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Publication numberUS3420065 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 7, 1969
Filing dateMar 6, 1967
Priority dateMar 6, 1967
Publication numberUS 3420065 A, US 3420065A, US-A-3420065, US3420065 A, US3420065A
InventorsHoll Edward J
Original AssigneeHoll Edward J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable bracing means for vertically disposed earth-shoring planking
US 3420065 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 7, 1969 E. J. HOLL 3,420,

ADJUSTABLE BRACING MEANS FOR VERTICALLY DISPOSED EARTH-'SHORING PLANKING Filed March 6, 1967 Sheet -of 2 INVENTOR:

, EDWARD J. nou.

ATTORNEY United States Patent 3 420,065 ADJUSTABLE BRACING MEANS FOR VER- TICALLY DISPOSED EARTH-SHORING PLANKING Edward J. H01], 320 Warwick Ave., South Orange, NJ. 07079 Filed Mar. 6, 1967, Scr. No. 620,803 US. Cl. 61-41 Int. Cl. E21d /06; E02d 29/00 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A brace disposable substantially horizontally between vertical channels of spaced, upright beams, in bracing association with vertical, earth retaining planks serially arranged adjacent to two or more of such beams; the brace being telescopically or equivalently adjustable in length and/ or having articulatedly connected parts making the brace distortable in longitudinal form to enable it to coact with said beams to support said planks.

Field of the invention The prior art In shoring means hitherto developed, employing vertical planking, a series of vertical planks, even though sometimes interlocked along adjacent side edges, required cross-bracing to be applied thereto to prevent the assembly of planks from bulging inwardly of the excavation. Such bulging is undesirable and often leads to complete failure of the shoring means.

The cross-bracing, however, has been rather haphazardly applied to the planking and has usually consisted of wooden cross members which were required to be cut, on the excavation job, to lengths which appeared suitable to the workmen putting the shoring into place. This haphazard way of providing cross-bracing involves considerable uncertainty as to the adequacy of the shoring a This invention, to eliminate such haphazard procedure and the resultant evils thereof, involves retention of vertical planking which is placed into the ground at a planned excavation; but includes the use of side-channeled beams driven vertically either in front of or in back of a series of upright planks and telescoping (or the equivalent) cross braces which may be easily adjusted in length to fit into the side channels of the beams. These braces and beams may be placed either in front of the vertical planking (ie at the excavation-side face of the planking) to prevent inward bulging of the latter or in back of the vertical planking with stud-held cleats on the cross braces to engage the planking to prevent it from bulging inwardly.

These cross braces are not only adjustable in length but also, optionally, may be distortable in a horizontal plane to permit their use even though the related vertical beams may have been driven with their side channels not in perfect facing relation to each other. To permit such horizontal distortion, opposite end portions of the cross brace may be pivoted, at vertical axes, to intermediate portions of the brace.

In the accompanying drawing 'FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a portion of preferred shoring means according to this invention as viewed from within the shored excavation; this illustrated arrangement being particularly recommended for use where the earth being excavated is relatively soft with a high water content.

FIG. 2 is a horizontal, sectional view substantially on the line 22 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view of the portion of FIG. 2 defined by a circle.

FIG. 4 is an elevational view of a modification of this invention which may be employed where the earth being excavated has a relatively low water content.

FIG. 5 is a horizontal, sectional view substantially on the line 55 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of a cross brace which is distortable in a horizontal plane to facilitate its use between up-right beams having side channels which are not in perfect facing relationship.

FIG. 7 is a horizontal sectional view substantially on the 7-7 of FIG. 6.

The embodiment of FIGS. 1-3

The shoring means of this, the first embodiment, comprise an aligned series of steel H-bearns 10 (only two being shown) driven vertically into the ground by any suitable driving means along a line corresponding approximately to the contemplated excavation. These H-beams are of such length as to extend downwardly approximately from the level of the earth before excavating to a point sufliciently below the floor of the excavation that they will be substantially supported in their upright positions by the earth into which they are driven.

Under conditions wherein the earth has some tendency to be self supporting, the H-beams may not require any supplemental support, but it is often desirable to provide supplemental support such as, for example, horizontal cross-struts, fragmentarily shown at 12, fitted tightly between H-beams at one side of a trench or other excavation and opposed H-beams at the opposite side of the excavation.

The first embodiment also comprises a series of vertically disposed corrugated steel planks 14, side edges of which internest to form a continuous earth supporting barrier in back of the series of H-beams; these planks being driven or otherwise suitably put into place in back of the H-beams.

FIGS. 2 and 3 show the corrugations of the planks 14 as being substantially angular, and the latter figure shows details of one suitable type of internesting for use between adjacent planks. Each plank 14 is illustrated as being more or less Z-shape in cross section with one side edge formed with a U-shaped socket 16 extending therealong and the opposite side edge formed with a bead 18- adapted to seat within such a socket of an adjacent plank.

Even though the planks 14 are internested, the pressure of the earth in back of the planking may strongly tend to bulge the planking inwardly of the excavation in areas between the H-bearns and break the internesting connections. As such bulging and/or breaking would constitute or lead to failure of the shoring, this invention also comprises one or more longitudinally adjustable, horizontal braces 20, extended between the webs 10a of successive H-beams with the ends of the brace or braces lying against rear flanges 10b of the H-beams and wedged firmly into place by suitable wedges 22 driven into place between the brace ends and front flanges 10c of the I-I-beams.

As illustrated as a component of the first embodiment, a brace 20 comprises hollow steel tubes 24a and 24b of rectangular shape in cross section; the former telescoping into the latter with a fairly close sliding fit. The brace 20, in non-extended form is easily located between successive H-beams and then extended to lie against and in front of the rear flanges 10b of said beams, after which suitable wedges 22 may be driven into place between the front flanges 10c of said beams and the ends of the brace to hold the latter against dislodgment.

The H-beams 1t} and the planks 14, ordinarily, are driven prior to or shortly after commencement of the excavating and the braces 20, in suitable number and spacing, are put into place as the excavation deepens.

It will be realized that the braces 20, by opposing inward bulging of the planking, also strongly oppose separation of adjacent planks 14 at their internesting edges. Thus, the corrugated planking not only supports the excavation wall very effectively but is sufliciently water tight to strongly oppose any excessive volume of Water from finding its way into the excavation.

The second embodiment (FIGS. 4 and Horizontal braces 30, which are utilized in the second embodiment, are fundamentally similar to the braces 20 of the first embodiment in that they are telescopically (or equivalently) extensible.

Each brace 30, as illustrated, comprises main, tubular members 32a, b, c, of rectangular shape in cross section, telescopically inter-associated by slidable, tubular sleeves 34, each having a cleat stud 36 welded to its front face. A cleat member 38 is held upon the stud 36 by a nut 40 threaded upon the stud.

When the shoring equipment is assembled, the studs 36 extend outwardly between successive planks 42 and the cleat members 38 overlie the inner faces of said planks to hold the latter firmly in earth supporting position and condition.

Where conditions call for additional studs, an additional stud-carrying sleeve 34 may be slidably positioned on the telescoping member 3212 as shown; and additional sleeves 34 may similarly be slidably positioned on one or both of the members 3242 and 0.

Earth shoring equipment according to the second embodiment may include angularly corrugated planking as shown in the first embodiment; but as internesting of plank edges is not resorted to in the second embodiment, the planking shown in the latter embodiment comprises sinuously corrugated metal planks 42 driven or disposed vertically in spaced relationship in an aligned series extended in front of a series of vertically driven H-beams (only two of the latter being shown).

The equipment of the second embodiment is employed somewhat differently than that of the first embodiment. Where the equipment of the second embodiment is employed, the earth, being of relatively low water content, is sufficiently self-supporting that, in many excavations, usually those of limited depth, the earth remains selfsupporting at least until parts of the shoring equipment are put into place as the depth of the excavation increases.

Thus, where earth of relatively low water content is being excavated, the H-beams 10 are vertically driven, in a series, in spaced relationship with the channels of successive H-beams facing each other; the H-beams being disposed along a line or lines substantially coincident with the planned excavation. The H-beams are preferably of such length and driven to such depth that their bottom ends will be below the planned floor level of the excava tion.

Then, the excavating progresses and, as the excavation deepens, the horizontal braces 30 are put into place between the H-beams and are telescopically extended to abut the webs 10a of the latter. The braces 30 are positioned against the inner faces of the front flanges 100 of the H-beams; and suitable wedges 22 inserted tightly between 4- the rear flanges 10b of the H-beams and the ends of the braces serve to hold the latter firmly in place.

When the excavating is completed or nearly completed, the metal planks 42 are vertically driven, or disposed in spaced relationship, in a plane extending in front of the H-beams. As this placing of the planks is done, the sleeves 34 are slid on the braces 30 so that the studs 36 line up with the spaces between the planks 42 and extend through said spaces, with the cleat members 38 in vertical attitude at the inner faces of said planks. After the placing of the planks, the cleat members 3-8 are turned to horizontal position and the nuts 4% are tightened to hold the cleat members firmly against the planks to hold the latter securely against inward bulging or dislocation.

A third form of horizontal brace is shown at in FIGS. 6 and 7 as comprising a central, tubular member 52 of rectangular shape in cross section and similar cross sectionally rectangular, tubular members 54, pivotally connected at vertical axes by pivot pins 56 to opposite ends of the central member 52; these pivotal connections preferably being such as to permit only limited pivotal movement of the members 54 relatively to the member 52 as indicated in chain lines in FIG. 6.

The brace 50 also includes tubular sleeves 58 slidably disposed on and extensible from the ends of the members 54 to enable the brace 50 to be extended and wedged into place similarly to brace 30 of the second embodiment. The sleeves 58 may include integral studs 36 which, if included, will permit the brace 50 to be used in much the same manner as brace 30 of the second embodiment. If the latter use is to be made of the brace 50, one or more studded, tubular sleeves 60 (only one being shown) may be slidably carried upon the member 52.

Moreover, a contractor doing an excavating job may keep a supply of end sleeves 58 with the studs 36 located in different positions therein (i.e., not necessarily centered thereon as illustrated) so that the inward projection of the studs 36 may be coordinated with the spaces between planks 42. The brace 50 is particularly useful where, as often occurs, successive H-beams are not driven with their flanges aligned in coplanar relation.

It should be understood that horizontal brace 50 may be employed similarly to brace 20 of the first embodiment, in which event, the studs 36 may be omitted if desired. However, even if said studs are not omitted in such use, they will not objectionably protrude into the excavation.

It will be understood that various types of internesting or interlocking means may be substituted for the head 18 and socket 16 arrangement illustrated in FIG. 3 and, also, that other types of corrugated planking may be employed instead of the planking shown in FIGS. 1-3. Thus, sinuously corrugated planks, such as shown at 42 in FIG. 4, may be employed in the first embodiment. In such a use however, the individual planks, extending in a plane in back of the H-beams, would not be spaced, but would be arranged. with side edge corrugations of each plank internested in adjacent side edge corrugations of adjacent planks.

It will be understood, also, that this improvement lends itself to various other forms of parts and other Ways of usage without departing from the invention as set forth in the following claims.

I claim:

1. In earth shoring means comprising a series of planks, vertically disposed in approximately coplanar relation and plural, substantially spaced side-channeled beams, vertically driven adjacent to and in back of said series; the improvement comprising plural braces each including plural elongate members slidably inter-related for and limited to contraction and extension longthwisely of the brace, enabling approximately horizontal disposition of the brace in back of said planks, in contracted condition, between successive beams, and extension, thereafter, into engagement of its opposite ends within facing channels of said successive beams; said braces including plural stud carrying members, slidably carried thereon and each of the latter members being provided with a frontwardly extending stud including thereon a cleat member and means for holding and adjusting the position of the cleat member on the stud; said stud being adapted to extend through spaces between successive planks, and said cleat member being arranged to overlie said successive planks to oppose frontward dislocation thereof.

2. In earth shoring means comprising a series of planks, vertically disposed in approximately coplanar relation and plural, substantially spaced side-channeled beams, vertically driven adjacent to said series; the improvement comprising plural braces each including plural elongate members slidably inter-related for and limited to contraction and extension lengthwisely of the brace, enabling approximately horizontal disposition of the brace, in contracted condition, between successive beams, and extension, thereafter, into engagement of its opposite ends within facing channels of said successive beams; one of said elongate members including an end portion pivotal about a vertical axis and another of said elongate members being slidably carried upon said end portion for lengthwisely contracting and extending the brace.

3. The improvement of claim 2, further comprising plural stud carrying members slidably carried upon said elongate members, each of said stud carrying members being provided with a laterally extending stud including thereon a cleat member and means for holding and adjusting the position of the cleat member on the stud.

4. In earth shoring means comprising a series of planks, vertically disposed in approximately coplanar relation and plural, substantially spaced side-channeled beams, vertically driven adjacent to said series; the improvement comprising plural braces each including plural elongate members slidably inter-related for and limited to contraction and extension lengthwisely of the brace, enabling approximately horizontal disposition of the brace, in contracted condition, between successive beams, and extension, thereafter, into engagement of its opposite ends within facing channels of said successive beams; each of said braces further including plural stud carrying members slidably carried non-rotatively upon its said elongate members and including studs extending laterally from the stud carrying members in approximate alignment longitudinally of the brace; each of said studs having a cleat member thereon and means for holding and adjusting the position of the cleat member on the stud, and the elongate members being held against material relative rotation; thereby maintaining said approximate alignment of all said studs on the brace.

5. The improvement of claim 4, said elongate members being telescopically inter-related, and of substantially complemental cross-sectional shapes to prevent relative rotation of the elongate members.

6. The improvement of claim 5, said stud carrying members being sleeves of substantially complemental cross-sectional shape relatively to said elongate members to prevent relative rotation of the latter members and the stud carrying members.

7. In earth shoring means comprising a series of substantially spaced side-channeled beams fixed in approximately vertical, coplanar positions adjacent to a wall of earth defining an excavation; a series of coplanar planks, disposed adjacent to said beams at the excavation side of the latter; plural, approximately horizontal, elongate braces disposed with their opposite ends extending into opposed side channels of successive beams of said series of beams, plural studs fixed to said braces at spaced points therealong and extending horizontally between successive planks of said series of planks, cleat members on said studs at the excavation side of said planks, and means on said studs for holding said cleat members against faces, of said successive planks, which face the excavation.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 686,536 11/1901 Rheubottom 61-41 1,895,985 1/1933 Goldsborough 6139 FOREIGN PATENTS 537,585 11/1931 Germany.

JACOB SHAPIRO, Primary Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R. 61--47

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US686536 *Aug 4, 1900Nov 12, 1901Frank C RheubottomGrave-curbing device.
US1895985 *Nov 16, 1928Jan 31, 1933Goldsborough John BConstruction of retaining walls
DE537585C *Nov 4, 1931Jean PalmZug- und druckfest miteinander verbundene zweischalige Auskleidung fuer Baugruben, Graeben u. dgl. aus Spundbrettern, die von Profileisen gehalten sind
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4114383 *Jan 16, 1978Sep 19, 1978Efficiency Production, Inc.Portal frame for trench box stack
US4674921 *May 4, 1984Jun 23, 1987Berger Lawrence ESeawall
US4690588 *Jun 5, 1986Sep 1, 1987C-Lock Retention Systems, Inc.Seawall
US4836718 *Mar 21, 1988Jun 6, 1989Schnabel Foundation CompanyEarth retaining method and structure with improved corrosion protection and drainage
US4917543 *Oct 11, 1988Apr 17, 1990Dayco Products, Inc.Wall system employing extruded panel sections
US5399057 *May 28, 1993Mar 21, 1995Cunic; Joseph M.Self-locking lagging strip
US6226936 *Aug 11, 1999May 8, 2001Glynn Geotechnical EngineeringSheet piling-supported modular wall system
US6350084Mar 7, 2001Feb 26, 2002Glynn Geotechnical EngineeringSheet piling-supported modular wall system
US6352230Mar 8, 2001Mar 5, 2002Glynn Geotechnical EngineeringSupport bracket for sheet piling-supported modular wall system
US6416259May 11, 2000Jul 9, 2002John H. MeyerCorner connection for temporary shoring
US6984092Jun 30, 2004Jan 10, 2006John Henry MeyerCorner connection for temporary shoring
US7128500Jun 10, 2004Oct 31, 2006Meyer John HCorner connection for temporary shoring
US7537417Jun 12, 2002May 26, 2009Meyer John HCorner connection for temporary shoring
US7883296Aug 28, 2008Feb 8, 2011Meyer John WShoring beam extension and reinforcement assembly
US7997830 *Dec 1, 2010Aug 16, 2011Pilepro, LlcBarrier wall made of sheet-pile components
US20040223814 *Jun 10, 2004Nov 11, 2004Meyer John H.Corner connection for temporary shoring
US20060002768 *Jun 30, 2004Jan 5, 2006Meyer John HCorner connection for temporary shoring
US20080145153 *Aug 31, 2007Jun 19, 2008Pilepro LlcBarrier Wall Made of Sheet-Pile Components
US20110076103 *Dec 1, 2010Mar 31, 2011Rob WendtBarrier wall made of sheet-pile components
EP0027576A1 *Oct 1, 1980Apr 29, 1981Josef KringsSupporting insert for use in apparatus for stiffening the sides of trenches
Classifications
U.S. Classification405/284
International ClassificationE02D17/02, E02D17/04
Cooperative ClassificationE02D17/04
European ClassificationE02D17/04