Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3419081 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 31, 1968
Filing dateMar 15, 1967
Priority dateMar 15, 1967
Publication numberUS 3419081 A, US 3419081A, US-A-3419081, US3419081 A, US3419081A
InventorsNelson Wayne F
Original AssigneeKoehring Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Well cementing device
US 3419081 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 31, 1968 w. F. NELSON WELL CEMENTING DEVICE Sheet L of2 Filed March 15. 1967 Way/7e F A/Q/JOl? INVENTOR. By in, WKJ

l4 7' P/VEVJ Dec. 31, 1968 w. F. NELSON 3,419,081

WELL CEMENTING DEVI CE Filed March 15. 1967 Shet 2 of 2 Q INVENTOR. yMWW BY My QAWJA/ ATTORNEY) United States Patent 3,419,081 WELL CEMENTING DEVICE Wayne F. Nelson, Waxahachie, Tex., assignor to Koehring Company, Waxahachie, Tex., a corporation of Wisconsin Filed Mar. 15, 1967, Ser. No. 623,467 Claims. (Cl. 166-225) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A cementing device adapted to be connected to a well pipe for use in a well bore having a releasably held pressure responsive sleeve valve which when released, allows circulation to flow out through the cement ports and the lower portion of the device and prevents flow inwardly through the cement ports.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to an improved device for controlling flow in well pipes during cementing operations in a well bore.

In the cementing of Well bores, cementing shoes or collars are generally secured to the well pipe string to control the flow of cement. It is advantageous for such devices to provide an orifice communicating from the exterior to the interior of the device allowing well fluids to enter the pipe at a controlled rate as the string is lowered in the well bore. A valve may be provided to close the fill orifice when subject to excessive fill rates, indicative of a possible blowout. Closure of the orifice prevents flow into the pipe string and flow in the annulus, under such conditions, is readily controlled in the usual manner. Such devices also should have cementing ports a which are controlled by a valve to prevent flow into the string after the cement is in place. Therefore, the valve controlling the orifice which originally allows fiow into the string must be activated or released to prevent flow into the string in preparation for cementing. Usually, since such valves are pressure responsive, they are activated by dropping a closure means to seat in the device and allow the pressure in the string to be increased to release the valve. This valve has been used to control side cementing ports in prior devices and are positioned to block the cementing ports until released and also to close both the orifice and the cementing ports to prevent flow into the device after the cement is in place. The T. E. Alexander et a1. Patent No. 3,273,650, Sept. 20, 1966 is an example of this type of device. This type device has proven to be an excellent arrangement. However, circulation downward through the device is prevented when the closure means is seated. This prevents cuttings positioned in the bottom of the well bore from being circulated out once the closure means is in place.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an improved well cementing device having automatic fill-up which are the cementing valve is released to prevent back flow into the device, allows downward circulation through the lower end of the device.

Another object is to provide an improved cementing device having a valve releasably closing the cementing ports which when released allows cement to flow through the lower end of the device.

Still another object is to provide an improved cementing device having an annular valve element adapted to close the fill-up orifice when excess flow occurs which valve is released for cementing responsive to pressure above the valve held by a closure means and such valve opens cementing ports to direct cement downwardly around the closure means and out the lower end of the device.

Patented Dec. 31, 1968 A further object is to provide an improved automatic fi1l-up and cementing device wherein circulation may be established downward through the device at any time.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING These and other objects and advantages of the present invention are hereinafter described with reference to the preferred forms of the invention illustrated in the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of the improved cementing shoe device of the present invention connected to a well pipe string and shown in the running position.

FIGURE 2 is a longitudinal sectional View of the device shown in FIGURE 1 and illustrates the cementing position.

FIGURE 3 is a similar view of such device illustrating the prevention of back flow into and through the well pipe.

FIGURE 4 is a longitudinal sectional view of the improved cementing collar device of the present invention connected in a well pipe string and showing the running position.

FIGURE 5 is a similar view of the device shown in FIGURE 4 and illustrates the cementing position of the device.

FIGURE 6 is another sectional view of the device shown in FIGURE 4 and illustrates the prevention of back flow into and through the well pipe.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The cementing shoe illustrated in FIGURES 1, 2 and 3 includes the tubular body 10 having a central bore 12 extending entirely therethrough. The upper end of the body 10 is provided with means, such as the threads 14, for connecting the body 10 to a well pipe string P on which it is lowered into a well bore. The tubular body 10 defines the fill orifice 16 near its upper end which orifice establishes communication between the exterior and the interior of tubular body 10.

The sleeve 18 is secured in position in the lower end of body 10 by the concrete filler 20 which is suitably shaped to provide the lower exterior desired for the cementing shoe. The sleeve 18 supports the inwardly projecting ribs 22 which define the seat 24 by their inner, upper surfaces. The ring 26 is secured within the body 10 against the upper end of sleeve 18 by the ring 28 which engages in a groove in the interior of body 10.

The tubular member 30 having a central bore 32 extending therethrough is supported within the body 10 by the ring 26 and has its exterior spaced from the interior of the body 10 to define the annular space 34. The upper end of tubular member 30 defines the upper seat 36. The seat 38 defined by the ring 26 surrounds the lower end of the bore 32 and is adapted to receive the closure means, ball 40, to prevent flow upwardly through tubular member 30 and body 10. The ball 40 is positioned within body 10 between the seat 38 and the seat 24. When seated on seat 24, fluids are free to flow downwardly around the ball 40 between the ribs 22 and out through the lower end of body 10. The tubular member 30 defines the cementing ports 42 which provide communication between the annular space 34 and the interior of tubular member 30.

The annular sleeve valve 44 is releasably secured in the annular space 34 by the shear pin 46 in a position below the fill orifice 16 and closing the cementing ports 42. The sleeve valve 44 is adapted, when released, to be slidable in the annular space 34 responsive to pressure differentials across the sleeve valve 44. The tubular body 10 defines the ports 48 to establish communication between the annular space 34 and the exterior of the body 10. The upper end of the sleeve valve 44 is exposed to fluid pressures in the body 18 above the seat 36, whereby the pressure differentials between pressures upstream and downstream of the tubular member 30 act upon the sleeve valve 44. When such pressure difi erentials are sufficient to release sleeve valve 44 by shearing pin 46, the sleeve valve 44 thereafter slides in the annular space 34 to an upper position closing cementing ports 42 and orifice 16 or to a lower position in which cement ports 42 and orifice 16 are open. If desired, a resilient means, such as a spring (not shown) may be used to bias said sleeve valve toward its upper position. The interior of body defines the downwardly facing shoulder 50 above the orifice 16 which shoulder provides a limit to the upward movement of the sleeve valve 44.

In operation, the cementing device shown in FIGURES l, 2 and 3 is lowered into a well bore connected to the lower end of the well pipe string P. As it is being lowered, as shown in FIGURE 1, the ball 40 is held in engagement with the seat 38 to prevent well fluids from entering the pipe string P from below the cementing device. All of the well fluids entering the pipe string P flow through the fill orifice 16 which is sized to provide the desired flow rate into the body 10. In the event of a blowout or other reason creating excessive pressure on the exterior of tubular body 10, the flow rate through orifice 16 will increase responsive to such pressure. The additional velocity of fluids flowing through the orifice creates-a decrease of pressure on the upper edge of sleeve valve 44 and the pressure around body It) is conducted through port 48 to be exerted on the lower edge of sleeve valve 44-. Such pressure differential shears the pin 46 and forces the sleeve valve 44 to its upper position, closing flow through orifice 16.

During the lowering, circulation may be established downwardly through the body 10 since the ball 40 does not prevent flow downwardly. Such circulation may be useful even though sleeve valve 44 has been released by excess velocities through orifice 16 to remedy blowout conditions.

Under usual conditions, the sleeve valve 44 remains in its secured position until the string has been lowered and the well is ready for cementing. To start cementing, the ball 52 is first dropped through the pipe string P. Ball 52 is adapted to land and seal on seat 36 to allow a build-up of pressure in the well pipe string above seat 36. The increased pressure is exerted on the upper edge of sleeve valve 44 to shear pin 46 and thereby release or activate sleeve valve 44. When released, sleeve valve 44 moves to its lower position shown in FIGURE 2 to allow cement from the well pipe string to flow around ball 52, through cementing ports 42, downwardly through tubular member and out through the lower end of body 10. This assures that the cement is positioned around the lower exterior of body 10, displacing well fluids upwardly in the annulus as the cement rises therein.

When the cementing has been completed, the tendency of the cement to flow upwardly through the lower end of body 10 is prevented by ball which engages seat 38. Also, the cement pressure is conducted through ports 48 to move sleeve valve 44 upwardly to prevent flow into tubular body 10 through fill orifice 16 as shown in FIG- URE 3.

The cementing collar illustrated in FIGURES 4, 5, and 6 includes the tubular body 54 having a central bore 56 extending entirely therethrough. Tubular body 54 is composed of outer body member 58 and inner body member 60 which is positioned and held within outer body member 58 by the concrete filler 62. The upper end of outer body member is provided with means, such as threads 64, for connecting the body 54 to a well pipe string P-1 and threads 66 for connecting the tubular body 54 to lower extension P2 of the well pipe string. The tubular body 54 defines the fill orifice 68 which extends through the outer body member 58, the concrete filler 62 and the inner body member 60. The orifice 68 provides communication between the exterior and the interior of tubular body member 54.

The ring 70 is positioned abutting the lower end of the inner body member 60 and is held in position by the concrete filler 62. The tubular member 72, which has a central bore 74- extending therethrough, is supported within the tubular body 54 by the ring 70 and has its upper exterior spaced from the interior of the inner body member 60 to define the annular space 76. The upper end of tubular member 72 defines the upper seat 78. The seat 80, defined by the ring 70, surrounds the lower end of the bore 74 and is adapted to receive the closure means or back check valve 82 which is supported by the ring 70 and resiliently urged into engagement with the seat 89 by the spring 84 to prevent flow upwardly through tubular member 72 and the tubular body 54. Thus, the back check valve 82 allows flow of fluids downwardly through tubular body 54 and the tubular member 72 but prevents back flow of fluids therethrough. The tubular member 72 defines the cementing ports 86 which provide communication between the annular space 76 and the interior of the tubular member 72.

The annular sleeve valve 88 is releasably secured in the annular space 76 by the shear pin 90 in a position below the fill orifice 68 and closing the cementing ports 86. The sleeve valve 88 is adapted, when released, to be slidable in the annular space 76 responsive to pressure differentials across the sleeve valve 88. The ring 70 defines the port 92 to establish communication between the annular space 76 and the interior of the tubular body 54 downstream of the seat 80. The upper end of sleeve valve 88 is exposed to fluid pressures in the body 10 above the seat 78 whereby the pressure differentials between the pressure upstream and downstream of the tubular member 72 act upon the sleeve valve 88. When such pressure dilferentials are suificient to release the sleeve valve 88 by shearing the pin 90, the sleeve valve 88 thereafter slides in the annular space 76 to an upper position closing cementing ports 86 and flow orifice 68 or to a lower position in which cementing ports 86 and flow orifice 68 are opened. If desired, a resilient means, such as a spring (not shown) may be used to bias the sleeve towards its extreme upper position. The interior of inner body 60 defines the downwardly facing shoulder 94 above the orifice 68 which shoulder provides a limit to the upward movement of the sleeve valve 88.

In operation, the cementing device shown in FIGURES 4, 5 and 6 is lowered into a well bore connected in the well pipe string P-l. As it is being lowered, as shown in FIGURE 1, the check valve 82 is held in engagement with the seat to prevent well fluids from entering the pipe string from below the cementing device. All of the well fluids entering the pipe string P1 flow through the fill orifice 68, which is sized to provide the desired flow rate into the body 54. In the event of blowout or other reason creating excessive pressure on the exterior of tubular body 54, the flow rate through orifice 68 will increase responsive to such pressure. The additional velocity of fluids flowing through the orifice creates a decreased pressure on the upper edge of sleeve valve 88 and the pressure below the seat 80 is conducted through the port 92 to be exerted on the lower edge of sleeve valve. Such pressure differential shears the pin and forces the sleeve valve 88 to its upper position closing flow through orifice 68.

During lowering, circulation may be established through the body 54 since the check valve 82 does not prevent flow downwardly. Such circulation may be useful even though sleeve valve 88 has been released by excess velocities through orifice 68 to remedy blowout conditions.

Under usual conditions, the sleeve valve 88 remains in its secured position until the well pipe string has been lowered and the well is ready for cementing. To start cementing, the ball 96 is first dropped into the pipe string P-1. Ball 96 is adapted to land and seal on the seat 78 to allow a build-up of pressure in the well pipe string above seat 78. The increased pressure is exerted on the upper edge of sleeve valve 88 to shear the pin 90 and thereby release or activate sleeve valve 88. When released, sleeve valve 88 moves to its lower position as shown in FIGURE 5 to allow cement from the well pipe string to flow around the ball 96 through the cementing ports 86 and downwardly through the tubular member 72 and out through the lower end of the body 54 into the lower extension P2 of the well pipe string.

When the cementing has been completed, the tendency of the cement to flow upwardly through the lower end of the body 54 is prevented by the check valve 82 which engages the seat 80. Also, the cement pressure within the lower portion of the body 54 is conducted through the port 92 to move the sleeve valve 88 upwardly and thereby prevent flow into tubular body 54 through the fill orifice 68. This position is shown in FIGURE 6.

From the foregoing it can be seen that the cementing device of the present invention may be connected to a well pipe string, provides an automatic fill-up controlled by a releasably held annular valve, which annular valve is releasable to close the fill orifice upon excess flow through the fill orifice and also is releasable by the buildup of additional pressure above the valve to open the cementing ports and allow cement to be conducted downwardly through the device for discharge into the well bore therebelow; such annular sleeve valve further is responsive to pressure differentials closing above the cementing ports and the fill orifice when cementing has been completed. Additionally, it can be seen that the device may be used either as a cementing shoe or as a cementing collar and that circulation may be established downwardly through the device at any time.

The foregoing disclosure and description of the invention are illustrative and explanatory thereof, and various changes in the size, shape and materials, as well as in the details of the illustrated construction, may be made within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A well cementing device, comprising:

a tubular body having a central bore and means for connecting said body to a well pipe string,

said tubular body defining at least one orifice communicating between the interior and exterior of said tubular body,

a tube having a central bore and mounted in said tubular body with a portion of the exterior of said tube being spaced inwardl from the interior walls of said tubular member to define an annular space and with the bore of said tube providing communication between the bore of said tubular body above and below said tube,

said tube defining an upper seat and at least one cementing port communicating from said annular space to the interior of said tube,

an annular valve positioned in said annular space,

means releasably securing said annular valve in said annular space in position closing flow through said cementing port, and

means communicating downstream pressure to the loW- er end of said annular valve in said annular space,

the upper end of said annular valve being exposed to pressure within said tubular body above said tube,

said securing means being released by a predetermined pressure difierential exerted on said valve,

said valve, when released, sliding in said annular space responsive to pressure exerted on said annular valve,

said valve in its upper position closing both said orifice and said port and in its lower position, opening both said orifice and said port.

2. A well cementing device according to claim 1 including:

a lower seat surrounding the lower bore of said tube,

and

pressure responsive means adapted to engage said lower seat to prevent flow upwardly through said tubular body.

3. A well cementing device according to claim 2, wherein said pressure responsive means includes:

a back check valve pivotally mounted below said lower seat and adapted to engage said lower seat to prevent flow upwardly therethrough.

4. A well cementing device according to claim 2, wherein said pressure responsive means includes:

a ball positioned in said tubular body below said lower seat and adapted to engage said lower seat, and

a ribbed seat mounted in the lower end of said tubular body and adapted to receive and support said ball in a position allowing flow downwardly through said tubular body.

5. A well cementing device according to claim 1,

wherein:

said tubular body defines a port to provide said downstream pressure communication means extending from the exterior of said body to said annular space.

6. A well cementing device according to claim 1, including:

means supporting said tube in said tubular body,

said tube supporting means defining a port to provide said downstream pressure communicating means extending from the interior of said tubular body below said supporting means to said annular space.

7. A well cementing device according to claim 1, wherein said tubular body includes said connecting means at its upper end for connecting to a well pipe string as a cementing shoe.

8. A well cementing device according to claim 1, Wherein said tubular body includes said connecting means at its upper and lower ends for connecting said body into a Well pipe string as a cementing collar.

9. A well cementing device, comprising:

a tubular body having a central bore and means connecting said body to a well pipe string,

said tubular body defining at least one orifice communicating between the interior and exterior of said tubular body,

a tube mounted in said tubular body with a portion of the exterior of said tube being spaced inwardly from the interior walls of said tubular member to define an annular space,

said tube defining at least one cementing port for communicating from said annular space to the interior of said tubular body below said tube,

an annular valve positioned in said annular space,

means releasably holding said annular valve from moving to a position closing said orifice,

means communicating downstream pressure to the lower end of said annular valve,

the upper end of said annular valve being exposed to pressure within said tubular body above said tube,

said holding means being released by a predetermined pressure differential exerted on said valve,

said annular valve being adapted to slide in said annular space responsive to pressure exerted on said annular valve,

said annular valve in its upper position closing both said cementing port and said orifice to prevent back flow into said tubular body.

10. A fill-up and cementing device including:

a tubular body having means for connecting said body in a well pipe string,

said body having an orifice located nearer its upper end establishing communication between the exterior and interior thereof whereby fluid from the annulus surrounding the body and the well pipe string may flow through the orifice and into the string,

a tubular member positioned within said tubular body,

said tubular member being secured at its lower end to the interior of said tubular body and extending upwardly through a substantial portion of said tubular body forming an annular space between said tubular body and said tubular member,

said tubular member having cementing ports located below said orifice, means for establishing communication between said annular space and a position downstream of said tubular member,

a sleeve valve element slidably mounted within said annular space and movable to an upper position closing flow through the orifice and said cementing ports and also movable to a lower position to uncover said orifice and said cementing ports,

releasable means for normally retaining said sleeve valve element in a position in which said orifice is open and the cementing ports are covered and closed,

a seat on said tubular member,

means cooperating with said seat to apply a pressure above said sleeve valve element,

said releasable means being releasable by a predetermined force applied to said sleeve valve element, the upper surface of said sleeve valve element being exposed to the pressure of the fluid flowing through the orifice and into the pipe when the sleeve valve element is releasably retained and the lower surface 7 being exposed to the static pressure of the fluid downstream of said tubular member, whereby the sleeve valve element is subjected to the pressure differential forces on opposite sides thereof,

said releasable retaining means being released by the existence of a predetermined pressure differential across said sleeve valve element which is created by a predetermined increase in velocity of flow through the orifice and into the pipe string in which event the sleeve valve element is moved upwardly to close flow into the string and the pressure differential which is created by an increase in pressure applied against the upper end of the sleeve valve element through the pipe string when said seat on said tubular member is closed in which event the sleeve valve element is moved downwardly to uncover the cementing ports to allow cementing downwardly through said tubular member.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,874,785 2/1959 Muse 166-225 3,011,559 12/1961 Muse et a1. 166225 3,273,650 9/1966 Alexander et al 166225 3,376,935 4/1968 Baker 166224 CHARLES E. OCONNELL, Primary Examiner.

I. A. CALVERT, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2874785 *Apr 27, 1953Feb 24, 1959Baker Oil Tools IncApparatus for automatically filling well conduits with fluid
US3011559 *Dec 23, 1957Dec 5, 1961Baker Oil Tools IncSubsurface apparatus for automatically filling conduit strings
US3273650 *Apr 13, 1964Sep 20, 1966 Automatic fill-up and cementing devices for well pipes
US3376935 *Jan 24, 1966Apr 9, 1968Halliburton CoApparatus for use in wells
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3527299 *Nov 25, 1968Sep 8, 1970Dow Chemical CoFloat shoe apparatus
US5127482 *Oct 25, 1990Jul 7, 1992Rector Jr Clarence AExpandable milling head for gas well drilling
US6810958Dec 20, 2001Nov 2, 2004Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Circulating cementing collar and method
US7527104 *Feb 7, 2006May 5, 2009Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Selectively activated float equipment
US7644774Mar 9, 2009Jan 12, 2010Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Selectively activated float equipment
US20070181188 *Feb 7, 2006Aug 9, 2007Alton BranchSelectively activated float equipment
US20090166044 *Mar 9, 2009Jul 2, 2009Alton BranchSelectively Activated Float Equipment
EP1321624A1 *Dec 19, 2002Jun 25, 2003Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Self-filling cementing collar and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/328
International ClassificationE21B21/10, E21B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B21/103
European ClassificationE21B21/10C