Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3418672 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 31, 1968
Filing dateMay 22, 1962
Priority dateApr 19, 1962
Publication numberUS 3418672 A, US 3418672A, US-A-3418672, US3418672 A, US3418672A
InventorsRegan Patrick J
Original AssigneeD B A Products Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bowling lane maintenance device
US 3418672 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 31, 1968 p, J, REGAN 3,418,672

BOWLING LANE MAINTENANCE DEVICE Filed May 22, 1962 Sheet 1 of 6 INVENTOR 328 PATRICK J. REGAN ATTORNEYS Dec. 31, 1968 J, REGAN 3,418,672

BOWLING LANE MAINTENANCE DEVICE Filed May 22, 1962 Sheet 2 of 6 V Y 346' I00 L94 9 INVENTOR PATRICK J. REGAN 5a 34 58 Y A [3M ATTORNEYS P. J. REGAN BOWLING LANE MAINTENANCE DEVICE Dec. 31, 1968 Filed May 22, 1962 Sheet INVENTOR PATRICK J. REGAN ATTORNEYS Dec. 31, 1968 P, J, REGAN BOWLING LANE MAINTENANCE DEVICE Filed may 22, 1962 Sheet FIG. 7

-|NVENTOR PATRICK J. REGAN BY fiA/Z/WL, W!

ATTORNEYS 1968 P. J. REGAN BOWLING LANE MAINTENANCE DEVICE Sheet 5 of '6 Filed May 22. 1962 INVENTOR P m F U Ill/ll ll PATR [CK J. REGAN Ill/ll [1/ III] ATTORNEYS Dec. 31, 1968 I PQJ. REGA'N 3,418,672

BOWLING LANE MAINTENANCE DEVICE Filed May 22, 1962 Sheet 6 of 6 SPRAY JETS (SOLENOIDS) 344 344 CLUTCH 338 ns V.A.C.

REVERSRBLE MOTOR MOTOR SPRAY DR'VE SWITCH SW'TCH MOTOR INVENTOR SWITCH PATRICK J. REGAN FIG. l4 BY finrm ATTORNEY-S United States Patent 3,418,672 BGWLING LANE MAINTENANCE DEVICE Patrick J. Regan, Elm Grove, Wis., assignor to D.B.A. Products Company, Inc, Deerfield, 111., a corporation of Illinois Filed May 22, 1962, Ser. No. 196,769 Claims priority, application Australia, Apr. 19, 1962, 16,801/ 62 l-Claims. (Cl. -98) This invention relates to surface conditioning machines and specifically to machines of this class which are useful for cleaning, dressing, bufiing and polishing the lanes of a bowling establishment.

The regular cleaning and dressing of bowling lanes are important tasks not only for proper maintenance and protection of the lane surfaces but also to establish good scoring conditions. The usual bowling lane surface is prepared by finely sanding the wood surface and covering the sanded surface with several coats of lacquer. The lacquer coated surface is then regularly dressed by applying a light lubricant, mineral oil or other material of appropriate composition. The dressing is applied to provide a protective finish over the lacquer which will minimize marking of the lane surfaces. It also assists and acts as a cleansing agent to remove black marks, scuffs and the like which are inevitably produced during use of the lanes. However, an equally important function of the dressing is the effect it has on the action of the ball. In accordance with the composition of the dressing and the amount applied, the dressing plays a definite role in the amount of control the bowler is able to exercise over the travel of the ball as it moves down the lane in response to his delivery of the ball.

The National Bowling Council recommends that cleaning and dressing of the bowling lanes be carried out daily. Where the use of the lanes is particularly heavy it is important that they be wiped oftener than once a day. conventionally this has been done manually and, because of the time involved, it has had to be done in off-hours or at the sacrifice of the time available for operation of the lanes. The operation is not only expensive because of the many man-hours required but the results thereof have been far from satisfactory.

conventionally the lanes have been cleaned and prepared for bowling by first wiping the surface with an appropriate cloth or dusting mop. Then while the operator is walking backwards from the pin deck and holding a hand pump spray gun at near knee level, he sprays a fog of dressing over the lane surface. After allowing possibly twenty minutes for the dressing to settle to the surface, the surface is then buffed with burlap, with or without a rotary buifer, going up and down the lane surface until a sufiicient finish is apparent. This is often followed by wiping the surface with a polishing cloth to remove excess dressing material. A major difficulty with the op eration was that no lane was ever treated the same way twice. Moreover the suitability of the surface depended not only on the skill of the maintenance man but also on the attention he gave to the job. As a natural growth of such practices, it has come to be expected by the average bowler that some lanes will be fast, and others will be slow, stiff or loose. The average bowlers experience is that not only when bowling on different nights but when bowling in alternate alleys on the same night he must readjust his delivery to the particular characteristics of that lane for that particular period of bowling time and his scoring ability is due at least in some measure to his ability to quickly adapt himself to different lane conditions.

Thus a principal object of the present invention is to provide novel apparatus and an improved method of cleaning and/or treating the lane surfaces so that not only can they be cared for quickly and economically with a minimum of lost time but in a manner so that each lane each time will be cleaned, dressed and buffed in exactly the same manner, the same amount of dressing applied and essentially exactly the same surface conditions produced whereby every lane in a bowling establishment will have a bowling surface that is not only predictable but uniformly good.

In accordance with this object of the invention, apparatus is provided which is electrically driven at a constant rate of speed and can be moved in both a forward and reverse direction. Such a machine is provided with surface cleaning means which can be used to pick up old dressing, dirt and grime as the machine is moved from the foul line toward the pin deck. The machine can then be returned to the foul line without being turned around and used to apply a correct amount of dressing at a constant rate from a constant height and while using the aforesaid cleaning means to buff and polish the dressed surface.

It is a feature of the invention that an entire cleaning and dressing operation can be accomplished in one pass down the lane from the foul line to the pin deck and return, with the entire operation being completed in approximately seconds per lane. In actual experience it has been found that where it has been customary to take approximately five hours to dust, dress and buff sixteen lanes properly by hand, in accordance with the present invention the same work can be obtained in less than 30 minutes, or ten times faster, and with considerably more satisfactory results. Not only are the lanes cleaned, dressed and buffed in considerably less time, but the entire operation can be done by one of little skill or experience and, at the same time, obtaining results that could not be equalled by even the most skilled.

In its preferred form, the invention contemplates a wheeled vehicle beneath which is supported a suitable means for applying dressing across the width of the lane. Forwardly of the dressing applicator, the vehicle also supports a surface dusting member and behind it a rotatable bufling cylinder both of which also span the entire Width of the lane and are adapted to be controlled by appropriately located means for locating the same into and out of operative position.

One feature of the invention is that both the butting cylinder and the lane wiper are supported between appropriate frames the supporting frame for the wiper being hinged or pivoted to the frame which supports the bufling cylinder for free swinging movement within a limited angle whereby, in pivoting the buffing cylinder sup-porting frame, both may be raised to an inoperative position or both lowered to an operative posiiton. In an intermediate position, the =bufling cylinder may be held out of engagement with the lane surface so that the duster will be alone disposed in engagement with the floor as in a wiping operation.

Another feature of the invention is the novel construction of a bufiing member which is not only eflicient in its operation, essentially self-cleaning but also economical to manufacture and convenient to use.

Thus in a preferred form of the invention the bufling cylinder comprises a core of pressed fibre board, cardboard, etc. which is coated with a suitable material to render it resistant to the dressing composition and about which is spirally wound and adhesively secured a flat band of non-woven fibrous material such as nylon.

The invention further contemplates that this core will comprise a replaceable item which may be slipped over a permanent supporting cylinder of rigid construction releasably supported in an appropriate frame on the machine.

The invention also contemplates a novel construction of surface wiping or polishing member comprising a length of wiping material provided in roll form so that it may be supported on an appropriate frame, a portion thereof drawn beneath a bar having a resilient underside and wound onto a take-up roll. The mounting for the take-up roll is provided with manipulatable means such as a ratchet which may be remotely operated to turn the take-up roll to permit presentation of fresh material beneath the resilient sided bar for the cleaning and/ or polishing operation as it is required.

Still another feature of the invention is the novel construction of mounting means by which both the feed roll of wiping material and take-up roll are releasably sup ported on their supporting frame.

A particularly important feature of the invention is the novel construction of dressing applicator which is provided. Thus a machine in accordance with the inven tion is also provided with a plurality of downwardly directed jets mounted within a hood. These jets are at an appropriate height and spaced apart an appropriate distance, and so adapted to apply the dressing material in the form of a fog throughout the width of the bowling lane within the dimensions of the hood and so that there is essentially no delay to allow for settling while at the same time the amount of dressing applied per square foot of lane surface is accurately determinable.

Still another feature of the invention is that the dressing application may be so carefully and accurately regulated that the bufi'lng and polishing actions will immediately follow the dressing application and constitute a part of the same machine and/ or operation.

To this end, a further object and/or feature of the invention is to provide a novel and improved means and method of conditioning the surface of a bowling lane which comprises applying dressing material, preferably. in atomized form, across the width of the lane from a fixed and unwavering height and at a constant rate while proceeding down the lanes at a predetermined constant speed and simultaneously buffing and/or polishing the surface of the lane across its width immediately behind the application of the dressing.

In accordance with the invention the jets or spraying units are of a construction so that the amount of dressing may be easily regulated, so that the jets are capable of ejecting a controlled, regulatable spray of dressing onto the surface of the lanes and only when the vehicle is being driven in a reverse direction, that is in a direction away from the pin deck toward the foul line. This has the advantage that there can be no accidental application of dressing during the cleaning operation as the machine is moved down the lane toward the pin deck. It also obviates the need of turning the machine around. This means also that the operator precedes the dressing application so that he need not walk on the dressed surface and the means employed to clean the bowling lane surface are also located in their most advantageous sequence to do the buffing and polishing operations.

Still another feature of the invention is a novel construction of spray jets in which the dressing fiuid is siphoned from a central reservoir of dressing fluid by the employment of a continuous stream of air forced through the jets and which siphoning action can be interrupted by a solenoid-operated valve to shut off the supply of dressing fluid and to obtain an essentially immediate dripless condition.

Still another feature of the invention is that the buffing action is accomplished by a continuously rotating cylinder which extends across the entire width of the lane and is of a construction to gently and evenly massage the lane dressing into the surface of the lane which ensures that not only is the entire surface buffed, that is no portions are missed, but also avoids the creation of uneven bufling patterns and whereby there is a complete uniformity of buffed surface across every lane and of uniform intensity.

Many other objects, advantages and features of the invention, both in apparatus and method, will be apparent from the description of a preferred form of the invention which will now be described. In connection with the following description it will be understood that many changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention as it is defined in the appended claims.

Referring therefore now to the drawings:

FIGURE 1 illustrates a bowling lane maintenance machine embodying one form of the invention in its position of use on a bowling lane;

FIGURE 2 illustrates the machine with its handle folded against the body thereof and the machine turned on its rear side for transportation from one lane to another and/ or for storage;

FIGURE 3 is a rear view of the machine;

FIGURE 4 is a bottom plan view thereof;

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view of the machine with the cowling removed and portions fragmented for convenience of illustration;

FIGURE 6 is a somewhat more fragmented view, generally similar to FIGURE 5, taken from the opposite side of the machine;

FIGURE 7 is a view, partially fragmented, taken along line 77 of FIGURE 6 and illustrates details in the construction of the duster and its supporting structure;

FIGURE 8 is a view taken along lines 88 of FIG- URE 7 looking in the direction indicated by the arrows;

FIGURE 9 is a fragmented view of a section taken through the bufiing roller and its supporting structure to illustrate details in construction thereof;

FIGURE 10 is an end view taken along lines 101tl of FIGURE 9 looking in the direction indicated by the arrows and illustrates the means employed for releasably locking the bufiing cylinder in position on its supporting structure;

FIGURE 11 illustrates details of the lever means employed for raising and lowering the buffing cylinder and duster into and out of operative engagement with the lane surface;

FIGURE 12 is a fragmented view which illustrates the drive means including the clutch arrangement for operating the machine and its components;

FIGURE 13 is a partially fragment-ed sectional view taken through one of the spray jets to illustrate details in construction thereof; and

FIGURE 14 is a schematic wiring diagram of the illustrated embodiment.

Referring more specifically to the several views which comprise the drawings and wherein like parts are identified by like reference numerals, and first to FIGURES 1 through 5, a preferred embodiment of the invention is there illustrated as embodied in a device or machine 20 comprising a duster or wiping member indicated generally at 22, a buffer indicated generally at 24, and a spray applicator at 26, the latter comprising a hood 28 and a plurality of spaced jets 30 mounted in the top wall thereof through which dressing material is projected in the form of a fine mist or fog onto the surface of the bowling lane. In accordance with the invention, the cluster, buffer and spray applicator are of a length to operate at one time across the entire width of the bowling lane and are arranged in the indicated order so that the invention may be practiced by moving the machine down a lane toward the pin deck with the duster in operative position to wipe the lane surface and then be returned without turning the machine around to apply dressing to the lane surface, then buff and polish the buffed surface, the duster also being adapted for the latter function.

Details in the construction of the duster, buffer, dressing applicator and structure by which they may be most advantageously utilized in a machine or method according to the invention will now be described.

Considering FIGURES 3, 4 and 5, machine 20 is illustrated as comprising a strength-imparting, transversely extending channel bar 32 over which a mounting plate 34 is centrally arranged and secured by weldments or other appropriate means, the mounting plate 34 having a downwardly flanged edge 36 to which the hood 28 of the dressing applicator is secured by bolts or other appropriate means. Mounting plate 34 has a transverse width less than the length of the channel bar 32 and is provided wtih depending portions 36 along its two sides adapted to receive and support bearing journals 38 in which is rotatably mounted an axle 40 having rubbertired drive wheels 42 mounted on the ends thereof to turn with rotation of said axle. To the rear of said drive wheels 42 are a pair of rigid casters 44, said casters having mounting brackets 46 by which they are bolted in place to the underside of plate 34. Fixed about or integral with mounting plate 34 are rear wall 48 and a pair of trapezoidal-shaped sidewalls 50, the latter providing means to which a U-bent operators handle 52 of tubular metal stock has its two ends pivotally connected as at 54 (FIG. 5).

As illustrated in FIGURE 5, for example, the major length of the handle is inclined upwardly to a convenient height, a substantial portion of the handle adjacent its pivotally connected ends being horizontally disposed. in the normal position of the handle, whereby an inclined force directed against the handle by the operator will be translated to a horizontal force on pivots 54 to move the machine across the fioor without rocking the handle about said pivots. When not in use or when moving the machine from one location to another as for example, between lanes, the machine may be stood on its rear side by pivoting it on bumpers 58 provided along the rear lower edge of mounting panel 34. As seen in FIG- URE 3, the rear wall 48 of said panel 34 is provided with a plurality of swivel casters indicated generally at 60 which are appropriately mounted to said Wall by any convenient means whereby the machine may be conveniently moved when in said end-position. In FIGURE 2 the machine is shown in such an end-position and with its handle 52 folded back against the cowling 56 so that it may be transported by means of the casters 60 and stored, occupying a minimum of floor area.

Although conceivably, the machine could be manually pushed or pulled along the bowling lane, a feature of the invention is that the machine is operated at a constant speed. This factor coupled with the control exercised over the amount of dressing fluid ejected from the nozzles of spray jets 30 assure that application of dressing fluid over the lane surface will be uniform. For this purpose a reversible electric gear motor 62 is employed and is connected to a convenient source of electrical power 96 (FIG. 14) by means of a long extension cord 64. In FIG- URE 5 gear motor 62 is shown mounted in the rear right hand corner of mounting plate 34 and has its arbor drivingly connected to rotate a shaft 66 by means of a V- belt 68 extending about sheave 70 fixed on clutch drive shaft 66. as the arbor of the motor turns.

Turning now to FIGURE 12 considered with FIG- URE 5, shaft 66 is journalled in a pair of bearings 72 supported by upright brackets 74 which are welded or otherwise secured to mounting plate 34. At its right hand end, drive shaft 66 supports a magnetic clutch 76 of conventional construction. Said clutch 76 comprises a first clutch member 78 keyed at 80 to rotate with shaft 66. Rotatably supported on the outboard side of said first clutch member 78 is a member='82 carrying magnets 84. To the inboard side of first clutch member 78 is a clutch plate 86 keyed to clutch sprocket 88 which is disposed to freely rotate about shaft 66 and is drivingly connected with a sprocket gear 90 on axle 40 by means of drive chain 92.

Now referring to FIGURE 14, 94 represents a switch which when closed completes a circuit from the power source 96 through DC rectifier 98 so as to energize magnets 84 of clutch 76. When magnets 84 are energized,

they cause plate 86 to move axially into frictional engagement with the first clutch member 78 so that r tational movement of shaft 66 is then imparted through clutch member 78, clutch plate 86, sheave 88, drive chain 92 and sprocket 90 to turn axle 40 and wheels 42 fixed to the ends thereof. As mentioned above, motor 62 is of the reversible type and as is illustrated in FIG- URE 14 is so wired to motor switch 160 that in one position of switch 100 a first circuit is completed to the motor 62 which causes it to turn in one direction, in a second position of switch, a second circuit is completed which causes the motor to turn in a reverse direction. In an intermediate position of switch 100 the motor will turn in neither direction and remains stopped. Also as indicated in FIGURE 14, motor switch 100 and drive switch 94 are so coupled by means 162 that switch 94 cannot complete a circuit to operate clutch until and unless motor switch 100 is also set in a position to complete one of said two mentioned motor circuits. Thus although drive switch 94 is conveniently utilized to stop and start movement of machine 20, the setting of the direction of said movement by switch 100 is a condition precedent. The advantages resulting from this coupling will be apparent as the construction and operation of the machine and its components is further discussed.

Turning now to the duster and buffer, their construc tion and mounting on machine 20, FIGURE 5, shows a pair of pivot blocks 104 secured in spaced relation along the forward edge of mounting plate 34. In the upper ends of said blocks 164 are journalled a pivot shaft 106 which supports a pair of forwardly projecting spaced pivot arms 108. To said arms are bolted a cross member 110 having depending members 112, 114 at the ends thereof which comprise supporting brackets for a drive shaft 116 and stub shaft 118 on which a bufi'lng cylinder 120 is rotatably supported.

Referring particularly to FIGURE 9, the but-Ting cylinder 120 is seen to comprise a supporting cylinder 126 over which is slipped a buffing sleeve consisting of a main core 122 and an outer buffing layer 124. The main core 122 is preferably formed of pressed fibers, cardboard or other appropriate material and has its outer surface coated with a thickness of phenoplast resin such as phenol formaldehyde or other phenolic resin which will inhibit disintegration or destruction of the core material by the dressing composition. The outer bufl'ing layer 124 is an unwoven fine fibrous material, preferably nylon, selected for its long-wearing properties, and general resistance to the dressing compounds. The bufi'ing layer is formed by wrapping a narrow band (approximately 5 inches wide) of the nylon fibrous material in spiral form about the phenolic resin coated surface of the cardboard core 122 and adhesively securing it thereto by a neoprene base or other suitable adhesive which will be resistant to break-down in the presence of the dressing compound. The aforesaid construction of bufiing cylinder has been found to impart an entirely satisfactory buffing action without becoming saturated with the dressing. This means that there is no problem of the buffer carrying dressing into unwanted areas of the bowling lane after the spray applicator has been shut off.

Referring to FIGURE 9, a preferred means and arr-angement for detachably mounting the bufiing cylinder 120 and its sleeve on the U-supporting frame which cross member 110 and brackets 112, 114 comprise will now be described. As illustrated in said figure, 116 represents a drive shaft rotatably journalled in bracket 114 by means of a suitable bearing race 128 held between a retainer ring 129 on the outboard side of race 128 and the hub of drive plate 132 which is pinned to shaft 116 by pin 130. Drive plate 132 is provided with a plurality of axially extending pins 134 which are spaced apart so as to be aligned with and fit into openings 136 provided in an end plate 138 which fit within one end of cylinder 126. Preferably end plate 138 is provided with a pair of diametrically opposed projections at its periphery which provide a limit for both the cylinder126 and core 122 of its sleeve. Core 122 is notched at 141 to receive said projections. However the butfing layer 124 is extended to the edge of the core so as to cover projections 140 seated in notches 141 and prevent the possibility of their marking the lane surface. Cylinder 126 is also pinned to end plate 138 as at 142.

The opposite end of cylinder 126 is supported by means of stub shaft 118 which has a hexagonal-shaped inboard end mounted in a similarly shaped socket 145 of bearing connection member 146 which is press fitted into end plate 144, said end plate 144 being suitably recessed at 148 to provide a seat for said end of cylinder 126. End plate 144 unlike the end plate 138 is, however, so dimensioned that its diameter does not exceed the external diameter of the cylinder 126.

This is to allow core 122 of the buffing sleeve to be slipped past the end plate 144 as in removing a worn sleeve and replacing it by a new one. Means in the form of washers 150 held in overlapping relation with the end of core 122 by bolts 152 threaded into suitable openings provided in end plate 144 serve to lock the sleeve on cylinder 126 and prevent its sliding on its supporting cylinder 126, the opposite end of core 122 being held by the notched positions 144 thereof which interfit with projections 140 of plate 138. The opposite end of stub shaft 118 passes through a suitable opening in supporting bracket 112 and is held by means of a swing lock 154 having a cut out portion 156 which engages in a recess 158 provided adjacent the outboard end of stub shaft 118. As seen best in FIGURE 10, one end of swing lock 154 is pivotally connected by bolt 161 to bracket 112 and its opposite end is turned outwardly to provide a lip 159 which interfits with an axially flattened portion 160 of shaft 118 to the outboard side of its recess 158. Thus by tightening bolt 161 with swing lock 154 in the position illustrated by FIGURE 10, it will prevent both axial and rotational movement of shaft 118 and so hold the bufiing cylinder 120 securely in place.

When it is necessary to replace the bufiing sleeve 1224, this is accomplished by first loosening bolt 161 to allow pivoting of swing lock 154 out of its locking position in recess 158. Stub shaft 118 may be then slid through the opening in bracket 112 which supports it to dislodge the inner end of shaft 118 from its seat in socket 145 of the bearing connection member 146. Bufl'ing cylinder 120 can be then moved to the right, sufficient clearance being provided between the right hand end of cylinder 120 and bracket 112 which allows its end plate 138 to be disengaged from pins 134 of drive hub 132. The cylinder 120 may be then dropped past said pins. The buffing sleeve may be then separated from cylinder 126 by removing bolts 152 and washers 150. To reassemble the bufiing cylinder on brackets, the reverse procedure is followed.

Drive shaft 116 as previously mentioned, is permanently mounted on bracket 114 and is provided on its outboard end with a suitable sheave 162 so as to be rotated by means of drive chain (FIG. 5) 164 driven by sheave 166 on the end of shaft 66. The bufiing cylinder is therefore driven directly by gear motor 62 and not through clutch 76. Moreover, the direction of rotation of the buffer corresponds to the direction in which shaft 66 is turned by the gear motor. so that the buffer may be usefully employed in either direction of operation of the machine 20 and actually can be used whether the machine is power or manually propelled.

Referring now to FIGURE 7 considered with FIGURE 5, a pair of double-bent lever arms 170, 172 are illustrated mounted at their upper end to turn about pivots 174 at the top of supporting brackets 114, 112. The lower ends of double-bent lever arms 170, 172 form flanges 178 to which are bolted the ends of a duster bar 176 having a piece of soft lanell, rubber or other resilient material 180 adhesively secured about the underside of said duster bar 176. Desirably, a tie brace 182 joins said arms 170, 172 adjacent their upper pivotally connected ends. Rather than relying on the soft lanell piece 180 itself, which would quickly become dirty, to wipe and/or polish the surf-ace of the bowling lane over which the machine is driven, it is preferred to utilize a piece of non-woven cotton waste or other suitable wiping or polish cloth over the lanell which can be used and discarded when it is dirtied. For this purpose it is convenient to provide a feed roll at 184 comprising a length of clean wiping cloth which is passed beneath the lanell piece 180 and rolled onto a take-up roll 186 as a fresh piece of cloth is required. The two rolls are of similar construction comprising a wooden core of uniform diameter having one end diametrically slotted as at 210 for reasons which will be made clear.

On the inner side of supporting arm are a pair of spring cups 188 secured to one end of a pair of shafts 190 which extend through suitable apertures 192 provided in the two bends of said supporting arm 170, the inner side of said bends each having a cavity at 194 of a diameter large enough to receive said spring cups. In said cavity are compression springs 196 having one end about a reduced section 198 of the cups 188 and their opposite end about a raised portion 200 in the base of cavity 194 about aperture 192, the ends of shafts 192 being provided with suitable retaining washers at 202 which limit the expansion force of springs 196. Cups 188 serve to receive one end of the mandrel or wooden core of the feed and take-up rolls 184, 186. The opposite end of feed roll 184 is supported in the end of a brake cup 204 and the opposite end of take-up roll 186 is supported in an index cup 206. Said two cups 204 and 206 are similarly located on the insides of the bends of arm 172 in alignment with corresponding spring cups 188 on the inner side of arm 170. Each of said cups 204 and 206 are provided with a transversely extending pin 208 with which the slot 210 in the ends of wooden cores 184 or 186 mate (FIG. 8) so as to prevent turning of the rods in their supporting cups. Brake cup 204 is provided with a threaded shaft 212 which may be integral therewith. Shaft 212 passes through a provided opening 214 in arm 172 and is held in place by a washer 216 and nut 218 threadedly connected on the end of member 212. Supported about shaft 212 between cup 204 and the inner side of arm 172 are Belleville washers 220 which act as a brake or tension means to inhibit the free turning of cup 204. Cup 206 is threadedly connected to one end of a stub shaft member 222 which extends through opening 224 in arm 172. Shaft member 222 has an enlarged head 226 of hexagonal shape and on either side of which are rotatably supported portions 233 of a ratchet 230. A nut 228 threadedly connected to the end of shaft member 222 serves to hold ratchet portion 233 against the outer side of arm 172 and thereby cup 206 on arm 172. Between cup 206 and the inner side of arm 172 are Belleville washers 236 which act as tensioning means and/ or as a brake to provide resistance to the turning of cup 206. Unlike member 212, the peripheral surface of the portion of shaft 222 in opening 224 is smooth to permit its free turning therein limited only by the resistance thereto which the Belleville washers 236 provide. The Belleville washers 220 and 236 thus serve to hold the wiping material taut against the lanell piece on dusting bar 176. To move fresh portions of the wiping cloth into position beneath the lanell 180, it is necessary to turn take-up roll 186. This is accomplished by means of ratchet 230. As illustrated by FIG- URES 5 and 7 ratchet 230 is provided with an operating arm 234 and pawl 235 which engages a side of head 226 of shaft 222 so that when operating arm 234 is turned in a clockwise direction, for example, the pawl will engage a side of head 226 so as to rotate shaft 222 and cup 208 attached thereto. However, on the return stroke of arm 234, in a counter-clockwise direction, pawl 235 moves freely over the sides of member 226. Thus, referring to FIGURE 5, it will be seen that arm 234 of the ratchet is conveniently connected by an index cable 238 which extends through a protective sheave 240 and is connected to an indexing lever member 244 mounted by bracket 246 on handle 52. By pulling on lever 244, the ratchet 230 will operate to turn cup 208 and the take-up roll 186 attached thereto so as to move fresh portions of wiping cloth into position beneath lanell piece 180 of bar 176. Lever 244 is then pushed into its initial position to return ratchet arm 234 to its starting position. The aforementioned Belleville washers 220 and 236 serve as brakes or tensioning means which afford a resistance to the turning of cups 204 and 208 so as to effectively hold the wiping material taut about the cluster bar 176; however the amount of tension they exert is sufficiently low that it may be overcome by operation of ratchet 230 as aforementioned.

As thus discussed, it will be apparent that buffing cylinder 120 is free to rest by the force of gravity on the surface of the bowling lane over which the machine is driven as is also the dusting bar 176. Means are, however, provided by which the buffing cylinder either alone or with the duster bar may be raised to an inoperative position out of engagement with the surface of the bowling lane. Referring to FIGURE 11 considered with FIGURE 5, such means comprise a first member 250 comprising an L-plate having a hub portion 251 on its opposite side which fits over and is fixed to one end of pivot shaft 106 so that it rotates with shaft 106. Pivotally connected at 253 to the forward end of said arm 250 is a lever arm 252 which extends axially of plate 250 and through vertical slot 254 in a plate 256 (FIG. 3), having a foot pedal 258 on its opposite end with an upright lip 259. Projecting from one side of lever arm 252 is a projection 260 for engagement by the end of a set screw 262 adjustably mounted in the horizontal portion 264 of the L-shaped plate 250 when lever arm is pivoted about 253 by a force exerted on pedal 258. The pivotal action of lever arm 252 is thus conveniently transferred to arm 250 in order to rotate pivot shaft 106 and thereby raise the butfing cylinder 120 off the surface beneath the machine. The angle through which lever arm 252 is moved to effect raising and lowering of the buffing cylinder may be conveniently adjusted by the setting of screw 262 and is ordinarily adjusted so that the arcuate path of its movement misses the adjacently-located hood 28 of the spray applicator 26. In order that the aforedescribed pivoting of the bufling cylinder about shaft 106 may be utilized to also raise the duster bar 176, a pair of set screws 266 are adjustably mounted on brackets 268 secured to arms 170 and 172 and so as to engage the adjacent top surfaces 267 of frame 110. Set screws 266 thus permit a limited free pivotal movement of arms 170, 172 about their pivotal connections 174. At the same time in accordance with the set adjustment of set screws 266, a height will be reached in the raising of supporting frame 110 where its surfaces 267 will engage the set screws 266 so that, as the frame 110 is raised to further heights it will also carry arms 170, 172 with it and so as to raise the duster bar to a position out of engagement with the surface beneath the machine.

Referring now to FIGURE 3, slot 254 in plate 256 is provided with a pair of cut-outs at 272 and 274 vertically spaced to one side thereof and below the top of slot 254. As illustrated in FIGURE 5, lever arm 252 is also tensioned by a spring 276 so that it will engage within either of said cut-outs 272 and 274 when aligned therewith. Cut-onts 272, 274 and the top of slot 254 are so related that when the lever arm 252 is located at the top of the slot 254, lever arm 252 will be at an angle in which both the butting cylinder 120 and the dusting bar 22 will be free, by the force of gravity of their own weight and that of their supporting structure, to engage the fioor surface. In this position of lever arm 252, both the duster and buffer are in operating positions. As

aforedescribed, to raise either the buffer or both it and the duster off the lane surface, lever arm 252 is actuated by stepping on pedal 258. When the lever arm 252 has been lowered to a position aligned with the upper cutout 272, pivot shaft 106 has been turned sufliciently to raise frame 110 to a height where the buffing cylinder will be out of engagement with the surface beneath. The cylinder 120 may be held at this height by allowing the force of spring 276 to pull lever arm into cut-out 272. In this intermediate position of lever arm 252 the duster is however still in engagement with the surface beneath, as explained above. To also raise the cluster to an inoperative position, the pedal end of lever arm 252 must be finally depressed to where it will engage in cutout 274. The upturned lip 259' on pedal 258 provides means against which the force may be applied by the side of the operators foot to resist the force of spring 276 either in moving the lever arm 252 past cut-out 272 or in overcoming the force of the spring to move the lever arm out of either cut-out 272 or 274.

Although in its broader aspects any suitable form of applicating means may be utilized to distribute dressing fluid across the width of the bowling lane, the most satisfactory results are obtained if only thin coatings are applied and if the coatings are of uniform density. This is conveniently accomplished in accordance with the present invention by utilizing a plurality of spray nozzles or jets 30 each located close to the lane surface and connected by appropriate tubing to an air compressor so as to direct an adjustable stream of air out through the nozzle of each jet 30. The movement of the air stream may be thus relied upon to siphon dressing from an appropriately located supply of dressing fluid and to dispense the dressing as a fine mist or spray onto the lane surface beneath the machine. In accordance with the objects of the invention as referred to above, the invention also contemplates that the amount of dressing distributed through the spray nozzles can be accurately regulated, and furthermore, that the supply of dressing can be controlled so that dressing can be applied only when the machine is being operated in a reverse direction, that is, only after it has been moved down the bowling lane to clean the lane surface from the foul line to the pin deck and the lane surface is ready to be dressed. Since the operator will normally locate himself at handle 52 to operate the switches, this also prevents application of the dressing fluid when the operator would be in a position to track the freshly applied dressing.

Referring first to FIGURE 13, a preferred form of spraying units or jets for applying the dressing fluid is illustrated. Such a unit indicated generally at 30 comprises a first valve body 280 having a threaded port 282 into which is threadedly connected a stem 284 having an elongated narrow bore 286. Port 282 communicates through a narrow passage 288 with a valve closure containing cavity 290. Stern 284 is only partially threaded .into port 282 so that its bore 286 has communication with said passage 288. Valve body 280 also has a second port 292 disposed at right angles to port 282 having a passage 294 which establishes communication between the inner end of port 292 and the aforementioned valve receiving cavity 290. Port 292 is internally threaded to receive a fitting by which it may be connected through suitable tubing 295, to a reservoir of dressing fluid. This reservoir may comprise a bottle 296 (FIG. 5) removably mounted in an appropriate holder 298 fixed on one end of channel bar 32, the cap 300 of said bottle being provided with the usual extension 302 by which the tubing 295 establishes communication with, adjacent the bottom of the bottle 296 for maximum siphoning of its contents.

Referring again to FIGURE 13, the lower end of stem 284 is threadedly connected into one end of the threaded bore 304 of a fitting 306. Into the opposite end of said bore 304 is threadedly connected a fluid nozzle 308 having a narrow bore 310 in aligned communicating relation with bore 286 of stem 284, bore 310 having a restricted orifice 312. In nozzle 308 at spaced intervals about bore 310 are provided a plurality of convergingly directed spaced passages 314 which communicate at their upper end with an annular recess 316 in fitting 306 and communicating with an internally threaded port 318. Port 318 connects with a source of compressed air as is later described. The lower ends of said passages 314 exit into a chamber 320 defined by a second nozzle member 322 secured to the fluid nozzle member 308 by a retainer ring 324 threadedly connected to nozzle 308. Chamber 320 has a generally conical wall 321 which directs the air from 314 into restricted area 323. Orifice 312 projects slightly into said area 323 with which it is aligned leaving a restricted annular space thereabout through which the compressed air passes from chamber 320 for mixing with dressing from orifice 312 and outwardly into restricted orifice 325 of nozzle 322. The stream of air thus exiting from orifice 325 draws dressing fluid from orifice 312 in a siphoning action from bottle 296, breaking it into fine particles and so that it is distributed through the stream passing out orifice 325 onto the surface beneath. As previously mentioned, the spraying units or jets are mounted at spaced intervals in the top wall of hood 28. 328 represents a gasket which surrounds a provided opening in the wall of hood 28 through which retainer ring 324 extends and 330 is a locknut by which the unit 30 is securely fastened to the hood wall. It will be understood that although the spraying units 30 are directed generally downwardly it may be necessary that their nozzles be angled slightly so that the pattern of their spray will clear the drive wheels 40. It will also be understood that the hood 26 will have its front and rear walls angled to accommodate their spray pattern.

, Referring now to FIGURE 5, dash lines 332 represent the tubing which is connected at one end by an appropriate fitting into port 318 and at their opposite end to manifold 334 of an air compressor 336 operated by motor 338. Both motor 338 and air compressor 336 are securely mounted on plate 34 by any appropriate means. Operation of motor 338 therefore delivers compressed air through manifold 334 and communicating tubing 332 into recess 316 of fitting 306 of the spray units 30, through passages 314 and out exit 325 of nozzle 322. As previously described the thus delivered air also entrains dressing fluid from bore 310 via orifice 312 in nozzle 308, the amount of dressing fluid it entrains being determined by the amount of pressure of the air delivered to chamber 320 and exiting at 325. This is regulatable by means of a spring loaded poppet valve 340' provided on the manifold 334 having an adjustable member 341 which may be operated to vary the amount of air released to the atmosphere. Preferably the poppet valve will be adjusted to deliver about .2 ounce of fluid per minute through the three nozzles, the nozzles being set at about 6 inches above the lane surface and so as to cover the entire 42 inch width of the lanes but with no material overlap of spray pattern from the several jets. This adjustment has been found to provide a coating on the lane surface of about the right amount when the machine is driven at the rate of 100 feet per minute. Conceivably the poppet valve 340 may be set for other amounts up to a maximum of 3.0 ounces.

Referring now to FIGURE 14 compressor motor 338 is illustrated as wired into the gear motor circuit so that it will operate only when motor switch 100 is set for the machine 20 to be powered in its reverse direction. The supply of dressing fluid however is under the control of a valve closure illustrated at 342, which is normally biased by spring 342 into a closed position on seat 345 about passage 288. In this position of the closure the dressing fluid supply is cut off. Means in the form of a solenoid 344 are provided which may be energized by depressing switch 346 (FIG. 14) to raise closure 340 against the action of spring 342 so as to reestablish communication between bore 286 and the fluid dressing supply. Preferably switch 346 is of the hold down type so that the dressing fluid will be applied only during the interval the operator is depressing the switch. Immediately upon his release of switch 346 the spray action will cease. However, the air compressor continues to operate. The continued flow of air through nozzle 325 clears the nozzle orifice 325 as well as area 323 of dressing fluid so that there is no problem of dripping. Neither does the nozzle clog. Because spray switch 346 is tied into the clutch operating switch 94 as illustrated in FIG- URE 14, so that the solenoid 344 can be energized by depressing button 346 only when the clutch is engaged, and because the air compressor also can operate only when the motor switch is in its reverse position, this means that no fluid can be dispensed accidentally as when the machine is being moved in a forward direction to wipe the lanes in preparation for the dressing step. To say it another way, dressing can be applied only when the machine is being driven in its reverse direction and with the spray switch 346 held in its depressed position.

Conveniently, the spray switch 346, motor switch and clutch switch 94 are provided in a compartment 348 located along the bight portion of handle 52. As previously mentioned, not only for the sake of appearance but also to afford protection to the operating components, a cowling 56 is provided over the various operating elements of the machine. This cowling is mounted by bolting it at appropriate locations to a tubular member 350 which surrounds the duster, buffer and sprayer at a convenient height from the floor surface, and has its ends fastened to sidewalls 50. It is reinforced by tubular braces 352 connected at one end to the forward portion of tubing 350 and at their opposite ends to the rear wall 48 of mounting plate 34.

The operation of the machine is believed clear from the description of its component parts, as described above; however, to briefly review, the machine 20 may be moved from storage in which it has the position indicated in FIGURE 2. By pivoting it about bumpers 58 it may be quickly turned to locate its drive wheels 42 and caster wheels 44 on the surface and the machine in operating position. After unfolding handle 52 to its normally extended position and connecting cord 64 into a suitable source of electrical power, the machine is ready for operation. As taken from storage, both the duster and buffer should be in their raised positions. Therefore, after aligning the machine at the foul line of the lane to be cleaned and dressed, the operator will engage pedal 258 with his foot and urge it to the left against lip 259 to move lever 252 out of notch 274 in plate 256 where it is caught and allow it to move to an intermediate height in slot 254 where he will allow spring 276 to draw lever 252 into cut-out or notch 272. In this new position of the lever 252, frame which supports the bufiing cylinder has been rotated to a position about shaft 106 where the dusting bar 176 will be lowered so as to engage the lane surface but without the buffing cylinder 120 itself coming into contact with said surface. Of course, if desired, lever 252 could be raised to the full height of slot 254 and in which event both the bufiing cylinder 120 and the duster bar 176 would be lowered into contact with the lane surface. Motor switch 100 having been set to drive the machine in a forward direction, drive switch 94 is depressed to engage motor 62 through clutch 76 to drive wheels 42. The machine will then proceed forwardly down the lane toward the pin deck with the duster bar in operative position to wipe the surface clear of dust and the like. Upon reaching the pin deck, switch 94 will be actuated to disengage the clutch and halt further forward movement of the machine. Dusting bar 176 is then raised by the operator pressing on pedal 258 to lower lever 252 to its lowermost position where it is engaged in notch 274. In this raised position of the duster bar the dirtied portion of the wiping cloth beneath lanell piece 180 fastened to the underside of bar 176 may be replaced by a fresh section of wiping cloth so that bar 276 will be available for polishing the surface buffed by cylinder 120 on the return operation. This is conveniently accomplished by pulling upon catch lever 244 on handle 52 which action turns arm 234 of ratchet 230 to rotate take-up roll 186. The ratchet is so set that in one such angular displacement of its arm the cloth will move approximately two inches which is sufficient to replace the dirtied section of the wiping cloth with clean material and with a minimum of waste. The catch lever 244 may be then pushed down to return ratchet arm 234 to its starting position.

The operator will then release lever 252 from notch 274 by pressing on pedal 258 and moving his foot to the left against lip 259 and allowing the lever arm 252 to be raised to the full height of the slot 254. This lowers both the duster bar 276 and bufiing cylinder 120 into their yieldable lane surface engaging positions.

Motor switch 100 is then moved to its reverse position, and drive switch 94 depressed to engage clutch 76, causing the machine to start back toward the foul line. At a distance from the pin deck where it is desired to start to apply dressing, he also presses down on switch 346 so that dressing fluid will be sprayed in a fine mist onto the surface of the lane from units 30. As previously noted, hood 26 and the jets 30 are so arranged that the mist is sprayed across the entire width of the lanes which are approximately 42 inches. The nozzles 322 of the units are approximately 6 inches from the floor so that there is no wait for settling, butfing cylinder 120 immediately following with its bufiing action on the dressed surface and the duster removing excess material from the buffed surface and providing a final polish to said dressed and buffed surface. It will be noted that in this operation the operator precedes the machine so that he does not track the finished lane surface. When he reaches a selected distance from the foul line beyond which he does not wish to apply further dressing, the operator releases his hold down of switch 346. This stops further dispensing of spray. Ordinarily, however, the buffing action will be continued up to the foul line. At the foul line or at an appropriate distance therefrom, he will stop the machine by again engaging button 94. The bufling cylinder and duster bar may be then raised by depressing on pedal 258 to set lever in notch 274. The machine may be then moved, manually or by power, to the next lane where the operation will be repeated to clean and dress it. When the last lane has been completed, cord 64 may be unplugged, the machine stood on its rear-side about bumpers 58 and moved by casters 60 to the storage area.

In ordinary maintenance of the machine, it is rarely necessary to remove cowling 56, although that is easily done when necessary. Most maintenance operations can be conveniently carried out when the machine is on its rear side, as is illustrated in FIGURE 2. In this position, bottle 296 may be conveniently reached and removed from its holder 298 for refilling. Also in this position, it is a relatively simple matter to replace either the wiping cloth or to change the buffing sleeve on cylinder 126. To change the wiping cloth, the operator need only reach his hands in, push the filled take-up roll to the left against the tensioning action of springs 196 suflicient- 1y to allow disengagement of the notched end of the roll from pin 208 in cup 206. The roll may be then withdrawn. In a similar way, the now empty feed roll 184 is also removed. The filled take-11p roll is discarded and the old feed roll becomes the new take-up roll. It, as well as the new loaded feed roll, may be then inserted into the respective cups, one end of the roll being first inserted into cup 188 and by forcing it back into recess 194 engaging its slotted end 210 with pin 208 in cup 206 or 204 as the case may be. The free end of the wiping cloth is then drawn oif the feed roll, passed beneath the duster bar 176 and tacked, taped or otherwise securely fastened to the take-up roll.

Similarly, it is a relatively simple matter to change the bufiiing sleeve on cyinder 126 of the bufiing roll 120. With the machine in its end-turned position, bolt 161 at one end of the cylinder is loosened and swing lock 154 moved out of receiving notch 158 in stub shaft 118 (FIG. 9) to permit its disengagement from cylinder 120. The cylinder may be then moved to the right until its end plate 138 becomes disengaged from pins 134. The cylinder may be then dropped past hub 132 of the drive shaft 116. Bolts 152 and their washers 150 then are removed to allow the bufling cylinder 122-24 to be slid to the right off supporting cylinder 126. A new buffing sleeve may then he slid onto cylinder 126 in its place, and secured by replacing bolts 152 and washers 150. The entire bufiing unit may be then remounted by an operation in reverse to that described above.

Should it be necessary to adjust the flow of dressing fluid to the spray units, poppet valve 340 can be most conveniently reached by removing the cowling 56. The spray units 30 as well as the electrical circuit are also most conveniently reached after removing the cowling. These are adjustments, however, that require much less attention.

One of the features of the electrical circuit system is the use of a common connection board indicated by dotted lines 360 in FIGURE 14. This board comprises a plurality of bridges having binding posts at opposite ends numbered 1 through 11 which are marked for proper connection with color-coded wires from the various electrical components of the machine. For example, bridges 10 and 11 are marked so that their right hand posts are to be connected to the black leads of clutch 76 while their opposite posts are marked for connection to the leads of the DC. rectifier 98. The thus illustrated arrangement not only simplifies the manufacturing process but also it simplifies maintenance and/or repairs of the machine whenever the same are necessary.

From the aforesaid description, it will be apparent that all of the objects and advantages, as well as the features of the invention as described above, have been demonstrated as obtainable conveniently and economically in an entirely practical manner.

Therefore, having described the invention, I claim:

1. A device of the character described comprising a vehicle having supporting drive wheels, drive means including an electric motor drivingly connected to said wheels to rotate the same and selectively actuatable to propel the vehicle in forward and reverse directions, transversely extending rotatable bufiing means carried beneath said vehicle for cleaning and polishing a surface over which the vehicle travels, said bufiing means being mounted on structure pivotally secured to the vehicle to accommodate vertically yielding engagement of the buffing means with said surface, and a surface dressing applicator mounted on said vehicle behind said rotatable buffing means including jet means, a reservoir of dressing material and air compressor means connected to said jet means, the air compressor means being actuatable to spray dressing material entrained from said reservoir through the jet means onto the surface ahead of said bufiing means, and further means under the control of said drive means which inhibit entrainment of the surface dressing when the vehicle is moved in one of said two directions.

2. A device of the character described comprising a vehicle adapted to move in a forward and a reverse direction, surface wiping means adjacent the forward end thereof, surface bufiing means spaced behind said surface wiping means, said means being mounted on the vehicle for adjustment into and out of working positions with respect to the surface over which the vehicle travels, and spray means mounted on said vehicle behind said bufiing means and actuat-able to apply dressing material 15 onto the surface when the vehicle is moved in its reverse direction.

3. A device of the character described comprising a wheeled vehicle adapted to move in a forward and reverse direction, a surface dusting member beneath said vehicle and adjacent the forward end thereof, a surface bufiing member spaced behind said dusting member and beneath said vehicle, support means mounting said members to the vehicle, said support means being manipulatable to move said members into and out of working positions with respect to the surface over which the vehicle travels, and spray means mounted on said vehicle behind said buffing member and actuatable to spray predetermined quantities of dressing material onto the surface ahead of the buffing member when the wheeled vehicle is moved in its reverse direction.

4. A surface conditioning device comprising a vehicle adapted for propulsion in a forward and 'a reverse direction, a first supporting means pivotally mounted on said vehicle to swing about an axis transversely of said directions of propulsion, a butfing cylinder member rotatably supported by said first supporting means, a second supporting means pivotally mounted on the first supporting means to swing about an axis paralleling said first mentioned axis, a surface polishing member supported by said second supporting means, said supporting means having associated means for limiting the pivotal movement of the second supporting means on the first supporting means, whereby in one position of adjustment of the first supporting means about its axis neither member is in engagement with the surface over which the vehicle is propelled, in an intermediate position only the polishing member is in engagement therewith and in a third position both members are in engagement with the floor, said surface polishing member being supported to one side of the bufiing cylinder member, and surface dressing applicator means being mounted on the vehicle to the other side of said bufiing cylinder member.

5. A surface conditioning device comprising a vehicle adapted for propulsion in a forward and a reverse direction, a first supporting means pivotally mounted on said vehicle to swing about an axis transversely of said directions of propulsion, said first supporting means having end portions and a bufiing cylinder member rotatably supported between said end portions of the first supporting means, a second supporting means pivotally mounted on said end portions of the first supporting means to freely swing about an axis paralleling said first mentioned axis, a surface polishing member supported by said second supporting means, said supporting means having associated means for limiting the angle through which the first supporting means may swing downwardly about its pivotal mounting on the end portions of the first supporting means, lever means for swinging said first supporting means about its axis to selectively locate said members in and out of surface engagement, and means for releasably locking said lever member in an adjusted position, said surface polishing member being supported to one side of the buffing cylinder member, and surface dressing applicator means being mounted on the vehicle to the other side of said bufiing cylinder member.

6. The surface conditioning device of claim wherein the surface dressing applicator comprises a plurality of downwardly-directed jets, conduit means connecting said jets with a supply of dressing fluid, other conduit means connecting said jets to an air compressor which forces air outwardly and downwardly of the jets entraining dressing fluid therewith from the first mentioned conduit means and means for cutting off the flow of dressing fluid through said first mentioned conduit means into the jets,

7. In a device for conditioning the surface of bowling lanes, a U-frame having a pair of legs, a bufiing cylinder rotatably mounted between said legs of the U-frarne, said U-frame and cylinder supported thereby extending transversely of the direction of propulsion of the device and of a length to extend the full width of a bowling lane, means pivotally connecting said frame to the device whereby the buffing cylinder may be raised to a position out of engagement with a lane surface over which the device is propelled, a pair of supporting arms extending forwardly of the U-frame each having one end pivotally connected to the legs of said U-frame for swinging movement about an axis paralleling the axis about which the U-frame is pivotally connected, and a polishing member supported between the two arms, said U-frame :and arms pivotally connected thereto having associated means which limit the downward swing of the arms about their said pivotal connection, wherey the U-shaped frame may be pivoted about its connection to raise both the polishing member and the buffing cylinder off the lane surface and may be pivoted downwardly to an intermediate position about its connection to a position where only the polishing member is in engagement with the lane surface and to a lower position where both the polishing member and the buffing cylinder are in engagement with the lane surface, and means for holding the U-shaped frame in each of said three positions of pivotal adjustment about its connection on the device.

8. In a device for conditioning the surface of bowling lanes, a U-frame having a pair of legs, a buffing cylinder rotatably mounted between said legs of the U-frame, said U-frame and cylinder supported thereby extending transversely of the direction of propulsion of the device and of a length to extend the full width of a bowling lane, means pivotally connecting said frame to the device for movement about an axis above and to the rear of said cylinder whereby the buffing cylinder may be raised to a position out of engagement with a lane surface over which the device is propelled, a pair of supporting arms having one end pivotally connected to the legs of said U-frame for swinging movement about an axis paralleling the axis about which the U-frame is pivotally connected, a resilient member supported between the other two ends of said two arms, means on said two arms for rotatably supporting a pair of rollers, one comprising a roll of wiping material and the other a take-up rod therefor, the wiping material extending from said first roller about the resilient member and connected to said take-up roll, and manipulatable means for turning said take-up roll so as to unroll wiping material from the one roller onto the take-up roll so as to present clean wiping material about the resilient member as is required, said U-frame and arms pivotally connected thereto further having associated means which limit the downward swing of the arms about their said pivotal connection, whereby the U-shaped frame may be pivoted about its connection to raise both the polishing member and the buffing cylinder off the lane surface and may be pivoted downwardly to an intermediate position about its connection to a position where only the polishing member is in engagement with the lane surface and to a lower position where both the polishing member and the buffing cylinder are in engagement with said lane surface, and means for holding the U-shaped frame in each of said three positions of pivotal adjustment about its connection on the device.

9. In a device for conditioning the surface of bowling lanes, a U-frame having a pair of legs, a buffing cylinder rotatably mounted between said legs of the U-frame, said U-frame and cylinder supported thereby extending transversely of the direction of propulsion of the device and the bufling cylinder having a length to extend the full Width of a bowlinglane, means pivotally connecting said frame to the device for adjustment about an axis disposed above, rearwardly and transversely of the device, a pair of supporting arms each having one end pivotally connected to the legs of said U-frame for swinging movement about an axis disposed above the buffing cylinder and paralleling the axis about which the U-frame is pivotally connected, and a wiping member supported between the other ends of said two arms, said U-frame and arms pivotally connected thereto having associated means which limit the downward swing of the arms about their said pivotal connection whereby the U-shaped frame may be pivoted about its connection to a height where both the Wiping member and the bufi'ing cylinder are raised off the lane surface, said arms further being of a length and shape such that in lowering the U-frame about its pivotal connection an intermediate position will be reached where only the wiping member is in engagement with the bowling lane surface and thereafter a lower position where both the wiping member and the bufling cylinder will engage the bowling lane surface, and means for holding the U-shaped frame in each of said three positions of pivotal adjustment about its connection on the device.

10. A bowling lane surface conditioning machine comprising a vehicle, drive means therefor including an'electric motor and circuit by which it is adapted for forward and reverse propulsion of the vehicle, lane surface bufiing means supported by the vehicle so as to have free floating engagement with and across the width of the lane surface when the vehicle is propelled lengthwise of the lane and adapted to rotate with propulsion of the vehicle, an applicator positioned ahead of the bufling means for spraying dressing material onto the lane surface across the width of the lane immediately ahead of the bufling means in one direction of propulsion of the vehicle, said applicator comprising a plurality of downwardly directed jets, a reservoir of dressing material connected thereto, and air compressor means operable to direct air through said jets for spraying dressing material from said reservoir through said jets in a fog across the width of the lane, said circuit including means inhibiting the flow of the dressing material to said jets in the opposite direction of propulsion of said vehicle, and means for controlling the amount of dressing material sprayed by the air compressor means through the jets in said one direction of propulsion of the vehicle.

11. A bowling lane surface conditioning machine comprising a vehicle supported on wheels, an electric motor drivingly connected to said wheels of said vehicle to rotate the same, and actuatable means for reversing the direction of rotation of the motor to permit driving the vehicle from the foul line of a bowling lane toward the pin deck and then to return the vehicle without its turning around, vertically yieldable lane surface wiping means and lane surface bufiifig means each pivotally supported on the vehicle one behind the other so as to vertically yieldably engage across the width of the lane surface when the vehicle is propelled lengthwise of the lane, the bufiing means being drivingly connected with said motor to rotate with propulsion of the vehicle, and an applicator for applying dressing material directly to the lane surface across the width thereof immediately ahead of the bufling means in one direction of propulsion of the vehicle comprising a plurality of downwardly-directed jets supported at a fixed distance from a bowling lane surface over which the vehicle is propelled, air compressor means connected with said jets for directing air through said jets downwardly onto the lane surface, a reservoir of dressing fluid connected to said jets to permit entrainment of fluid by air directed downwardly from said jets for dispersing thereby in a spray across the width of the bowling lane, and means for regulating the amount of dressing fluid which may be entrained.

12. A bowling lane surface conditioning machine comprising a vehicle adapted for forward and reverse propulsion, lane surface bufling means supported thereby to engage across the width of the lane surface when the vehicle is propelled lengthwise of the lane and to rotate with propulsion of the vehicle, an applicator for applying dressing material across the width of the lane comprising a plurality of downwardly-directed jets supported at a fixed distance from a bowling lane surface over which the vehicle is propelled, air compressor means connected with said jets for directing air through said jets downwardly onto the lane surface, a reservoir of dressing fluid, means including a valve connecting the reservoir to said jets to permit entrainment of fluid by air directed downwardly from said jets and means for opening said valve when the vehicle is propelled in one direction and for holding the valve closed when the vehicle is operated in the opposite direction.

13. A bowling lane surface conditioning machine comprising a vehicle adapted for forward and reverse propulsion, lane surface bufling means in the form of an axially rotatable cylinder supported thereby to engage across the width of the lane surface when the vehicle is propelled lengthwise of the lane and to rotate -with propulsion of the vehicle, a plurality of jets for spray-applying dressing material across the width of the lane immediately ahead of the bulfing means, a hood about said jets for confining the spray from said jets, means for controlling the amount of dressing material applied by said jets, and means for inhibiting the application of dressing material through said jets in one direction of propulsion of the vehicle.

14. A device for conditioning the surface of bowling lanes comprising a power-driven wheeled vehicle adapted for propulsion in both forward and reverse directions, a frame having angled end portions, a bufling cylinder rotatably mounted between the end portions of said frame, said frame and cylinder supported thereby extending transversely of the directions of propulsion of the vehicle and of a length to extend the full width of a bowling lane, means pivotally connecting said frame to the vehicle for movement about a transverse axis, lever means associated with said frame whereby the bufling cylinder may be raised to a position out of engagement with a lane surface over which the device is propelled, a pair of supporting arms pivotally connected to said end portions of theframe for swinging movement about an axis paralleling the axis about which the frame is pivotally connected, a bar connecting the ends of the two arms remote from their said pivotal connection, said bar being yieldable at least on its underside, a pair of rollers rotatably mounted between said two arms intermediate the ends thereof, one of said rollers constituting a feed roll for a length of wiping material and the other comprising a take-up roll on which to wind said length of wiping material from the feed roll, the wiping material extending from the feed roll under the yieldable side of the bar to .the take-up roll, and means operable to turn the take-up roll so as to present fresh wiping material on the underside of the bar, said frame and pivotally connected arms having means for limiting the downward swing of the arms about their pivotal connection on the end portions of the frame whereby said frame may be pivoted about its connection to raise both the bar and the buffing cylinder off the lane surface, said arms further being so shaped that said frame may be pivoted downwardly about its connection to first locate only the bar in engagement with the lane surface beneath and to a still lower position to locate both the bar and the butfing cylinder in lane-surface engagement, and means for holding the frame in each of said three positions of pivotal adjustment, a hood carried by said vehicle behind the butling cylinder in parallel relation to said cylinder and across the width of a bowling lane, downwardly-directed spray jets within said hood, a reservoir for dressing fluid, conduit means including a valve connecting said reservoir to said jets, air compressor means directing air through said jets, said air entraining dressing material so to spray a fog of said dressing fluid across the width of the bowling lane within the dimensions of the hood, the valve means being operable only when the device is propelled in its reverse direction, manipulatable means actuatable by the operator for winding one roller to cause unrolling of a portion of the wiping material from one roller onto the other so as to present a clean portion of the wiping material beneath the bar as required, and drive means connected to the buffing cylinder for rotating the same when the vehicle is propelled, said device being'pivotable about its rear edge, and the rear side of the device having rollers thereon which permit movement of the device in said position from one location to another.

15. A device for conditioning the surface of bowling lanes comprising an electric motor-driven wheeled vehicle, means adapting said vehicle for propulsion in forward and reverse directions, a buffing cylinder rotatably supported beneath said vehicle and extending transversely of the vehicle, said cylinder being of a length to extend the full width of a bowling lane, a pair of supporting arms mounted on said vehicle for swinging movement about an axis paralleling the axis about which the buffing cylinder rotates, a bar connecting the ends of the two arms remote from their said pivotal connection and forwardly of th buffing cylinder to yieldably engage the lane surface across the width thereof, a pair of rollers rotatably mounted between the two arms and in spaced parallel relation to said connecting bar, one of said rollers constituting a feed roll for a length of wiping material and the other comprising a take-up roll on which to wind said length of wiping material from the feed roll, the wiping material extending from the feed roll under the connecting bar to the take-up roll, and means operable to turn the take-up roll so as to present fresh wiping material on the under side of the bar which engages the surface of a bowling lane over which the vehicle is propelled, and means for releasably holding the buffer means in spaced relation above the lane surface and with the said bar and wiping material in free flfloating engagement with the lane surface to elfect a polishing action thereon, said vehicle further having a plurality of transversely spaced downwardly-directed spray jets located to one side of and in spaced parallel relation to the buffing cylinder, a reservoir for dressing fluid including valve means connecting said reservoir to said jets which when opened allow dressing fluid to fiow through the jets, air compressor means actuatable to direct air through the jets so as to disperse the dressing material and spray a fog thereof across the width of the bowling lane, and drive means connecting the buffing cylinder with the motor which propels the vehicle for rotating the buffer during propulsion of the vehicle.

16. A device for conditioning the surface of bowling lanes comprising an electric motor-driven vehicle, a control circuit connected to said motor and including means selectively actuatable to permit propelling the vehicle in forward and reverse directions, a buffing cylinder rotatably supported beneath said vehicle for vertically yieldable engagement with a bowling lane surface over which the vehicle is propelled, and extending transversely of the vehicle and being of a length to extend the full width of a bowling lane, a pair of supporting arms mounted on said vehicle for swinging movement about an axis paralleling the axis about which the buffing cylinder rtates, a bar connecting the ends of the two arms remote from their said pivotal connection and forwardly of the buffing cylinder to yieldably engage the lane surface across the width thereof, a pair of rollers rotatably mounted between the two arms and in spaced parallel relation to said connecting bar, one of said rollers constituting a feed roll for a length of wiping material and the other comprising a take-up roll on which to wind said length of wiping material from the feed roll, the wiping material extending from the feed roll under the connecting bar to the take-up roll, and means operable to turn the take-up roll so as to present fresh wiping material on the under side of the bar which engages the surface of the bowling lane, said vehicle further having a plurality of transversely spaced downwardly-directed spray jets located to one side of and in spaced parallel relation to the buffing cylinder, a reservoir fpr dressing fluid including valve means connecting said reservoir to said jets, which when opened allow dressing fluid to flow through the jets, air compressor means directing air through the jets so as to disperse the dressing material and spray a fog thereof across the width of the bowling lane, the valve means being solenoid-operated and so arranged in the motor circuit as to be operable only when the device is propelled in one of said two mentioned directions and to be inoperable when propeled in the other direction, and drive means connecting the buffing cylinder with said motor which drives the vehicle for rotating the buffer during propulsion of the vehicle.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,987,741 6/1961 Feldman et al 154 3,017,648 1/1962 Wilson et a1. 15-50 3,042,950 7/1962 Ludwig et al 15-50 3,058,136 10/1962 Rachlin 1550 3,083,390 4/1963 Wroten 15103.5 3,217,347 11/1965 Domecki 1551 899,725 9/1908 Goodier 15-51 X 899,726 9/1908 Goodier 15-99 X 1,827,402 10/1931 Reddig 15372 X 1,995,685 3/1935 Perkins 1598 2,783,092 2/1957 Gavin et al 239--291 2,795,002 6/1957 Davies 15230 2,822,562 2/1958 Shackelford 15230 2,877,476 3/1959 Kraszewski 1598 2,930,055 3/1960 Fallen et a1 154 2,946,521 7/ 1960 McEachern 239-547 2,978,721 4/1961 Simmons 1598 FOREIGN PATENTS 22,680 9/ 1910 Great Britain. 414,207 5/ 1925 Germany.

MORRIS O. WOLK, Primary Examiner.

I. ZATARGA, Assistant Examiner.

U.S. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US899725 *Feb 28, 1900Sep 29, 1908Hygienic Floor Machine CompanyFloor-cleaning machine.
US899726 *Sep 10, 1906Sep 29, 1908Hygienic Floor Machine CompanyFloor duster and polisher.
US1827402 *Mar 30, 1927Oct 13, 1931Graybar Electric CompanyFloor treating machine
US1995685 *Jun 8, 1933Mar 26, 1935Cecil K PerkinsApparatus for cleaning walls
US2783092 *May 17, 1956Feb 26, 1957Gavin Linus AAir gun
US2795002 *Sep 6, 1952Jun 11, 1957Davies Joseph RSolder wiper roll
US2822562 *Oct 13, 1955Feb 11, 1958Shackelford Renee M FPolishing attachment for electric mixers
US2877476 *Mar 5, 1958Mar 17, 1959Samuel KraszewskiWax applicator
US2930055 *Dec 16, 1957Mar 29, 1960Fallen Burke RFloor wax dispensing and spreading unit
US2946521 *Jan 23, 1959Jul 26, 1960American Mono Rail CoAdjustable boot nozzle
US2978721 *Oct 14, 1959Apr 11, 1961Simmons James FBowling alley sander and waxer
US2987741 *Nov 13, 1956Jun 13, 1961Feldman Harry WMachine for removing painted markings from pavement
US3017648 *Aug 24, 1959Jan 23, 1962Deardorff George ASpreader for wax or the like
US3042950 *Sep 30, 1960Jul 10, 1962Johnson Raymond RBowling alley conditioning machine
US3058136 *Jun 24, 1960Oct 16, 1962Eastern Res CorpPolishing machine with aerosol dispenser
US3083390 *Dec 23, 1959Apr 2, 1963Krogh Ind IncBowling lane maintenance apparatus
US3217347 *Mar 19, 1962Nov 16, 1965American Mach & FoundryMachine for cleaning and polishing bowling lanes
DE414207C *May 26, 1925Theodor BuschMaschine zur Bearbeitung von Parkettfussboeden
GB191022680A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3816868 *Dec 21, 1971Jun 18, 1974Singer CoGlass cleaning apparatus
US3868738 *Aug 27, 1973Mar 4, 1975Western Sales & Supply CoSelf-propelled automatic bowling lane maintenance machine
US4246674 *Sep 10, 1979Jan 27, 1981Century International Corp.Automatic bowling lane stripper
US4463469 *Jun 23, 1982Aug 7, 1984Lois G. HickeyAutomatic bowling lane maintenance machine
US4519338 *Oct 20, 1983May 28, 1985Sanifoam, Inc.Apparatus and method for applying a foam layer to cover and seal dumped waste
US4727615 *Jun 13, 1986Mar 1, 1988Eishin Technology Company, LimitedBowling lane maintenance apparatus
US4770088 *Feb 27, 1987Sep 13, 1988Specified Equipment Systems Co., Inc.Moveable spray enclosure
US4932354 *Sep 12, 1988Jun 12, 1990Specified Equipment Systems Co., Inc.Moveable spray enclosure
US4959884 *Apr 16, 1990Oct 2, 1990Century International CorporationCombination bowling lane stripper and dressing apparatus
US5181290 *Jun 5, 1992Jan 26, 1993Kegel Company, Inc.Bowling lane maintenance machine
US5185901 *Jun 11, 1991Feb 16, 1993The Kegel Company, Inc.Bowling lane maintenance machine capable of self-indexing from lane-to-lane
US5517709 *Nov 10, 1994May 21, 1996Amf Bowling, Inc.Apparatus for selectively metering dressing onto a bowling lane surface
US5729855 *Jun 11, 1996Mar 24, 1998The Kegel Company, Inc.Bowling lane conditioning machine with single head dispenser
US6615434 *Oct 5, 1993Sep 9, 2003The Kegel Company, Inc.Bowling lane cleaning machine and method
US7014714Sep 2, 2004Mar 21, 2006Brunswick Bowling & Billiards CorporationApparatus and method for conditioning a bowling lane using precision delivery injectors
US7611583Jan 9, 2006Nov 3, 2009Brunswick Bowling & Billiards CorporationApparatus and method for conditioning a bowling lane using precision delivery injectors
US7784147Mar 23, 2006Aug 31, 2010Brunswick Bowling & Billiards CorporationBowling lane conditioning machine
US8051528 *Jun 14, 2006Nov 8, 2011Kegel, LlcMethod of maintaining a bowling lane
US8122563Aug 26, 2010Feb 28, 2012Brunswick Bowling & Billiards CorporationBowling lane conditioning machine
DE3032692A1 *Aug 29, 1980Mar 26, 1981Century Int CoAbstreif- bzw. reinigungsvorrichtung fuer eine bowlingbahn
DE4117957A1 *May 31, 1991Dec 3, 1992Bernd KrallmannWet-dry vacuum cleaner for floors - has wiper in form of wiper strips running over two pairs of rollers, with wetting nozzle
EP1824608A2 *Mar 3, 2005Aug 29, 2007Brunswick Bowling & Billiards CorporationBowling lane conditioning machine
WO2006065258A2 *Mar 3, 2005Jun 22, 2006Brunswick BowlingBowling lane conditioning machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/98, 134/6, 15/50.1, 15/4, 118/305
International ClassificationA47L11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/4044, A47L11/4069, A47L11/00, A47L11/4088, A47L11/4055, A47L11/4041, A63D5/10
European ClassificationA47L11/40F6, A63D5/10, A47L11/40G2, A47L11/40F4, A47L11/40N6, A47L11/40J4, A47L11/00