal hook, or a metal eye, or to form by sewing a thread eye without further adjustment. In some embodiments, the attachment may be used for holding a magnetic hook or a magnetic eye in a predetermined position for sewing.

Hook and eye attachements for sewing machines have been describe-d previously. Such previous attachments may comprise a horizontally-extending positioning member having seats for the eyelets of a metal hook or eye and means for holding the hook or eye in the seat. Such previous attachments are Widely used for holding a hook or eye in position while Ibeing sewn by a needle which enters each eyelet alternately.

In the course of producing garments, it is common to receive orders for goods lwhich require a metal hook in combination with a thread eye along with goods which require a metal hook in combination with a metal eye. In such situations, it is necessary to provide special setups for thread eyes and metal eyes with consequent loss of time, extra expense, and need for additional personnel.

An object of this invention is to provide a novel attachment for sewing thread eyes.

Another object is to provide a novel attachment which can position a metal hook or metal eye or can form a thread eye.

In general, the novel attachment comprises a support adapted for mounting on a sewing machine (usually attached to the button clamp), a finger pivotally-mounted on the support and normally being in a substantially vertical position, a :means for applying a force to rotate the finger to a substantially horizontal position, and a means such as a spring for returning the nger from the horizontal position to the vertical position.

For use, the attachment is mounted in position on the machine. When a thread eye is desired, the attachment is positioned on the fabric and the operator pulls the finger down to the horizontal position.. The needle forms the thread eye over the linger. When the machine stops, the operator slips the eye off the finger, and the attachment returns the finger to its normal position.

In many embodiments, the above-described structure is incorporated in an attachment for positioning metal hooks and eyes. Thus, with a single attachment and a single setup, the operator may sew a tmetal hook, a metal eye, or a thread eye in any order of succession. In a preferred embodiment, the above-described structure is incorporated in a magnetic hook and eye attachment of the type described in U.S. Patent No. 3,143,092 to Aaron Glassman et al.

A detailed description of the invention and an illustrative embodiment thereof appears below with reference to the drawings in which:

3,415,210 Patented Dec. 10, 1968 ice FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the invention,

FIGURE 2 is a sectional elevational view of the embodiment of FIGURE 1 in position prior to forming a thread eye,

FIGURE 3 is a plan view of the embodiment of FIG- URE 1 in position after forming a thread eye,

FIGURE 4 is a sectional elevational view of the elmbodiment of FIGURE 1 in position prior to sewing on a metal hook,

FIGURE 5 is a plan view of the embodiment of FIG- URE 1 in position after sewing on al-metal hook, and

FIGURE 6 is a plan View of the embodiment of FIG- URE 1 in position after sewing on a metal eye.

Similar reference numerals are used for similar elements throughout the drawings.

FIGURE 1 to 6 illustrate a preferred embodiment of the invention. The embodiment is a unitary structure having an L shape with an overall height (vertical `dimension) of about 1.00 inch, an overall length (horizontal dimension) of atbout 1.00 inch, and a width of about 0.50 inch. All of the portions of the attachment are of a nonmagnetic material such as brass, copper, plastic, or ceramic, except as otherwise indicated.

A vertically-extending shank portion 21 of the preferred embodiment is about 0.125 inch long (horizontal 'dimension) and has a vertical slot 23 therein extending downward from the upper end thereof for attaching the shank portion 21 to a portion 29 on a sewing machine as shown in FIGURES 2 and 4. For attachment, the shank portion 21 is slipped under a screw head 25 of a screw 27 in the slot 23. The attachment is positioned as desired, and the screw 27 tightened.

The horizontally-extending positioning portion 31, also referred to as the foot of the embodiment, is about 0.31 inch high and about 1.00 inch long (horizontal dimension). The positioning portion or foot 31 is attached to the lower end of the shank portion 21 and is preferably integral with the shank portion 21. The extended end 33 of the positioning portion 31 has an open definitely shaped cavity 35 therein adapted to receive either a metal hook or a metal eye of the type which has a pair of adjacent eyelets at one end thereof through which the thread passes for stitching the hook or eye -to fabric. The opening to the cavity 35 is formed in part by two opposed curved or arcuate surfaces 37 arrange-d to receive the outer opposed curved surfaces of the eyelets of a hook or an eye. FIGURE 5 illustrates the outer opposed curved surfaces of the eyelets 73 of a hook 71 bearing against the curved surfaces 37 of the cavity. FIGURE 6 illustrates the outer opposed curved surfaces of the eyelets 79 of an eye 77 bearing against the curved surfaces 37 of the cavity 35. The extended end of the foot 31 curves inwardly so that the foot v31 is clear of the stitching needle 61 and of the stitches 67 formed by the sewing machine. As illustrated in FIGURE 4, the adjacent eyelets 73 extend beyond the cavity and under the stitching needle 61.

The cavity includes also a first pair of parallel spaced vertical walls 39, a horizontal floor 41, and a first horizontal roof 43 extending inwardly Iof the foot 31 adapting the foot 31 to receive the hook portion 75 of the hook 71 as illustrated in FIGURE 4. The cavity 35 includes also a second pair of parallel spaced vertical walls 45, the horizontal door 4i, and a second horizontal roof 47 extending inwardly of the foot 31 adapting the foot 31 to receive the eye portion of the eye '77.

A small cylindrical permanent magnet 51 is fixed within the foot 31 and axially aligned with the cavity 35. The magnet extends from the most inward portion of the cavity 35 to the end of the foot 31 which joins the shank 21. The magnet 51 may be so positioned by pressing it into a small cylindrical hole bored in the desired position4 for that purpose. The magnet 51 may be held in the hole *by a press-fit, -by adhesive, or by other suitable arrangement. The magnet 51 is magnetized so that a magnetic field (also referred to as magnetic flux) extends through the opening of the cavity 35. The magnet 51 may be so magnetized either before or after insertion into the foot 31. The magnet 51 may be of any of the known permanent magnet materials, `but is preferably of an aluminum-nickel-cobalt alloy, generally known as alnico. Where a longer magnet 51 is required, the magnet 51 may extend under the stationary portion 29 of the sewing machine, or may `be housed in a longer foot 31. The magnet may also be an electromagnet.

The foot 31 also has a transverse hole 53 extending across the width of the foot 31 at the most inward portion of the cavity 35. It has been found that dust, lint, and other fine material tend to accumulate at the most inward portion of the cavity at the end of the magnet 51. The hole 53 provides an access through which this undesirable material may be removed, as by blowing with air.

A finger 81 is mounted at one end thereof in a recess 82 in the upper surface of the foot 31 with a pivot pin 83. The pivot pin 83 is press-fit into the body of the finger 81 and is free to rotate in a bearing hole in the body of the -foot 31. The finger 81 and the recess 82 are constituted in three parts so that the finger 81 can be rotated from a substantially vertical position as shown in FIGURES l and 4 to a substantially horizontal position as shown in FIGURE 2. The extended end of the finger S1 has a spacer 84 'formed at the bottom thereof and has a rounded top 85 over which a thread eye may be formed, and is tapered toward its end to permit a formed thread eye to slide off easily. A finger grip 86 is attached to the finger 81 between the pivot pin 83 and the end S5. A spring 87 is mounted between the finger grip 86 and a pin 88 fixedly mounted on the foot 31. The spring 87 extends through a hole 89 in the shank portion 21 which is elongate and extends into the upper surface of the foot 31. The hole 89 is of such size and shape that when the finger 81 is rotated to the horizontal position, the spring 87 will have adequate clearance.

To operate the attachment, the shank portion Z1 is mounted on a portion of a sewing machine; usually the button clamp (not shown), so that the attachment is below the needle 61. To form a thread eye, the operator first positions the fabric 63 on the table 65 and lowers the foot 31 into contact with the fabric. Then, the operator presses the finger grip 86 to rotate the finger 81 downward against the spring 87 to a substantially horizontal position so that the spacer 84 contacts the fabric 63 as shown in FIGURE 2. While holding the finger down, the operator actuates the machine so `that the needle 61 forms a plurality of stitches, as shown in FIGURE 3, forming the thread loop 90 by alternate motion to each side of the finger over the rounded top 85 of the finger 81. When at least six stitches have been formed, the needle 61 is stopped in the raised position, the thread severed, the foot 31 is raised, and the thread loop 90 is slid off the extended end of the finger 81. The finger 81 then returns to the vertical position by the action of the spring 87.

To sew a metal hook or eye, a hook 71 (or an eye 77) is held close to the open end of the cavity 35 in the desired orientation. The magnetic flux extending from the magnet 51 through the open end of the cavity 35 draws the hook 71 (or the eye 77) into the cavity 35 and holds it therein with the outer opposed curved surfaces of the eyelets 73 (or 79) bearing against the arcuate spaced walls 37 of the cavity 35. A piece of fabric 63 is positioned on a table 65 below the needle 61. The attachment is now moved downwardly so that the bottom of the foot 31 rests on the fabric 63 as shown in FIGURE 4. The needle 61 now stitches the hook 71 (or the eye 77) to the fabric 63 by alternate motion into each eyelit 73 (or 79). FIGURES 5 and 6` illustrate the stitching 67 through the eyelits i3 (or 79). After stitching, the attachment is moved upward and the fabric 63 with the hook 71 (or the eye 77) stitched thereto is removed.

The horizontally-extending foot portion 31 and the shank portion 21 may be perpendicular to one another. It has been found advantageous, however, to make the angle therebetween slightly greater than preferably about so that the extended end 33 of the foot 31 toes slightly downward. It is further advantageous to bevel the bottom of the foot 31 so that the bottom portion 55 near the extended end 33 is perpendicular to the shank 21. The downward toe and the bevel 55 of the foot 31 brings the eyelets 73 (or 79) closer to the fabric 63 producing a tighter stitching thereto.

The preferred attachment has the advantage that the single attachment with a single setup is capable of sewing metal hooks, metal eyes, and thread eyes in any order without adjustment. A thread eye forming finger may lalso be integrated in other hook and eye attachments, or may be used on an attachment solely for forming thread eyes.

What is claimed is:

1. An attachment for sewing thread eyes comprising:

(a) a support adapted for mounting on a sewing machine,

(b) a finger pivotally-mounted on said support and normally being in a substantially vertical position,

(c) a means for applying a force to rotate said finger to a substantially horizontal position,

(d) and a means for constantly urging said finger from said horizontal position to said substantially vertical position.

2. An attachment for sewing thread eyes comprising:

(a) a support adapted for mounting on a stationary portion of a sewing machine,

(b) a nger pivotally-rnounted near one end thereof on said support,

(c) a spring mounted between said finger and said support and adapted to constantly `urge said finger into a substantially vertical position,

(d) and a finger grip attached to said finger for applying a force to rotate said finger against the force of said spring to a substantially horizontal position.

3. A hook and eye attachment comprising:

(a) a substantially horizontally-extending positioning member having an open cavity therein, at least a portion of the walls of said cavity defining a seat for a hook or an eye,

(b) magnetic means for producing a magnetic flux which extends from said seat through the opening of said cavity,

(c) a finger pivotally-mounted on and being a part of said attachment,

(d) yieldable means for constantly maintaining said finger in a substantially vertical position,

(e) and means for applying a force to rotate said finger against the force of said yieldable :means to a horizontally-extending position.

4. A hook and eye attachment comprising:

(a) a vertically-extending shank portion adapted for mounting on the button clamp of a sewing machine,

(b) a horizontally-extending hook and eye positioning portion attached to said shank portion, said positioning portion having an open cavity in an extended end thereof, at least a portion of the walls of said cavity defining a seat for the eyelets of a hook or an eye,

(c) a magnet Within said positioning portion for producing a magnetic flux which extends from said seat through the opening of said cavity,

(d) a finger pivotally-mounted near one end thereof References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,101,134 6/1914 Lyons 112--107 5 1,296,029 3/1919 Wilson 112-105 3,143,092 8/1964 Glassman et al. 112-105 3,123,032 3/1964 Gehringer 112-107 JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Examiner.

10 G. V. LARKIN, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1101134 *Oct 19, 1911Jun 23, 1914Union Button Sewing CompanyHook-holding device for sewing-machines.
US1296029 *Dec 24, 1914Mar 4, 1919Wilson Dress Hook CompanySewing-machine.
US3123032 *Apr 23, 1963Mar 3, 1964 Sewing machine attachment
US3143092 *Jun 18, 1962Aug 4, 1964Pennsylvania Sewing Res CorpAttachments for sewing machines
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3561381 *Jan 28, 1970Feb 9, 1971Weiss MartinSewing machine button holding mechanism
US4363280 *Aug 11, 1980Dec 14, 1982Pennsylvania Sewing Research Corp.Sewing machine attachments
US4524704 *Apr 20, 1983Jun 25, 1985G & G Sewing Machine Co., Inc.Accessory-holding jig providing multiple sewing positions
US4554877 *Dec 6, 1984Nov 26, 1985P.S.R., IncorporatedAlignment system for a garment accessory-holding jig
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/114
International ClassificationD05B3/18, D05B29/00, D05B29/06, D05B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD05B29/06, D05D2207/06, D05B3/18
European ClassificationD05B3/18