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Publication numberUS3420421 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 7, 1969
Filing dateSep 21, 1966
Priority dateSep 11, 1964
Publication numberUS 3420421 A, US 3420421A, US-A-3420421, US3420421 A, US3420421A
InventorsGustav Sigvald Hellberg
Original AssigneeMaurice V Wyatt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for perforation of sheet material
US 3420421 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 7,1969 G. s. HELLBERG MACHINE FOR PERFORATION OF SHEET MATERIAL Filed Sept. 21, 1966 Sheet was a a v M NH y 5 I v I v, I f I NveNro/z Gusmv 576mm HELLBEEa BY ATTORNEYS Jan. 7, 1969 5, s. RG 3,420,421

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MACHINE FOR PERFORATION. 0F SHEET MATERIAL Filed Sept; 21; 1966- Sheet 6 of6 9989 a 9999s a? I 255 255/ v INVENTOR.

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United States Patent M 10,948/ 64 US. Cl. 22596 Int. Cl. B6511 35/10 24 Claims This application is a continuation in part of my United States patent application Ser. No. 464,289 filed June 16, 1965, now abandoned.

The present invention refers to a perforation machine of the kind where a sheet material in web form that is to be perforated is fed in contact with a tool which consists of a rotatable patrix roll provided with relief-like portions forming studs with a shape corresponding to the perforations, the sheet material being pressed against the end surfaces of the studs so that rupture indications are formed in the sheet material along the edges of the studs after which the sheet material is separated along said rupture indications by means of tangential frictional forces produced by a press roll. Such a machine is described in United States Patent No. 2,996,959.

In connection with such machines great problems have appeared with reference to the press roll which is extended over the whole length of the patrix roll. The mounting and the adjustment of each press roll relative to the axis and longitudinal length of the patrix roll is difficult and expensive because of the small tolerances and required dynamic balance involved. This means a great disadvantage as the outer surfaces of the ribs of each press roll, around the outer cylindrical outline of the respective press rolls, upon being damaged or worn requires replacement of the press roll. Another problem with such machines has reference to the patrix roll the surfaces of the studs of which have to lie on exactly the same diameter along the whole length of the roll. In other words, the tool diameter should not be allowed to vary. As will easily be seen these problems are particularly oppressive in countries where technically qualified people are scarce, and where it may be practically impossible to install such machines at all.

Among other problems encountered in the use of a single large press roll, one especially notices the difficulty in stopping the big mass of the press roll rapidly,'which causes the more slowly rotating patrix roll, which for certain reasons is stopped a little (circa 0.4 sec.) before the press roll, to become heat expanded in its studs that are exposed to the press roll, thereby tending to cause the rolls to stick to each other. In order to prevent this the press roll as to be moved outwardly from the patrix roll at the time of stopping the rolls by means of a device which because it also has to be returned to a resumed position having a permissive deviation from the original position within a few thousandths of a millimetre. Such a device is extremely expensive to manufacture. The above mentioned problems have been solved by the new perforation machine made according to the present invention.

By means of this machine the above mentioned problems are solved and a machine is provided wherein the adjustment of the individual press rolls can be done more exactly and the size of the latter can be reduced substantially, which causes less production of heat, less strain on the parts, and less mass to decelerate. Such a machine can be driven several times faster than the previous machines. By means of the invention the length of the patrix roll can become independent of the length of each press 3,420,421 Patented Jan. 7, 1969 roll whereby the former can be made considerably longer than heretofore and permit the use with broader webs possible. With the use of the invention one has only to increase the number of individual press rolls which does not cause any difficulties particularly if each press roll is individually driven. Furthermore the diameters of the different press rolls then can be allowed to vary along the length of the patrix roll. Besides providing for an easier handling of the machine all these advantages mean that the cost production becomes only a fraction of that of the prior machines.

The invention will be described in connection with the enclosed drawings, of which:

FIGURE 1 shows in a perspective view the central part of a perforation machine embodying a preferred form of the invention shown by way of example;

FIGURE 2 shows in a plane view a form of the machine having a patrix roll with two rows of press rolls in a machine made according to the invention;

FIGURE 3 and FIGURE 4 show in outline from the side another embodiment of the machine with one patrix roll and two rows of press rolls therealong a still further embodiment with three patrix rolls each with one row of press rolls therealong, respectively;

FIGURE 5 shows in a perspective view and partially in section an individual press roll mounted on a support and utilized in my invention;

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view of a perforating machine embodying a modified form of my invention particularly directed to perforating paper for making stamps, such as postage stamps;

FIGURE 7 is an end view of the machine shown in FIGURE 6;

FIGURE 8 is an enlarged end view of the working area of the patrix roll and press roll; and

FIGURE 9 is a front elevational view of a perforating machine similar to that of FIGURE 6 and showing the patrix roll and two rows of press rolls, three press rolls shown in one row and two press rolls shown in the other row.

A perforation machine according to a preferred form of the invention comprises a patrix roll 1, which is provided with relief-like portions forming studs 2 each with a shape corresponding to the desired perforations. A web 3 of sheet material is adapted to be advanced over guide roll 4 and around the patrix roll 1, at which location the sheet material is thereby first pressed radially inward of patrix roll 1 and against the end surfaces of the studs so that rupture indications are formed in the sheet material along the edges of the studs. A number of press rolls 5 are adapted to produce tangential frictional forces relative to the patrix roll 1 which separate the sheet material along said rupture indications at the edges of the studs. The press rolls preferably rotate in a direction opposite to the patrix roll, i.e. so that all of the press rolls rotate in the same direction, contrary to that of the patrix roll, at the working points, and rotate with many times greater peripheral speed than that of the patrix roll. The press rolls are mounted on supports 6 displaceable laterally of the machine on a bar 7 and each is driven by means of belts 8 from a common driving shaft 9. At the other side of the patrix roll a further row of press rolls may be provided, as shown in FIGURE 2, in order to cover the area of the patrix roll that at the front side is occupied by the supports 6.

As shown in FIGURE 5 each press roll 5 is on the surface thereof provided with ribs 10 which are obliqueangled to the roll generatrix. They are also slightly S- shaped because of the fact that the rectangular plates that form the ribs have been mounted oblique on the surface of a circular cylinder. For further details on the ribs and how they cooperate with the studs of the patrix roll reference is made to the above mentioned United States Patent No. 2,996,959 as the present invention does not concern the same details. However, it ought to be mentioned that the ribs are arranged inclined backwards in relation to the direction of rotation, which is the reason for stopping the patrix roll a little before the press roll as otherwise the studs will catch the ribs and bend them forward.

As seen in FIGURE 5, each press roll 5 by means of a conical press joint structure is attached to a shaft 11 which shaft is carried in the two assemblies of ball bearings 12 eccentrically mounted in a housing 13. To the other end of the shaft 11 a pulley 14 is attached. The housing 13 is mounted on the support 6 by means of a clamp joint. The adjustment of the press roll 5 radially inward and outward relative to the patrix roll 1 is performed by turning the housing 13. For that purpose the housing is provided with a cog wheel 15 which is turned by means of cog wheel key applied in a hole 16.

FIGURE 4 shows a modification of the machine wherein the patrix is divided into a plurality of individual patrix rolls 1 in succession. In this way one can easier vary the pattern of the patrix. Furthermore it is possible to give the patrix rolls different speeds which is desirable for a certain kind of perforation operation.

The press rolls are preferably so arranged that the ribs of two adjacent press rolls are inclined or biased in different directions so that the lateral forces caused by the oblique-angle of the ribs are balanced and the sheet material is stretched in a direction axially of the patrix roll.

In the described embodiment all of the press rolls of a row are driven by means of belts from a joint drive shaft. But of course each press roll can be driven from a separate drive means or the driving can be effected in another way, for instance pneumatically with an air turbine at each press roll.

When such perforating machines are used for perforation of such things as postage stamps where a tear-off perforation is to be made along lines or rows normal to each other a problem has appeared which consists in that the working resistance for the press roll increases shockingly when an axial line or row of studs comes to the place of interference between the patrix roll and the press roll producing a bounce or jolt. That means disturbances in the speed of the machine which has a deleterious effect on maintaining the relative positions and the appearance of the perforations. As any noticeable divergences in the accuracy of the perforations and in the correct positioning of the rows of perforations cannot be tolerated in this case of stamps, the problem is very great.

The purpose of the form of the invention illustrated in FIGURES 6 to 9, inclusive, is to solve the above mentioned problem, which purpose is fulfilled by the perforation machine made and used according to this modified form of the invention. The modified form of invention directed to the perforating of paper for stamps is described in connection with FIGURES 6 to 9, inclusive.

A perforating machine according to the modified form of the invention is provided with a patrix roll 21 with relief-like portions forming studs 22 with a shape corresponding to the desired perforations. In this case when one wants to produce a tear-off perforation in two directions normal to each other the studs are divided into axial rows 22A and circumferential rows 22B. A web 23 of sheet material is brought over guide rolls 24 and round the patrix roll 21, the sheet material being pressed against the end surfaces of the studs so that rupture indications are formed in the sheet material along the edges of the studs. A number of press rolls 25 are adapted to produce tangential frictional forces which separate the sheet material along said rupture indications. The press rolls 25 rotate in a direction opposite to the patrix roll 21, that is so that the opposite peripheral surfaces move in the same direction at the opposed working points. The press rolls rotate at a many times greater peripheral speed than that of the peripheral speed of the patrix roll.

In order to solve the problem encountered in perforating stamps the studs arranged in circumferential rows project, according to this modified form of the invention, further outwards from the surface of the patrix roll than the studs arranged in axial rows. Thereby each kind of studs can cooperate with its own set of press rolls. The axial rows of studs 22A cooperate with the press rolls 25A each of which is sufficiently short in axial length that it will fit between two adjacent circumferential rows of studs 22B which in turn cooperate with the press rolls 25B which, however, do not have to be limited in respect to its axial length. On the views of the modification shown in FIGURES 6 to 9, inclusive, there is not shown how the individual press rolls are mounted, but they can suitably be mounted and spread out round the periphery of the patrix roll so that there is a sufiicient space for driving and bearing means in the same manner as described in connection with FIGURES 1 to 5, inclusive.

It is important the the sheet web 23 is not dislocated or stretched out on the patrix roll 21 so that the distances between the perforation rows are altered. Therefore a large contact surface for the web against a major portion of the patrix roll is important. As will be seen in FIGURE 7 this is performed in that the guide rolls 24 are placed close to each other.

The press rolls 25A and 25B on their circumferential peripheries are provided with ribs 26 which are obliqueangled to the roll generatrix. As will be seen in FIGURE 8, they also form an angle with the roll radius, indicated as angle a in FIGURE 8, so that they incline backwards in relation to the direction of rotation. This negative rake or backward angle preferably has a size of between 05 and 10, and preferably of about 5, to radial lines through the respective ribs. In other respects, the press rolls are as described in connection with FIGURES 1 to 5, inclusive.

By the described device the problems encountered in making stamps has been solved and one can produce perforations that satisfy the existing demands found in the manufacture of postage stamps.

Although this invention has been described in its preferred form with a certain degree of particularity, it is understood that the present disclosure of the preferred form has been made only by way of example and that numerous changes in the details of construction and the combination and arrangement of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and the scope of the invention as hereinafter claimed.

What is claimed is:

1. A perforation machine of the kind wherein sheet material in web form that is to be perforated is fed in contact with a rotatable roll provided with relief-like portions forming studs each with a shape corresponding to a perforation to be formed, the sheet material being pressed against the end surfaces of the studs so that rupture indications are formed in the sheet material along the edges of the studs after which the sheet material is separated along said rupture indications by means of tangential frictional forces produced by press roll means, characterized by a plurality of press rolls which are independent of each other and individually adjustable and have a small extent axially in relation to the length of the patrix roll, each of the press rolls cooperating with only some of the relief-like portions of the roll.

2. A perforation machine according to claim 1, characterized by a structure in which the press rolls are arranged in a plurality of parallel rows, in each row of which the press rolls are mounted axially in line with each other so that the relief-like portions of substantially the whole patrix roll along its length may be met by press rolls.

3. A perforation machine according to claim 1, the press rolls being on their surface provided with ribs which are oblique angled in relation to the roll generatrix, characterized by that the press rolls are mounted so that the ribs of two adjacent press rolls are inclined in different directions so that the lateral forces caused by the oblique angle are balanced and the sheet material is stretched in the latitudinal direction.

4. A perforation machine according to claim 1, characterized by that each press roll to make it possible to adjust it radially in relation to the patrix roll is mounted eccentric'ally in a housing carried t-urnable on a support.

5. A perforation machine according to claim 4, characterized by the housing which is carried on the support by a clamp joint is provided with a cog wheel which for turning of the house at loosed clamp joint is adapted to cooperate with a cog wheel key applied in a hole in the support.

6. A perforation machine according to claim 4, characterized by that the supports of each row of press rolls are mounted displaceable on a bar parallel to the patrix roll for adjustment axially.

7. A perforation machine according to claim 1, characterized by that each of the press rolls are driven by means of individual belts from a joint shaft.

8. A perforation machine according to claim 1, characterized that the press rolls are pneumatically driven by an air turbine of each press roll.

9. A perforation machine according to claim 1, characterized by a plurality of patrix rolls arranged in succession with each its own row of press rolls, each of which patrix rolls carrying a part of the relief-like portions that are necessary for producing the desired perforation in the sheet material.

10. A perforation machine having a patrix roll and a press roll cooperating with perforating portions on the patrix roll, said patrix roll being rotatable in one direction and the press roll being rotatable in an opposite direction, said press roll having rib extending generally outwardly therefrom to direct the outer end portions of the ribs toward the patrix roll and against the perforating portions thereof, said ribs being inclined backwards relative to the said opposite direction of rotation, the said outer end portions of the ribs meeting the perforating portions of the patrix roll at said backward inclination.

11. A perforation machine as claimed in claim and in which said press roll rotates at a substantially greater peripheral speed than that of the patrix roll.

12. A perforation machine as claimed in claim 10 and in which there are a plurality of press rolls cooperating with the one patrix roll, each press roll cooperating with only some of said perforating portions of the patrix roll.

13. A perforation machine as claimed in claim 10 and in which said ribs are oblique-angled to the generatrix of the press roll.

14. A perforation machine as claimed in claim 13 and in which said ribs are partially S-shaped about the cylindrical peripheral outline of the press roll.

15. A perforating machine of the kind wherein sheet material in web form that is to be perforated is fed in contact with a rotatable patrix roll provided with relieflike portions forming studs extending radially outward from the cyindrical surface of the patrix roll, the end of each stud having a shape corresponding to a perforation to be formed, the sheet material being pressed against the end surfaces of the studs so that rupture indications are formed in the sheet material along the edges of the studs after which the sheet material is separated along said rupture indications by means of tangential frictional forces produced by rotating first press roll means and rotating second press roll means, the studs being arranged on the patrix roll in axial and circumferential rows for the production of perforations in rows disposed normal to each other, characterized in that the studs arranged in the circumferential rows project radially outward from the cylindrical surface of the patrix roll a different radial distance than the studs arranged in axial rows extend radially outward from the said cylindrical surface of the patrix roll, in that said first press roll means disposed for cooperation with the circumferential rows of studs are spaced circumferentially of the patrix roll from said second press roll means for cooperation with the axial rows of studs, in that the press roll means disposed for cooperation with the rows of studs projecting radially outward the greatest amount span the studs projecting radially outward the least amount to avoid engagement therewith, and that the press roll means disposed for cooperation with the rows of studs projecting radially outward the least amount extend between the rows of studs projecting radially outward the greatest amount to avoid engagement therewith.

16. A perforating machine as claimed in claim 15 and in which said rows of studs projecting radially outward the greatest amount are the circumferential rows, and the rows of studs projecting radially outward the least amount are the axial rows.

17. A perforating machine as claimed in claim 15 and in which the second press roll means comprise a plurality of press rolls each of which is positioned intermediate planes passing through the circumferential rows of studs normal to the axis of the patrix roll to avoid engagement therewith.

18. A perforating machine as claimed in claim 15 and in which the first press roll means comprise press rolls having maximum peripheral surfaces disposed to cooperate only with the circumferential rows of studs and to avoid the axial rows of studs, the second press roll means comprise press rolls having axial lengths disposed to permit cooperation of the press rolls of said second press roll means only with the axial rows of studs and to avoid the circumferential rows of studs, and in which the studs of the circumferential rows project radially outward of the patrix roll a greater amount than the studs of the axial row of studs project radially outward of the patrix roll.

19. In a perforating machine having a rotatable patrix roll over which a web of sheet material such as paper is moved with the rotation of the patrix roll for forming of perforations in the sheet material in correspondence with the disposition of perforation elements on the patrix roll and a rotatable press roll having its axis disposed parallel with the axis of the patrix roll for cooperation with the stud elements of the patrix roll in forming said perforations upon forward rotation of the press roll in a first direction, the improvement of a plurality or ribs extending along said press roll and protruding outwardly from the cyindrical surface of the press roll, said ribs in protruding outwardly being inclined at negative angles to lines extending radially outward of the press roll through the respective ribs to lean away from the forward movement of the ribs with said press roll rotating in said first direction.

20. The improvement as claimed in claim 19 and wherein said negative angle is on the order of about 5.

21. The improvement as claimed in claim 20 and wherein said negative angle is on the order of about 050 to about 10.

22. In a machine for perforating a web of paper or the like with perforations disposed in rows, the combination of a patrix roll having perforation forming elements formed thereon in rows to correspond with rows of perforations to be formed in the paper or the like, means for rotating the patrix roll in a first direction and to move the web of paper or the like against the patrix roll about the axis thereof in correspondence with the peripheral rotative speed and direction of the patrix roll to press the paper against said elements, and a rotatable press roll disposed adjacent said patrix roll to cooperate with said elements for perforating the paper or the like where pressed against said elements, said press roll being rotated in the opposite direction from the rotative direction of said patrix roll to correspond with the direction of the web of said paper or the like, said press roll being rotated at its periphery at a substantially greater speed than the peripheral speed of the patrix roll and of said web moving therewith, the said press roll at its periphery being provided with ribs which extend outwardly toward said press roll and said elements and against the paper or the like pressed against said elements to remove the paper or the like on said elements as said ribs revolve with the press roll, said ribs being inclined backwardly in relation to the direction of rotation of the press roll at an angle to radial lines through the axis of the press roll and the respective ribs to present a negative rake as the ribs remove paper or the like on said elements.

23. The combination claimed in claim 22 in which the backward angle of said ribs is of the order of 0.5 to 10.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 8/1957 Marogg 83-343 X 8/1961 Hellberg et al 90-l1 JAMES M. MEISTER, Primary Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2801501 *Dec 21, 1955Aug 6, 1957Peter J Schweitzer IncApparatus for perforating paper
US2996959 *Oct 8, 1957Aug 22, 1961Alfredeen Uno AllanMeans for perforating paper and the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4711797 *Oct 29, 1985Dec 8, 1987Tetra Pak International AbPattern of crease lines for folding; differential rigidity, cardboard
US5065655 *Mar 9, 1990Nov 19, 1991Haber Terry MPill strip dispenser
US5119969 *Nov 14, 1991Jun 9, 1992Haber Terry MPill strip dispenser
US7160096Oct 24, 2003Jan 9, 2007Sealed Air CorporationPerforation mechanism for a foam-in-bag cushion and method of use
EP1527857A2 *Oct 22, 2004May 4, 2005Sealed Air Corporation (A Delaware Corporation)Perforation mechanism for a foam-in-bag cushion and method of use
Classifications
U.S. Classification225/96, 83/344, 225/97
International ClassificationB26F1/02, B26F1/24, B26D11/00, B26F3/00, B26F1/16
Cooperative ClassificationB26F1/24, B26D11/00, B26F1/16, B26F3/002, B26F1/02
European ClassificationB26F1/02, B26F1/24, B26F1/16, B26F3/00B, B26D11/00