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Publication numberUS3415420 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 10, 1968
Filing dateFeb 20, 1967
Priority dateFeb 20, 1967
Publication numberUS 3415420 A, US 3415420A, US-A-3415420, US3415420 A, US3415420A
InventorsWhite Willard Henry
Original AssigneeWhite Willard Henry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy gun
US 3415420 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 10, 1968 w. H. WHITE 3,415,420

TOY GUN Filed Feb. 20, 1967 2 Sheets-Sheet l FIG. 2

I /'f I III I I I 13 I6 I "'23 29 I I4 57' I8 2 I9 P 2a I FIG. I

FIG. 4

38 LL] I I 1/7 I I I I I I I III/ INVENTOR WILLARD HENRY WHITE ATTORNEY W. H. WHITE Dec. 10, 1968 TOY GUN 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 20, 1967 FIG. 6

FIG. 5

WILLARD HENRY WHITE ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,415,420 TOY GUN Willard Henry White, 128 Wooded Crest, Waco, Tex. 76710 Filed Feb. 20, 1967, Ser. No. 617,177 Claims. (Cl. 22279) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A top gun having a spring actuate-d projectile and a pump operated multiple shot water discharge mechanism. The multiple shot water mechanism in one embodiment is separate from the spring actuated projectile, and in another embodiment arranged such that the water shots are discharged through a passage in the projectile. With either arrangement, the projectile and water shot can be operated simultaneously or independent of each other.

Background of the invention Small children, especially boys, through the years have exhibited a fascination for suction-cup dart guns and water pistols. Ordinarily, the youngster must be content with enjoying either the dart gun or the water pistol separately. There have been a number of attempts to incorporate into a single toy a dual firing mechanism; however, such attempts usually resulted in an unrealistic and cumbersome toy. In the US. Patent 3,022,779, issued by E. Benkoe, there is described a shotgun-type dual firing gun that is typical of earlier attempts to combine a water gun and a projectile gun.

The present invention provides a gun wherein each water shot has a measured volume that is discharged in a fixed nozzle at the end of the gun barrel. This provides a reasonable degree of accuracy when aiming the water shot at a target. A bellows-type cartridge positioned opposite the discharge end of a long barrel, as described in the above patent, does not provide accurate aiming of a water shot.

The toy gun of this invention also provide-s a spring actuated projectile that is guided during its discharge from the gun barrel. Again, such guidance is not possible by a bellows discharged projectile located opposite the discharge end of a long barrel.

Summary 0 the invention This invention provides a combination spring-actuated projectile gun and multiple-shot water gun having a first passage formed as part of a barrel assembly and terminating at one end thereof, and a second passage terminating in a nozzle also at the barrel end. A handle grip is formed integrally with the barrel assembly and contains a water reservoir in communication with the second passage by means of a trigger operated water pump. The first passage includes a spring for discharging a projectile when a second trigger mechanism is actuated.

A better understanding of the invention and its advantages will be apparent from the specification and claims and from the accompanying drawings illustrative of the invention.

Brief description of the drawings FIGURE 1 is an end elevation of a toy gun embodying this invention;

FIGURE 2 is a section on the line 22 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view of an alternate embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 4 is a cross section of a dart for the embodiment of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view of an alternate embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 6 is a cross section of a dart for the embodiment of FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 7 is a sectional view of the ball check valve of FIGURE 5 with the dart in place; and

FIGURE 8 is a sectional view of the ball check valve of FIGURE 5 after the dart has been fired.

Description of the preferred embodiments Referring to FIGURES 1 and 2, there is shown a toy gun comprising a handle grip 10 formed as an integral part of a barrel assembly 11. The handle grip and barrel are desirably of a lightweight material such as black impact styrene. The gun is constructed by forming a left half section and a right half section and ultrasonically welding the two sections together, after assembly of the various internal components.

The barrel 11 includes a longitudinal passage 12 for receiving a projectile such as a dart 13. One end of the passage 12 terminates in an opening at the barrel end 14. Attached to the innermost end of the passage 12 is a slidably positioned compression spring 16. Pivotally mounted in the lower end of the barrel 11 at the forward edge of the handle grip 10 on a pivot pin 17 is a projectile trigger 18. A trigger guard 19 protects the projectile trigger 18. In operable engagement with an extension arm of the projectile trigger 18 is a latch dog 21 containing a spike 22 as an integral part thereof. The latch dog 21 is mounted to rotate about a pivot pin 23 and is spring loaded by means of a hairpin spring 24 positioned about a pivot pin 26.

In operation, the dart 13 is inserted into the passage 12, against the compression spring 16, until it engages the spike 22 of the latch dog 21. When the spike 22 engages the dart 13, the projectile portion of the gun is cooked and ready to fire. To discharge the dart 13, the projectile trigger 18 is rotated clockwise, about the pivot pin 17, thereby rotating the latch dog 21 counterclockwise about the pivot pin 23. The spike 22 is disengaged from the dart 13 and the energy of the compression spring 16 is released. Expansion of the compression spring 16 forces the dart 13 from the passage 12 and the dart projectile has been fired. A reasonable degree of accuracy is possible with the gun of FIGURE 1, since the passage 12 guides the dart as it is ejected therefrom.

A water nozzle 27, juxtapositioned the opening of the passage 12 in the barrel end 14, connects to the discharge end of a pump 28 by means of a pipe 29. The inlet of the pump 28 is located in a water reservoir 31 formed as an integral part of the handle grip 10'. A water trigger 32, positioned vertically below the projectile trigger 18, connects to and operates the pump 28.

In operation, the reservoir 31 is filled with water by means of a filler plug 33. The water trigger 32 is squeezed, thereby operating the pump 28, and a measured amount of water is discharged through the nozzle 27 from the reservoir 31. The water jet from the nozzle 27 can be aimed with a reasonable degree of accuracy since the nozzle is located in a fixed position at the end of the gun barrel 11.

As illustrated in FIGURE 1, the water nozzle 27 is displaced from the opening of the passage 12 by an amount sufficient to permit independent firing of either the water gun or the dart gun. With the dart 13 loaded into the passage 12, it is possible for a water shot to pass below the suction cup of the dart as illustrated in FIGURE 2.

Referring to FIGURE 3, there is shown another embodiment of the toy gun of this invention. For ease in understanding this description, the same reference numerals will be used throughout where identical elements appear in each of the various figures. A handle grip is formed as an integral part of a barrel assembly 11 that includes two concentrically positioned passages 12 and 34. The passage 12 terminates in an opening at the barrel end 14. A compression spring 16 is fixedly mounted to the innermost end of the passage 12 and is slidably positioned therein. Rotatably mounted about a pivot pin 17, at the lower end of the barrel 11 and the forward edge of the handle grip 10, is a projectile trigger 18. The upper extension of the projectile trigger 18 is in operable communication with a latch dog 21 containing a spike 22. The latch dog 21 pivots about a pivot pin 23 and is spring loaded by means of a hairpin spring 24 fixed in position by means of a pivot pin 26. A trigger guard 19 protects the projectile trigger 18.

The operation of the projectile section of the gun shown in FIGURE 3 is identical to the operation of the projectile section of the gun shown in FIGURE 2.

Again referring to FIGURE 3, the passage 34 is concentrically mounted within the passage 12 and passes through the compression spring 16 and is mounted to a bracket 36. The passage 34 terminates in a water nozzle 37 at the barrel end 14. The innermost end of the passage 34 connects, by means of a pipe 29, to a water pump 28, the inlet of which is located in a water reservoir 31 having a filler plug 33. A Water trigger 32, located below the projectile trigger 18, actuates the pump 28.

Again, the operation of the water shot section of the gun shown in FIGURE 3 is identical to the water shot section of the gun shown in FIGURE 2; however, the dart 38 for use with the gun shown in FIGURE 3 includes a lengthwise passage 35 as shown in FIGURE 4. When the dart 38 of FIGURE 4 is in the cocked position of the gun of FIGURE 3, the nozzle 37 extends through the suction cup of the dart. Independent operation of either the water shot or projectile sections is possible with the gun shown in FIGURE 3. If the dart 38 is in the cocked position in the passage 12, the water shot is discharged through the nozzle 37 without interference from the dart. Again, a certain degree of accuracy is possible when aiming either the dart or the water shot since both are discharged at the barrel end 14.

Referring to FIGURE 5, there is shown another embodiment of the toy gun of this invention. The grip handle 10 is formed as an intergal part of the barrel assembly 11 that includes a longitudinal passage 12. One end of the passage 12 terminates at an opening at the barrel end 14 and the other end includes a ball check valve 39. A compression spring 16 is fixedly mounted to the passage 12 at the ball check valve 39. Rotatably mounted on a pivot pin 17 is a projectile trigger 18 having an upper extension in communication with a latch dog 21 rotatably mounted on a pivot pin 23 and including a spike 22. The latch dog 21 is spring loaded by means of a hairpin spring 24 positioned on a pivot pin 26. A trigger guard 19 protects the projectile trigger 18.

Referring to FIGURE 7, the ball check valve 39 includes a compression spring 41 in engagement with a ball 42 that seals off a passage 43 between the ball check valve and the passage 12. The ball check valve 39 connects, by means of a pipe 29, to a water pump 28 the inlet of which is located in a water reservoir 31 having a filler plug 33. A water trigger 32, positioned below the projectile trigger 18, actuates the water pump 28.

In operation, a dart 44, shown in FIGURE 6, is inserted into the passage 12. The dart 44 is inserted into the passage 12 until it engages the spike 22 of the latch dog 21. In this position, both the water shot and projectile sections of the gun are cocked. Referring to FIG- URE 7, with the dart 44 in its fully inserted position, the innermost end engages the ball 42 and disengages it from the passage 43. The beveled edge 46 of the dart 44 now seals off the passage 43 and opens the center passage 45 to receive water from the pump 28 by means of the pipe 29. Actuating the water trigger 32 causes a measured amount of water to be forced through the pipe 29, past the ball 42, into the dart 44, and out of the nozzle 45. To discharge the dart 44, the projectile trigger 18 is rotated clockwise, thereby disengaging the spike 22 from the dart and allowing the spring 16 to expand and discharge the dart from the passage 12. As the dart 44 leaves the passage 12, it disengages the ball 42 which is returned to its sealing off position by means of the spring 41, as shown in FIGURE 8.

Whereas the projectile section and water shot section of the guns shown in FIGURES 2 and 3 could be operated independently, the water shot section of the gun shown in FIGURE 5 can only be operated with the dart 44 in its cocked position. The same degree of accuracy can be obtained with the gun of FIGURE 5 as is possible with the guns of FIGURES 2 and 3, since the water shot and the projectile are discharged from the barrel end 14.

While several embodiments of the invention, together with modifications thereof, have been described in detail herein and shown in the accompanying drawings, it will be evident that various further modifications are possible in the arrangement and construction of its components without departing from the scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A toy handgun comprising:

a pistol-type barrel assembly including a first passage having an opening at the discharge end of saidbarrel for receiving a projectile, a second passage terminating in a nozzle at the discharge end of said barrel in vertical alignment with the opening of said first passage, handle grip including a trigger guard both formed integral with said barrel, said handle grip including a water reservoir therein,

a first trigger mechanism operable within said trigger guard,

a spring retractably positioned in said first passage for discharging a projectile therefrom when said first trigger mechanism is actuated,

a water pump in communication with said reservoir and connected to said second passage for discharging water from said reservoir through said nozzle, and

a second trigger mechanism operable outside said trigger guard and engaging said water pump, said second trigger mechanism in vertical alignment with said first trigger mechanism and operable independent therefrom.

2. A toy handgun as set forth in claim 1 wherein said second passage includes a flexible pipe connected to said nozzle and said water pump.

3. A toy handgun as set forth in claim 1 including a dart for inserting into said first passage.

4. A toy gun comprising:

a barrel assembly including a first passage terminating at one end of said barrel for receiving a hollow shaft dart therein, and a second passage concentrically mounted within said first passage and terminating in a nozzle at the opening of said first passage,

a handle grip formed as an integral part of said barrel and having a water reservoir therein,

a first trigger mechanism,

a spring retractably mounted in said first passage for discharging a projectile when said trigger mechanism is actuated,

a second trigger mechanism, and

a water pump is communication with said water reservoir and said second passage for discharging water through said nozzle when actuated by said second trigger mechanism.

5. A toy gun comprising:

a barrel assembly having a passage terminating at one end of said barrel for receiving a projectile therein,

a ball check valve connected to said passage opposite said barrel end and actuated by a projectile inserted into said passage,

a handle grip formed integrally with said barrel and including a water reservoir,

a first trigger mechanism,

a spring slidably positioned in said passage for discharging a projectile when said trigger mechanism is actuated,

a second trigger mechanism, and

a water pump in communication with said water reservoir and said ball check valve and actuated by said trigger mechanism to discharge water through a projectile inserted into said passage.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,029,469 6/1912 Schrodel 124-27 2,627,260 2/ 1953 Zimmerman 124-27 2,678,753 5/1954 Hersey 22279 3,022,779 2/1962 Benkoe 22279 X SAMUEL F. COLEMAN, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1029469 *Dec 2, 1911Jun 11, 1912Georg SchroedelToy gun.
US2627260 *Apr 20, 1950Feb 3, 1953Harry ZimmermanMagnetic dart-projecting toy
US2678753 *Oct 29, 1951May 18, 1954Knickerbocker Plastic CompanyToy pistol
US3022779 *Jun 14, 1960Feb 27, 1962Transogram Company IncToy guns
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3786683 *Sep 12, 1972Jan 22, 1974Alphamedics Mfg CorpHand-operated pipette
US4765510 *Apr 7, 1987Aug 23, 1988Rende Vincent NMultiple color fluid dispensing gun
US5377656 *May 10, 1993Jan 3, 1995Tonka CorporationToy gun
US5396877 *Aug 11, 1993Mar 14, 1995Amron; Alan B.Device for converting an air-pressure water gun to a device ejecting projectiles
US6026990 *Oct 1, 1997Feb 22, 2000Brunswig; James A.Holder for aerosol defense spray device
US6658779May 17, 2002Dec 9, 2003Eran Nicodemus BauerWeapon system comprising a firearm and a non-lethal means for selectively ejecting a stream of fluid
US6922931Dec 8, 2003Aug 2, 2005Eran Nicodemus BauerWeapon system comprising a firearm and a non-lethal means for selectively ejecting a stream of fluid
US8529384Feb 25, 2011Sep 10, 2013Shoot The Moon Products Ii, LlcMarker tag darts, dart guns therefor, and methods
US8678877 *Aug 29, 2013Mar 25, 2014Shoot The Moon Products Ii, LlcMarker tag darts, dart guns therefor, and methods
US20120178338 *Jul 26, 2011Jul 12, 2012Mathew Peter MowbrayToy Gun
DE3335436A1 *Sep 30, 1983Apr 25, 1985Schroedel Ideal Sport SpielToy firearm
EP0027571A1 *Sep 29, 1980Apr 29, 1981DULCOP International S.p.A.Water sprinkling toy pistol
WO1997040332A1 *Apr 21, 1997Oct 30, 1997Bauer Gerard MietWeapon system comprising a firearm and a non-lethal means for selectively ejecting a stream of fluid
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/79
International ClassificationF41B9/00, F41B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41B7/003, F41B9/004
European ClassificationF41B9/00B4D2, F41B7/00A