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Publication numberUS3422563 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 21, 1969
Filing dateOct 19, 1964
Priority dateOct 19, 1964
Publication numberUS 3422563 A, US 3422563A, US-A-3422563, US3422563 A, US3422563A
InventorsKiley Renee S
Original AssigneeKiley Renee S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Elements with base having recesses for storing or standing same
US 3422563 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 21, 1969 R. s, KILEY 3,

ELEMENTS WITH BASE HAVI NG RECESSES FOR STORING OR STANDING SAME Filed Oct. 19, 1964 Sheet of 2 70 \2} ll- II H i :f k 2 2 2i lLl Hill u n u u u u u 55 I 76 54 12 %5 44 74 enee g zwmwazwa/ggzs Jan. 21, 1969 R. s. KILEY 3,422,563

ELEMENTS WITH BASE HAVING RECESSES FOR STORING OR 8 AAAAAAAAA ME Filed Oct. 19, 1964. Sheet 2 of 2 Patented Jan. 21, 1969 2 Claims This invention relates generally to assembly-type toys and more particularly to assembly-type toys that are suitable for use by small children.

Children of all ages derive considerable amusement and satisfaction from the type of play devices that call upon them to exercise their manipulative skills. Alphabet blocks are a tradition; and numerous other assembly-type toys have enjoyed considerable popularity, for example the assmbly-type toys comprising wooden dowels of various lengths and cooperating knuckles or joints having suitable bores for receiving the dowels. However, alphabet blocks provide no suggestion of an assembly objective and most other assembly-type toys rely on pictured objectives and printed assembly instructions for use in achievin the completed unit. Children who are too advanced for blocks but who are not yet able to read or follow pictured assembly steps with facility are thus denied this general type of amusement.

Therefore, an important object of the present invention is to fulfill this latter need and provide an assembly-type toy that is matched to the skill of pre-school age children.

Another object of the invention is to provide an assembly-type toy that comprises components which suggest the assembly objective.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a toy consisting of components that can be readily assembled by small children to reenact some aspect of a familiar story.

A further object of the invention is to provide a storytelling toy that is arranged to be assembled by small children to produce a satisfying three-dimensional effect without unduly taxing their manipulative skills.

A yet further object of the invention is to provide a story-telling toy of the type described which is compact and therefore both convenient and economical to handle, ship or mail.

A more general object of the invention is to provide a new and improved childrens toy.

These and other objects and features of the invention will become more apparent from the following descriptions.

A toy in accord with the invention includes a planar base and planar toy elements. The base is provided with two sets of recesses shaped respectively to receive the toy elements in prostrate and in upright positions. The toy elements are provided in the outline of and are decorated to represent story-book characters, the toy elements being adapted to be disposed in one set of recesses for shipping and handling and to be extractable from those recesses for fitted insertion of their ends in the other recesses for creating a scene from a childrens story.

In order that the principles of the invention may be readily understood, two embodiments thereof, but to which the application is not to be restricted are shown in the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a story-telling toy constructed in compliance with the invention and shown with the toy elements fitted into the recesses of the base in coplanar relationship therewith;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the base of FIG. 1 with the toy elements removed;

FIG. 3 is a low angle perspective view of the storytelling toy of FIG. 1 with the toy elements disposed in the base in upright position;

FIG. 3a is an enlarged, cross-sectional view taken through the material of the base;

FIGS. 4 and 5 are enlarged perspective views of two toy house elements used in the arrangement of FIGS. 1 and 3;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a modified toy constructed in compliance with the invention and showing the representation of a different story from that represented by the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5, the toy elements being shown in prostrate position relative to the base; and

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the toy of FIG. 6 with the toy elements disposed in upright position.

Referring now in detail to the drawings, specifically to FIGS. 1 and 3, a story-telling toy indicated generally by the numeral 10 will be seen to include a planar base 12 and a number of planar toy elements indicated respectively by alternate numerals from 14 to 34. The toy 10 is intended to suggest the story of The Three Little Pigs. Accordingly, toy elements 14, 16 and 18 are fash; ioned in the outline of and are decorated to represent The Three Little Pigs. Similarly, the toy element indicated by the numeral 20 is fashioned in the silhouette of and is decorated to represent The Big Bad Wolf. Cooperatively, toy elements 28, 30, 32 and 34 are fabricated to represent the side walls of the brick house built by the industrious little pig and the toy elements 24 and 26 represent roof sections thereof. Toy element 22 represents a tree which is used in developing a visually balanced composition in the assembled toy. The toy elements 14-34 may be advantageously fabricated by diecutting from cardboard stock of suitable thickness which has been printed with the necessary decorations for representing the various storybook characters. If desired, the toy elements may be molded from a suitable resinous plastic mateial, in which case they may be provided with a sculptured surface giving the effect of a base relief.

As is best shown in FIG. 2, the base 12 is provided with a first set or group of shallow recesses indicated respectively by alternate numerals from 36 through 54 and 55, 60, 62 and 64. These recesses are defined by Wall means shaped to fittingly receive toy elements 1434 in the prostrate position. It is to be noted that in the illustrated embodiment the recesses 60, 62 and 64 communicate with the recess 50 so that together these make up one large recess which is a part of the first set or group of recesses. Recess portions 60, 62 and 64 provide wall means which cooperate with the wall means of recess portion 50 to fittingly engage and retain toy elements 28, 30, 32 and 34 in upright position. The base 12 is also provided with a second set or group of shallow recesses which are indicated by numerals 56, 58, 66, 68 and 70, and the recesses in this latter set are defined by wall means shaped to fittingly receive the toy elements 14, 16, 18, 20 and 22 in upright position. More specifically, the recesses in this second set are shaped as narrow rectangular openings corresponding in width to the thickness of the planar toy elements. Turning for the moment to FIGS. 3 and 3a, the base 12 is seen to comprise an imperforate foundation layer 72 and an intermediate layer 74 which is cut out to provide the two sets of shallow recesses previously described. The base 12 additionally includes a top layer 76 which is printed or otherwise suitably provided with a decorative background for the scene produced by the toy elements in their upright position. By this construction of the base 12, the two sets or groups of recesses are provided with bottoms, thus developing blind recesses defined by wall mean for insuring proper positioning of the toy elements in both the prostrate and the upright positions. To provide stability in the house made up of elements 24-34, these elements are arranged for interfitted engagement. Specifically, the Wall elements 28-34 are provided with tabs 78, and the roof sections defined by toy elements 24 and 26 are fashioned with cooperatively shaped slots 80. In accordance with another feature of the invention, the recesses 56-70 which are adapted to receive the toy elements in upright position are configurated as converging lines focused at the brick house in a panoramic arrangement. Thus, when the toy elements are disposed in upright position, the planar toy elements 14-22 borrow from the three-dimensional brick house in creating an over-all illusion of three-dimensionality.

Having thus described one embodiment of the invention, it will be valuable at this juncture to specify the contemplated manner in which the toy may be used.

For shipping and handling, the toy elements 14-34 will be fitted into the recesses 36-54 and 55 in prostrate position coplanar with the base 12. This arrangement of the toy is shown in FIG. 1; and it has been found that, when the toy elements are selected to have the same thickness as the depth of the recesses 36-54, the relative fiatness of the assembled base and toy elements results in a very compact unit which is both convenient and economical to handle, ship or mail. The fact that the base and the toy elements are all planar in character contributes to this feature.

When the story-telling toy is in the hand of a child who desires to amuse himself by its reassembly, the several toy elements will be first extracted from the base 12. This may be accomplished by capturing an edge of each toy element with a fingernail, and lifting the same out of the corresponding recess; or alternatively, the base 12 may be inverted to dump or shake the toy elements out of the recesses. Thereafter, the toy elements will be defined by Wall means assembled within the second set of recesses 56-70 to create a scene representative of the story of The Three Little Pigs, as in shown in FIG, 3. In developing this assembly of the toy elements in upright position, the bottom ends thereof will be fittedly inserted in the appropriate recesses. The general familiarity with the story of The Three Little Pigs will suggest to the child an appropriate assembly of the several parts of the toy. Moreover, the simple, slot and tab style of assembly permits small children to produce a satisfying three-dimensional effect without unduly taxing their manipulative skills. It will be recognized that the story-telling toy 10 may be disassembled as easily as it was assembled; and when the toy elements 14-34 are returned to the recesses 36-54 and 55, the toy may be readily stored with reasonable assurance that the toy elements will not become separated from the base 12 and lost.

While a particular embodiment of the invention has thus far been shown and described, it should be understood that the invention is not limited thereto since many modifications may be made. Therefore and in order to enhance the understanding of the invention, one such modified form of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7. There, a story-telling toy 100 is arranged to depict the nursery rhyme about Humpty Dumpty. The toy 100 comprises a planar base 102 that is provided with a pair of recesses 104 and 106 which receive respectively toy elements 108, 110. Toy element 108 is shaped and decorated to represent a wall whereas toy element 110 is provided in the outline of an egg, being decorated to represent Humpty Dumpty. Recesses 104 and 106 receive the corresponding toy elements in prostrate position, and the base 102 is additionally provided with a narrow elongated recesses 112 which is adapted to receive the toy element 108 in rupright position as as shown in FIG. 7. The toy element 108 is fashioned with a semi-elliptical notch 114 which is adapted to receive the lower end of the toy ele ment 110 in both the prostrate and upright positions. So

that the toy may represent, not only that Humpty Dumpty sits on the wall, but also that he has his famous fall, the toy element is provided in two sections 116 and 118 which are joined by a jagged joint 120. The irregularity of the joint 110 providing a fairly stable union between the two components in addition to representing the broken condition Of Humpty Dumpty after his fall. In other respects, the toy 100 embodies the basic features and advantages of the toy 10.

The specific examples herein shown and described are to be considered as being primarily illustrative. Various changes beyondthose described will, no doubt, occur to those skilled in the art, and such changes are to be understood as forming a part of this invention insofar as they fall within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

The invention is claimed as follows:

1. A toy comprising: toy elements formed and decorated to represent parts of a scene from a childrens story; and a base member having first and second groups of recesses, each of said first group of recesses having first recess wall means shaped to fittingly receive said toy element. in a prostrate position, at least one of said first group of recesses having second recess wall means, said firt and second recess wall means of said one recess being joined and jointly shaped to fittingly engage and retain a first predetermined group of said toy elements in a predetermined upright relationship relative to each other to form a three-dimensional component of a scene for a childrens story, said second group of recesses having recess wall means dimensioned to retain a second predetermined group of said toy elements in an upright position spaced apart from the three-dimensional component of the scene from a childrens story.

2. A toy comprising: toy elements formed and decorated to represent parts of a scene from a childrens story; and a base member having first and second groups of recesses, each of said first group of recesses having first recess wall means shaped to fittingly receive said toy element in a prostrate position, at least one of said first group of recesses having second recess wall means, said first and second recess wall means of said one recess being joined and jointly shaped to fittingly engage and retain predetermined ones of said toy elements in a predetermined upright relationship relative to each other to form a three-dimensional component of a scene from a childrens story, said second group of recesses having recess wall means disposed in converging lines to retainpredetermined others of said toy elements in an upright converging relationship relative to the three-dimensional component of the scene from a childrens story.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 383,442 5/ 1888 Crandall 4622 578,029 3/1897 Russell 46-17 1,230,263 6/ 1917 Alexander. 2,023,300 12/1935 Barnett 4617 2,514,636 7/1950 Glaze 353l.4 2,529,692 11/1950 Holmes 46-22 2,659,163 11/1953 Albee. 1,862,558 6/1932 Wetzel 4616 3,191,937 6/1965 Kropinski 4616 X FOREIGN PATENTS 208,969 5 1940 Switzerland.

242,367 10/ 1946 Switzerland. 1,079,940 5/ 1954 France.

F. BARRY SHAY, Primary Examiner.

U.S. Cl. X.R. 273-157; 35-73

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4161833 *Sep 30, 1977Jul 24, 1979Carton-Craft Corp.Cutout display device
US4846750 *Nov 29, 1985Jul 11, 1989Interlego A.G.Building base for a toy building set
US4897066 *May 27, 1987Jan 30, 1990Interlego A.G.Toy activity center
US5857674 *Jan 31, 1997Jan 12, 1999Legrand; ChristianInteractive game
US20050200076 *Mar 11, 2004Sep 15, 2005Wu Yung H.Puzzle
US20130217296 *Feb 19, 2013Aug 22, 2013Addy Soentoro WidjajaModular toy system
WO2007083168A2 *Jan 23, 2007Jul 26, 2007Big Ideas Product Development LtdGame playing method and apparatus
WO2007083168A3 *Jan 23, 2007Sep 27, 2007Big Ideas Product Dev LtdGame playing method and apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/118, 273/157.00R
International ClassificationA63F9/06, A63F9/10
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/10, A63F9/1044
European ClassificationA63F9/10