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Publication numberUS3422391 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1969
Filing dateApr 7, 1967
Priority dateApr 7, 1967
Publication numberUS 3422391 A, US 3422391A, US-A-3422391, US3422391 A, US3422391A
InventorsThomson Warren D
Original AssigneeThomson Warren D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for splicing electrical wires
US 3422391 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 14, 1969 w. D. THOMSON 3,422,391

DEVICE FOR SPLICING ELECTRICAL WIRES Filed April 7, 1967 INVENTOR. WAEeE/v 0. THO/1480M United States Patent 3,422,391 DEVICE FOR SPLICING ELECTRICAL WIRES Warren D. Thomson, Dayton, Wash. (1124 Benjamin Ave., 'Clarkston, Wash. 99403) Filed Apr. 7, 1967, Ser. No. 629,257 US. Cl. 339-97 6 Claims Int. Cl. H01r 11/20; A44b 21/00; 110% 3/00 ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A wire connector consisting of a cruciform body of bendable sheet metal bent to define two opposite pairs of opposing jaws. One pair of jaws has opposed inwardlyextending teeth at its transverse end edges. The other pair of jaws has opposed teeth extending inwardly from the side edges thereof.

This invention relates to wire connectors, and more particularly to devices for connecting insulated wires together electrically without the necessity of making soldered connections or of stripping the insulation from the wires.

A main object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved connector for insulated wires of the type having prongs which pierce the insulation of the wires to be electrically connected together while, at the same time, mechanically-clamping the wires in connected relationship, the device being simple in construction, being easy to install, and forming a secure and reliable electrical connection as well as a firm mechanical connection between the wires with which the device is employed.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved wire connector of the insulation-piercing type, the connector being inexpensive to manufacture, being durable in construction, being compact in size, and being applicable to the wires to be connected in a manner permitting its use in relatively constricted spaces as well as in locations where ample space for installation is available.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved electrical connector for use with insulated wires, as well as with wires of the non-insulated type, the device being of inexpensive, one-piece construction, being easy to fabricate, and being arranged so that it can be installed by means of very simple squeezing operations which can be performed, using simple tools.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent form the following description and claims, and from the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view showing the manner of use of a typical connector constructed in accordance with the present invention, employed to connect one insulated wire to another insulated wire.

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged perspective view of the connector employed in FIGURE 1 with the jaws thereof separated preparatory to use.

FIGURE 3 is a side elevational view of the wire connector of FIGURE 2 showing the jaws thereof in wirecontacting and gripping positions.

FIGURE 4 is a plan view of a sheet metal blank employed to form a wire connector such as is illustrated in FIGURES 1, 2 and 3.

FIGURE 5 is a rear end elevational view of the wire connector of FIGURE 2 with the jaws thereof shown in closed, wire-gripping positions,

Referring to the drawing, 11 generally designates an improved device for connecting insulated wires, constructed in accordance with the present invention. The device 11 comprises a body of sheet metal formed with a relatively long first pair of opposing bendable jaws 12 and 13, the side edges of the respective jaws being provided with inwardly-directed rows of pointed spurs shown at 14 and 15. The spurs on the side edges of one of the jaws are longitudinally-staggered with respect to the spurs on the side edges of the other jaw. Thus, in the typical example shown, the side edges of the jaw 12 have three uniformly-spaced spurs 14 and the side edges of the jaw 13 have four uniformly-spaced spurs 15, the spurs 14 and 15 being substantially identical in size and shape, but the spurs 14 being staggered relative to the spurs 15 with respect to the longitudinal direction of the body of the connector. Furthermore, the spurs on one of the jaws are offset inwardly relative to the spurs on the other jaw, for example, the planes of the spurs 14 are parallel to, but are spaced inwardly from the planes of the spurs 15, as shown in FIGURE 5. It will thus be readily apparent that the arrangement of the jaws 12 and'13 and their associated spurs 14 and 15 is such that the jaws may be squeezed together transversely on a first insulated electrical conductor 16 in the manner shown in FIGURE 1, and as a result of the squeezing pressure applied to urge the opposing jaws 12 and 13 inwardly, the spurs 14 and 15 will penetrate the insulation of the conductor and will engage the central conductor 17, making electrical contact therewith. At the same time, due to the inwardly-olfset relationship of the spurs 14 relative to the spurs 15, the spurs will not interfere with each other and are free to exert tight gripping action on the central conductor 17. Also, the staggered relationship of the spurs 15 with respect to the spurs 14 insures that effective tight electrical contact will be made with the center conductor wire 17 as a result of the application of a squeezing force to the opposing jaws 12 and 13, as above-described.

The opposite end of the body of the conductor is formed with another pair of opposing bendable jaws 18 and 19 whose central longitudinal plane is perpendicular to the central longitudinal plane of the first-described jaws 12 and 13. The transverse end edges of the jaws 18 and 19 are likewise provided with inwardly-directed, staggered pointed spurs shown at 20 and 21. Thus, as shown in FIGURE 2, the top jaw 18 is provided with three uniformly-spaced, transversely-arranged pointed spurs 20 and the bottom jaw 19 is provided with two uniformly spaced, transversely-arranged spurs 21 staggered relative to the spurs 20 in a transverse direction. However, the lower set of spurs 21 is inwardly-offset relative to the upper set of spurs 20, as shown in FIGURE 3, to provide mutual clearance for the spurs when they are squeezed together on an insulated wire 23 to make an electrical and mechanical connection thereto. Thus, in connecting one insulated wire 23 to another insulated wide 16, the insulated wire 16 may first be placed between the jaws 12 and 13 in a transversely-extending relationship relative thereto, as shown in FIGURE 1, and squeezing pressure may be applied to the jaws 12 and 13, for example, by the use of a pair of ordinary pliers, with the squeezing force exerted vertically, as viewed in FIG- URE 1. The second insulated wire 23 may then have its end inserted between the jaws 18 and 19 and squeezing force may then be applied to the jaws 18 and 19 by means of the pair of pliers, with the squeezing force exerted horizontally, as viewed in FIGURE 1. In the case of the first wire 16, the spurs 14 and 15 are forced into electrical contact therewith, after penetrating through the insulation of the wire. In the case of the second wire 23, spurs 20 and 21 on the jaws 18 and 19 are similarly forced through the insulation of the wire and are forced into electrical and mechanical contact with the central conductor 24 of the insulated wire 23, In both cases the wires 16 and 23 are firmly and securely gripped by the respective sets of jaws 12, 13 and 18, 19, and are also electrically-connected together because of the electrical contact made by the 3 respective sets of spurs 14, 15 and 20, 21 with the conductors 17 and 24.

The device 11 is preferably made from a single piece of bendable sheet metal, such as a generally cruciformshaped blank 30, shown in FIGURE 4. The blank 30 is shaped with the two opposing jaws 12 and 13 extending longitudinally thereof, the side edges of the jaws being formed with the spurs 14 and 15, as above-described, the side marginal portions of the jaws being bendable along longitudinal fold lines shown at 31 and 32. The blank also includes transversely-extending jaw elements 18 and 19 formed at their ends with the sets of pointed spurs 20 and 21, above-described, the jaws 18 and 19 being bendable along longitudinal fold lines 33, 33, as shown. The fold lines 31 and 32 are offset inwardly slightly relative to the fold lines 33, and short slits 34 are provided to facilitate the folding of the serrated side portions of the jaws 12 and 13 on the fold lines 31 and 32. The slits 34 extend to said fold lines 31 and 32, as shown. The serrated end portions of the jaw elements 18 and 19 are foldable inwardly on fold lines 35 and 36, as shown. Jaws 12 and 13 are foldable on transverse fold lines 37 and 38', so that the jaws 12 and 13 may be folded to the opposing configuration of FIGURE 2, whereas, the jaws 18 and 19 may be similarly folded to the opposing configuration, also shown in FIGURE 2. After folding, a generally rectangular transversely-extending center portion 38 is thus defined between the two sets of opposing jaws.

The connector device is preferably coated with copper or other suitable non-corrosive metal, to prevent corrosion of the connector and to allow it to be satisfactorily employed even in relatively adverse environments. If so desired, the exterior surfaces of the connector may be coated with suitable insulating material.

The size of the pointed spurs 14, 15, 20 and 21 may vary in accordance with the specific requirements of use of the connector, for example, may be approximately inch long for large-sized clamps, and may be as small as A of an inch in length for smaller-sized clamps.

The connectors are especially suitable for direct current applications, such as with automotive equipment. The thickness of sheet metal employed to fabricate the connectors may be approximately 24 gauge.

In the specific embodiment illustrated in the drawing, the jaws 12, and 13, respectively, have three and four pointed spurs at their side edges, and the jaws 18 and 19, respectively, have three and two pointed spurs at their transverse end edges. Obviously, the number of spurs employed may be varied in accordance with the specific requirements for which the connectors are designed.

While a specific embodiment of an improved device for connecting insulated wires has been disclosed in the foregoing description, it will be understood that various modifications within the spirit of the invention may occur to those skilled in the art. Therefore, it is intended that no limitations be placed on the invention except as defined by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A device for attachment to wires to establish electrical connections therebetween comprising a body of conductive metal formed with a first pair of bendable jaws having opposed pointed spurs at their side edges to penetrate the insulation of and make contact with the conductor of an insulated wire clampingly-received transversely therebetween when the jaws are squeezed together, said body being formed with a second pair of bendable jaws opposite said first pair having transverse end edges and having opposed pointed spurs at their transverse end edges to penetrate the insulation of and make contact with the conductor of another insulated wire clampingly-received therebetween perpendicular to the first-named insulated wire when said second pair of bendable jaws are squeezed together, whereby to electrically connect the two insulated wires, wherein the spurs at the side edges of one of the jaws of the first pair are offset inwardly relative to the spurs at the side edges of the other jaw of said first pair, wherein the opposing spurs at the transverse end edges at the second pair of jaws are offset relative to each other, and wherein the spurs at the side edges of one of the jaws of the first pair are staggered longitudinally relative to the spurs at the side edges of the opposing jaw of said first pair.

2. The attachment device of claim 1, and wherein the opposing spurs at the transverse end edges of the second pair of jaws are longitudinally staggered relative to each other.

3. The attachment device of claim 2, and wherein said body is formed from a single piece of sheet metal.

4. The attachment device of claim 3, and wherein said body is originally of substantially cruciform shape, said respective sets of jaws being formed from opposing arms of the cruciform sheet metal body.

5. The attachment device of claim 2, and wherein the median longitudinal planes of the respective pairs of bendable jaws are perpendicular to each other.

6. The attachment device of claim 5, and wherein said body of conductive metal includes a generall rectangular transversely-extending center portion, said first pair of bendable jaws extending from the opposite side edges of said generally rectangular portion and said second pair of jaws extending from the top and bottom edges of said generally rectangular portion.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 963,425 7/ 1910 Dusinberre 339-255 1,508,475 9/ 1924 Pons 339-255 1,543,524 6/1925 Sherman 339-261 1,779,442 10/ 1930 Mueller 339-255 2,444,229 6/ 1948 Johnson 339-255 2,534,881 12/1950 Schroeder 174-84 FOREIGN PATENTS 109,050 11/ 1939 Australia.

MARVIN A. CHAMPION, Primary Examiner.

JOSEPH H. McGLYNN, Assistant Examiner.

U.S. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US963425 *May 29, 1909Jul 5, 1910George Brown DusinberreConnecting-clip.
US1508475 *Jun 9, 1923Sep 16, 1924Eugene PonsClip
US1543524 *Apr 24, 1924Jun 23, 1925Sherman Howard BBattery clip
US1779442 *Feb 27, 1925Oct 28, 1930Mueller Electric CompanyElectrical connection clip
US2444229 *Oct 19, 1945Jun 29, 1948Johnson Harold SElectrical clip
US2534881 *Apr 20, 1946Dec 19, 1950Schroeder Henry JElectrical wire connector with insulation piercing means
AU109050B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3825881 *Dec 29, 1972Jul 23, 1974Burndy CorpTermination device for flat electrical conductors
US4019801 *Jan 19, 1976Apr 26, 1977Amp IncorporatedElectrical splice
US4085995 *Jun 27, 1977Apr 25, 1978Amp IncorporatedElectrical terminal
US4154497 *Jan 16, 1978May 15, 1979International Standard Electric CorporationStripless electrical contact
US4324450 *Mar 5, 1980Apr 13, 1982Amp Inc.Drop wire terminal
US4346501 *May 21, 1980Aug 31, 1982Saiya Robert FHeadset cable strain relief clamp
US5090097 *May 28, 1991Feb 25, 1992Koester Jr Frank APlastic clip
US5934518 *Jun 5, 1997Aug 10, 1999Homax Products, Inc.Aerosol texture assembly and method
US6224433 *Oct 20, 1999May 1, 2001Fci Usa, Inc.Electrical connector for crossing reinforcing bars
US8313011Dec 12, 2011Nov 20, 2012Homax Products, Inc.Systems and methods for applying texture material to ceiling surfaces
US8342421Oct 18, 2011Jan 1, 2013Homax Products IncTexture material for covering a repaired portion of a textured surface
US8580349Dec 6, 2011Nov 12, 2013Homax Products, Inc.Pigmented spray texture material compositions, systems, and methods
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/410, 174/71.00R, 24/329
International ClassificationH01R4/24
Cooperative ClassificationH01R4/2404
European ClassificationH01R4/24A