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Publication numberUS3421632 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1969
Filing dateAug 18, 1966
Priority dateAug 18, 1966
Publication numberUS 3421632 A, US 3421632A, US-A-3421632, US3421632 A, US3421632A
InventorsFrancis E Wood
Original AssigneeFrancis E Wood
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rod-holding rack
US 3421632 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ROD-HOLDING RACK Filed Aug. 18, 1966 2,3 INVENTOR. A FRANCIS E. W000 'ATTORNEYS United States Patent 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A rack for holding rods in an upright position is described which is capable of reliably holding rods of different diameters in position. The rack includes a lower U-shaped horizontal member having an apertured slat member through which one end of the rods is to be inserted for support on a solid member beneath the aperture member. Spaced above the U-shaped member is a slat member having notches extending into one edge for holding the upper portion of the rod members. Each notch has a restricted opening across which a tab of flexible material normally extends. The tab is secured within the notch on one side of the opening and has an unsecured free end normally in overlapping relationship to the inner surface of a shoulder at the outer side of the opening. The shoulder acts to prevent the free end of the tab from moving outwardly relative to the notch and thereby maintains the opening closed for confinement of a rod within the notch. However, upon a rod being forceably inserted through the opening, the tab resiliently yields from the opening to permit insertion or withdrawal of a rod.

The present invention relates to racks for storing rod members and more particularly to a rack which can store rod members of different sizes.

Racks for holding rod members often are employed for displaying the rod members or for storing them ready for use. Such racks frequently are secured to walls to hold the rod members, such as fishing rods or cues, vertically against the wall. Generally, such racks are able to hold rod members of only limited sizes. For example, racks commonly employed in storing cues have spaced apart resilient fingers between which the rod members are wedged and held. Because of the spacing between the fingers, rod members having a diameter less than the finger spacing can fall from the rack. Besides the inconvenience of having to replace the fallen rods, rods which fall from the rack may be damaged. Hence, in order to properly store rod members of different sizes, it has been necessary either to use different racks having different finger spacings, or to use a single rack whose fingers are spaced at different intervals.

Considerable advantage is therefore to be gained by the provision of a single multi-purpose rack of uniform construction which is characterized by being able to store rod members of any size without the likelihood that rods of certain sizes will occasionally fall from the rack. Additional advantages will be realized where the rack of the present invention is constructed so that rod members of all sizes only forcibly can be placed on and removed from the rack.

The present invention provides an improved rack for storing rod members as characterized above. More particularly, the present invention is a multi-purpose rack including at least two spaced apart members. One of the members is provided with notches along one of its edges for storing rod members. For confining the rod members in the notches, each notch has a resilient band, for example, of rubber, placed therein and secured to the por- ICC tion of the member defining the notches. Each band is transversely cut to allow rod members to pass therethrough to be inserted and withdrawn from the enclosure defined by the resilient band. In its most preferred embodiment, the resilient band is cut without removing any material, i.e., sliced. In this way, any rod member, no matter how small its diameter, can be placed within the enclosures, and the resilient bands will constrain them within the enclosures. To further aid in constraining the rod members within the enclosures, each band is sliced at a location adjacent the portion of the member defining the notch proximate the notch opening. Rod members are inserted and withdrawn from the enclosures by leaving the free end portion of each hand between the slice and notch unsecured. The unsecured portion of each band forms a flexiblie tab which normally extends across the notch opening to close the same, but gives way to a rod being forcibly inserted and withdrawn from each notch enclosure to allow the rod members to pass through each band.

In use the rack generally is mounted to a wall with the notched member spaced above a second member. The second member vertically supports one end of the rod members being stored by the multi-purpose rack. The notched member serves to hold the opposite end of each rod member against the wall. Because of the ability of the rack to properly hold rod members of any size, the rack of the present invention can be used to store various types of rod members, for example, fishing rods, cues, rifies as well as other devices having rod shaped members. Hence, the rack of the present invention can be employed for a variety of purposes, most notably for display, temporary storage and permanent storage purposes. Furthermore, a single rack constructed in accordance with the present invention can be used to store simultaneously different kinds of rod members, large and small.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a multi-purpose rack for storing rod members of any size.

More particularly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a multi-purpose rack for storing different size rod members without the likelihood that rods of certain sizes will occasionally fall from the rack.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a multi-purpose rack wherein rod members of all sizes only forcibly can be placed on and removed from the rack.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a multi-purpose rack of uniform construction which simultaneously can store different size rod members.

The invention possesses other objects and features of advantage, some of which, with the foregoing will be set forth in the following description of the preferred form of the invention which is illustrated in the drawing accompanying and forming part of the specification. It is to be understood, however, that variations in the showing made by the said drawing and description may be adopted within the scope of the invention as set forth in the claims.

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the multi-purpose rack of the present invention.

FIGURE 2 is a partial perspective view of the rod holding member of the rack of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a plan view of the rod holding member of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 4 is a plan view of the rod supporting member of the rack of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 5 is a cross sectional view of FIGURE 3 taken along line 5-5.

FIGURE 6 is a cross sectional view of FIGURE 4 taken along line 66.

Referring to FIGURE 1, the multi-purpose rack 11 of the present invention includes a first member 12 for holding rod members, such as a fishing rod 13. Member 12 defines a plurality of notches 14 along an edge 16 thereof within which rod members 13 are inserted and held. A second member 17 is mounted spaced from the member 12 and serves to give additional support to the rod members 13 placed on rack 11. The distance between the members 12 and 17 is adjusted in accordance with the lengths of the rod members 13 to be stored on the rack 11. In most uses of the multi-purpose rack 11, the mernbers 12 and 17 are arranged horizontally to hold the rod members 13 vertically against a wall 18.

The rod members 13 are held within the notches 14 by a resilient rubber band 19 secured within each notch 14 to the portion of the horizontal member defining each notch 14. As shown in FIGURES 2 and 3, each band 19,

defines an enclosure 21 for receiving the rod members 13 to be stored on rack 11. In order to insert and withdraw rod members from the enclosures 21, each band 19 is transversely cut at 22, preferably sliced so that any rod member 13 which can fit into the enclosure 21 will be firmly held by the rack 11.

To insure that the rod members 13 are securely held by rack 11, one embodiment of the rack of the present invention is constructed so that each notch 14 defined by horizontal member 12 has an inner region 23 of larger width for holding the rods which are separated from edge 16 by an outer region 24 having a smaller or restricted width portion to define the notch opening. Horizontal member 12 defines a shoulder 26 interiorly of the notch opening and extending from the smaller Width portion of the outer region 24 to the larger width of the inner region 24. The resilient bands 19 are secured to the portion of the horizontal member 12 defining the inner region 23. Each band 19 is oriented so that its transverse slice 22 is positioned adjacent the inner surface of shoulder 26. The segment 27 of each band 19 adjacent shoulder 26 between slice 22 and the notch opening or smaller width portion of the outer region 24 is kept unsecured. The unsecured segment 27 of band 19 forms with the segment 28 of band 19 extending across the smaller width portion of the outer region 24 (see left hand notch of FIGURE 3) a flexible tab 29 which normally engages the inner surface of shoulder 26 to confine a rod within the inner region, but which (see right hand notch of FIGURE 3) gives way to a rod member 13 being inserted and Withdrawn from each enclosure 21.

With the rack 11 constructed to have the slice 22 of band 19 lying adjacent the shoulder 26, the rod members 13 must be forcibly inserted and withdrawn from'the rack 11. Hence, with such a construction, the liklihood that the rod members 13 will occasionally fall from the rack 11 will be remote.

To facilitate inserting and withdrawing the rod members 13 from the enclosure 21, the horizontal member 12 is constructed to define saddle shaped notches 14 having adjoining trapezoidal outer region 24 and circular segment inner region 23. Each notch 14 is formed so that the longer of the parallel sides of the trapezoidal region 24 is at the edge 16 of the horizontal member 12. The trapezoidal region extends from the edge 16 to join at its smaller parallel side the circular segment region 23. The circular segment region 23 of each notch 14 is a circular segment greater than 180 degrees to define an arcuate shoulder 26 sloping towards the joint formed by the adjoining trapezoidal and circular segment regions. Each enclosure 21 is defined by circular resilient bands 19 secured to the portion 31 of horizontal member 12 defining the circular segment region 23. Because the arcuate shoulder 26 slopes towards the trapezoidal region 24, the rod members 13 can be inserted and withdrawn from the enclosure 21 more easily.

With reference to FIGURE 2, the manner in which the rod members are inserted, withdrawn and held within enclosure 21 is shown. More particularly, the left hand notch 14 illustrates the rod member 13 positioned within the enclosure 21. The center notch 14 shows the manner in which the rod members 13 are inserted into the enclosure 21. As illustrated, the rod members being inserted within the enclosure 21 force the flexible tab 29 inwardly away from the shoulder 26 to allow the rod members to pass from the trapezoidal region 24 into the circular enclosure 21. The right hand notch 14 shows how the rod members 13 are withdrawn from the enclosure 21. As portrayed, the rod members being withdrawn froce the flexible tab 29 outwardly to allow them to pass from the circular enclosure 21 to the trapezoidal region 24.

The foregoing description has been concerned with the detailed manner in which the rack 11 holds one end of the rod members to be stored thereon. Considering now horizontal member 17, attention is directed to FIGURES l, 4 and 6. To fix in position the rod members being stored, horizontal member 17 is a U-shaped member having an apertured upper member 32 and a solid lower member 33 interconnected by a web member 34. The U-shaped horizontal member 17 is mounted so that the apertured member 32 faces the notched horizontal member 12. The apertures 36 defined by U-shaped member 17 preferably are in vertical registry with the notches 14 defined by member 12 so that each aperture 36 receives the end of the rod member 13 held in the registered notch 14. Solid member 33 receives the ends of the rod members 13 thereon and renders vertical support to the rod members 13.

By employing the aforedescribed U-shaped horizontal member 17, further insurance against rods occasionally falling from the rack 11 is obtained. As noted hereinabove, the solid member 33 provides vertical support to the stored rod members 13. The apertured member 32 prevents the stored rod members 13 from slipping sideways along or off the solid member 33 whereby the rod members 13 can vertically slip out of enclosure 21. It should be noted that the side slipping could' be prevented without using the aperture member 32 by providing recesses in solid member 33;

In its simplest form, the horizontal members of rack 11 are separately mounted to the wall 18. With reference to FIGURES 5 and 6, the rack 11 can be mounted to wall 18 by securing L-shaped brackets 37 to the notched horizontal member 12 at spaced locations, and fastening the 'brackets to wall 18. The U-shaped horizontal member 17 can be fastened to the wall 18 by'screws (not shown) passed through screw holes 38 provided at spaced locations along web member 34. Of course other techniques can be employed to secure the rack 11 to the wall 18, for example, the horizontal members could be placed in a frame which in turn could be secured to the wall 18.

In one rack constructed in accordance with the present invention'for storing fishing rods, the horizontal members 12, 32, 33 and 34 were slats 2 inches wide and inch thick, the apertures 36 were 1 inch in diameter, the large parallel side of the trapezoidal region 24 of notch 14 was /8 inch, the small parallel side A inch, the depth of region 24 was inch, the distance from edge 16 to the center of curvature of circular segment region 23 was 1% inches, the radius of curvature "of the circular segment region 23 was inch, the spacing between members 32 and 33 was 1% inches, the spacing between horizontal members 12 and 17 was 48 inches, and rubber resilient member was fi inch thick.

- While the multi-purpose rack of the present invention has 'been described in detail with reference to a single embodiment, it is apparent that numerous modification are possible within the scope of the invention. For example, instead of using a 'band of resilient material in each notch 14, a length of resilient material placed across each notch opening could be employed, the length of resilient material arranged to function in the manner of resilient tab 29. Also slice 22 could be positioned in the notch opening. Hence, the present invention is not intended to be limited except by the terms of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A rack for holding rod members comprising a first member for supporting one end of a rod member, a second member mounted in spaced relationship to said first member and having at least one notch at an edge thereof adapted to receive and support a rod member, said notch having a restricted width portion defining an opening into an enlarged rod holding portion thereof, and a tab of flexible material extending across said restricted portion to normally close said opening, said tab being secured within said notch on one side of said restricted width portion and having an unsecured free end overlapping the inner surface of a shoulder defined at the other side of said restricted width portion, said shoulder normally blocking movement of the free end of said tab outwardly of said notch to thereby maintain said tab in closing relation across said opening to confine a rod member within the rod holding portion of said notch, and said ta-b yielding resiliently to a forcea'ble insertion of a rod member through said opening to permit intentional insertion or wthdrawal of such rod member.

2. The rack according to claim 1 further including a third member mounted closely spaced from said first member between said first and second members, said third member defining an aperture in vertical registry with each notch to receive therethrough the end of said nod members supported on said first member.

3. The rack according to claim 1 wherein each notch is saddle shaped having an arcuate portion defined by said second member distal its notched edge to define said enlarged rod holding portion, and said resilient member is a band secured to said second member along its portion defining the arcuate portion of said saddle shaped notch and is transversely sliced to provide said unsecured free end allowing rod members to pass therethrough.

4. The rack according to claim 3 wherein each saddle shaped notch defined by said second member has a trapezoidal portion extending inwardly from said notched edge with its base at said notched edge and adjoining a circular segment portion greater than 180 degrees which provides said rod holding portion.

5. The rack according to claim 4 wherein said resilient band is circular and is secured to said member along its portion defining said circular segment portion of said notch, said resilient band is sliced at a location adjacent the portion of said member defining said circular segment portion proximate the joint formed by said adjoining circular segment and trapezoidal portion of said notch.

6. The rack according to claim 5 wherein said first and third members are joined by a web member to define therewith an integral U-shaped channel member.

7. The rack according to claim 6 wherein said first member is a slat, said second member is a slat defining a plurality of said saddle shaped notches along one of its edges, and said third member is a slat defining a plurality of apertures in vertical registry with said saddle shaped notches.

8. The rack according to claim 7 further including a first means for horizontally mounting said second memher to a wall with said notched edge facing away from said wall, and a second means for horizontally mounting said U-shaped channel member to said wall.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 407,560 7/1889 Wilson et a1. 21167 450,858 4/1891 Zan 211- 658,042 9/ 1900 Mendel 21163 722,546 3/ 1903 Werle 211-62 1,174,185 3/1916 Scott 211-68 1,221,584 4/1917 Patrick 21160 X 1,678,353 7/ 1928 Reach 21160 X 2,721,680 10/1955 Steckman 2l1--60 X CHANCELLOR E. HARRIS, Primary Examiner.

FRANK DOMOTOR, Assistant Examiner.

U.S. Cl. X.R. 248-

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3635433 *Jun 11, 1969Jan 18, 1972Anderson Malcolm JArticle-holding apparatus
US4003612 *Jan 16, 1976Jan 18, 1977Munsell Robert FFishing tackle rack
US4015810 *Dec 15, 1975Apr 5, 1977Acr Electronics, Inc.Automatic float-off storage bracket
US4036368 *Jun 5, 1975Jul 19, 1977Daniel MunschFishing rod appliance
US4582203 *Feb 22, 1985Apr 15, 1986Davis Henry FFishing rod holder
US4796762 *Jun 24, 1987Jan 10, 1989Law Donel GStorage rack
US4871099 *Jun 24, 1988Oct 3, 1989Bogar Jr Earl MFishing rod holder
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US5072539 *Jan 23, 1991Dec 17, 1991Greenberg Philip JFishing pole holder
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US7877920Oct 22, 2004Feb 1, 2011Provo Steel & Supply Co.Door-mounted rifle rack
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US20130055621 *Sep 4, 2012Mar 7, 2013Gary FongFishing rod rest
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US20150097095 *Jul 9, 2014Apr 9, 2015Codiflex Indústria e Comércio de Manufaturados Ltda.Flat angled bracket
US20150201601 *Jan 21, 2015Jul 23, 2015Michael A. HonermannRack for ice fishing accessories
USRE44568Aug 11, 2010Nov 5, 2013Prosteel Security Products, Inc.Gun safe door storage system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification211/70.8, 248/110
International ClassificationA47B81/00, A47F7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B81/005, A47F7/0028
European ClassificationA47F7/00C1, A47B81/00D