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Publication numberUS3424113 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1969
Filing dateNov 4, 1964
Priority dateNov 4, 1964
Publication numberUS 3424113 A, US 3424113A, US-A-3424113, US3424113 A, US3424113A
InventorsDickmann Edwin A
Original AssigneeBemis Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for bottoming bag tubes
US 3424113 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 28, 1969 E. A. DICKMANN APPARATUS FOR BOTTOMING BAG TUBES Filed Nov. 4, 1964 I Sheet Jan. 28, 1969 E. A. DICKMANN APPARATUS FOR BOTTOMING BAG TUBES Sheet Filed Nov. 4, 1964 A0 .IWWHQF fi/O rwiml 9w 8 y 23 m 33 @HW wflmwww E. A DICKMANN APPARATUS FOR BOTTOMINQ BAG TUBES Jan. 28, 1969 Sheet Filed Nov. 4, 1964 FIG .7.

FIGS.

Jan. 28, 1969 5. A. DICKMANN 3,424,113

APPARATUS FOR BOTTOMING BAG TUBES Filed Nov. 4, 1964 Sheet 5 of 5 I25 L 7//// C |Zl I39 H9 0 Z5 I30 I -51 2 o oo o oooo9 33 United States Patent Q 17 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Bag tubes of open-mesh material are continuously fed forward one after another with the tubes extending transversely to the direction of feed. A continuous tape is folded around the ends of the tubes. The tape has printed matter thereon recurring at intervals corresponding to the spacing of the tubes being fed forward. The parts of the apparatus are arranged so that the printed matter on the tape registers with the tubes. The tape is sewn to the tube ends and it is cut between the tubes. Then individual bottomed tubes are delivered to fly sticks and rapidly thrown by the fly sticks onto spikes, the spikes impaling the openmesh bags.

The inventtion is particularly concerned with the application to bag tubes of an end closure (-a bottom end closure) comprising a length of tape folded around the end of the bag tube and secured thereto, among the several objects of the invention being the provision of apparatus for applying such closures to bag tubes which enables the use of position-printed tape (i.e., tape printed with indicia, such as brand names, labels, etc., recurring at intervals corresponding to the length of the closure) with registration of the printing on the tape in respect to each bag. The invention has been particularly developed in respect to the bottoming of bag tubes of a nonwoven openmesh plastic material, such as that sold by E. I. du Pont de Nemours Company, Inc., of Wilmington, Del., under the trade name Vexar, but it will be understood that the invention is applicable to the bottoming of various types of bag tubes including tubes made of knitted material, woven material, paper or plastic. A further object of this invention, as developed for the bottoming of the stated type of open-mesh tube, is the provision of apparatus for involving stitching of the tape to the tubes and treatment of the stitching in such manner as strongly to resist tearing away of the tape from the tube. It will be understood, however, that modes of securing the tape to the tubes other than stitching are contemplated within the scope of the invention. Another object of the invention is the provision of apparatus such as described with novel and im-' proved means for accumulating completed bags. Other objects and features will be in part apparent and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the constructions hereinafter described, the scope of the invention being indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which one of various possible embodiments of the invention is illustrated,

FIG. 1 is a side elevation of an apparatus constructed in accordance with this invention, broken away in part to reduce the length of the view;

FIG. 2 is a plan of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a semidiagrammatic plan view, on a larger scale than FIG. 2, and broken away in part like FIG. 2 to reduce the length of the view, showing the mode of application of the end closures to the bag tubes;

FIG. 4 is a view showing a position-printed tape such as may be used;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged longitudinal section taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 2;

3,424,113 Patented Jan. 28, 1969 FIGS. 6, 7 and 8 are enlarged vertical transverse sections taken on lines 6-6, 7-7 and 8-8, respectively, of FIG. 2;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragment of FIG. 1, with parts broken away and shown in section, showing certain feed rolls and a solvent applicator of the apparatus;

FIG. 10 is a semidiagrammatic view showing a cutter for the tape and stitching, and electrical components associated therewith; and

FIG. 11 is a view illustrating a special thread used in stitching the tape to the tubes.

Corresponding reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring first more particularly to FIGS. 3 and 5 of the drawings, a conveyor generally designated 1 is shown as feeding forward (from left to right) a series of elongate bag tubes 3 one after another, with the tubes extending transversely with respect to the direction of feed and spaced at equal intervals longitudinally with respect to the direction of feed. The tubes are delivered therefrom one after another to conveyor 1 by a delivery conveyor 5 (see FIGS. 1 and 2). Tubes 3 may be gusseted Vexar tubes, or other types of tubes. In the case of Vexar tubes, the tubes are segmented from continuous Vexar tube stock in an apparatus (not shown) for this purpose and delivered by said apparatus to conveyor 5 for delivery to conveyor 1. The tubes 3 are fed forward one after another by conveyor 1 with the ends thereof which are to be closed in alignment at one side of the conveyor (its right-hand side as viewed facing forward).

As the bag tubes 3 are advanced, a continuous length of tape 7 for closing one end of the tubes is folded around the right-had ends of the advancing tubes by a folder 9. After the tape has been folded around the ends of the tubes, the tape and the tubes pass through a sewing machine 11 (see FIG. 2) for stitching the tape to the tubes. The needle of the sewing machine is indicated at 13 in FIG. 3. The line of stitching resulting from passage of the tape and the tubes through the sewing machines is indicated at 15 in FIG. 3. A pair of draw rolls 17 and 19 (see particularly FIGS. 1, 3 and 9) engages the folded tape at a point past the sewing machine. These nolls act positively to feed the tape forward.

The sewing machine used at 11 is a conventional sewing machine, such as a Singer No. 300W205' machine. This employs a needle thread and a looper thread. In accordance with this invention, the looper thread used for stitching the tape to the tubes is a blend of two different fibers, tone of which is soluble in a selected solvent to form an adhesive, the other of which is insoluble in that solvent. For example, the looper thread may comprise a blend of 50% acetate rayon and 50% viscose rayon, acetate rayon being soluble in acetone to form an adhesive, viscose rayon being insoluble in acetone. This is depicted in FIG. 11, Where the acetate rayon fibers are represented at 21s and the viscose rayon fibers at 2112. The needle thread may be a conventional cotton thread.

As the tape exits from the draw rolls 17 and 19, solvent is applied to the stitching 15 (more particularly to the looper thread, which is on the bottom) by a solvent applicator 23. This dissolves or at least partially dissolves the soluble fiber of the looper thread, forming an adhesive for adhering the looper thread to the needle thread to prevent t aveling of the stitching and firmly to secure the folded tape to the tubes. Tape 7 and the stitching 15 are then severed between adjacent bag tubes 3 by a cutter 25 and bundled. It will be understood that each bag 3a i ultimately filled through its remaining open end and then suitably closed by the packer.

More particularly, the conveyor 1 comprises a stationary table top 33, which may be fabricated of sheet metal, supported on legs 35. A platform 37 is shown positioned beneath and to one side of the table top 33 for supporting various elements of the apparatus. The table tOp is formed with two parallel longitudinally extending slots 39. Two endless chains 41 each have an upper reach located immediately beneath the slots 39. Chains 41 are trained around sprockets 43 on a transverse horizontal shaft 45 at the forward end of the conveyor. Chains 41 are also trained around sprockets 47 on a shaft 49 at the rear end of the conveyor. Shafts 45 and 49 are supported between table 33 and platform 37. Lugs 50 project out from the chains through the slots 39 and carry a plurality of parallel bars 51 for pushing the bag tubes along the table. Bars 51 extend transversely across the table top and slide along the table top. Bars 51 are equally spaced a distance somewhat greater than the width of the bag tubes. A will be seen in FIGS. 3 and 5, with the conveyor moving to the right, the bars 51 engage the rearward edge of each bag tube (except the bag tube at the extreme rear of FIG. 3 which has just been delivered to the conveyor) and push them forward 'along the table top 33 with spaces between the tubes.

The conveyor may be of the same or similar construction to conveyor 1. Conveyor 5 is driven directly from conveyor 1 by a chain 53 which is trained around a sprocket 55 on shaft 49 of conveyor 1 and around another sprocket (not shown) on a shaft 57 (FIG. 2) located at the forward end of the conveyor 5.

As bag tubes 3 leave conveyor 5 they are discharged onto an inclined chute 59 and slide onto the table 33. The

tubes are brought into correct position on table 33 between bars 51 of conveyor 1 by jets of air from air nozzles 61 and 63 as shown in FIG. 3. Nozzle 61 directs air against each of the tubes 3 (which are of relatively light weight) as they are delivered to conveyor 1, blowing them forward (to the right as shown in FIG. 3) on the conveyor 1. Thus, each tube as it is delivered to conveyor 1 is first blown against the trailing face of the bar 51 immediately to the right of chute 59 (as shown for the tube 3 at the extreme left in FIG. 3). This prevents the tube 3 from resting on top of one of the bars 51. As the conveyor 1 moves forward, the bag tubes 3 move out of the range of the air issuing from nozzle 61 and are thereafter pushed forwardly by the leading faces of bars 51 as they travel along the top of table 33. Nozzle 63 directs a jet of air against the tubes 3 to blow them laterally across the table top 33 (lengthwise of the tube) toward the right side edge of the table top 33 (shown at the bottom in FIGS. 1 and 3) against a stop 64 and into the folded tape 7. The jets of air issuing from nozzles 61 and 63 thus accurately locate the bag tubes 3 on convey-or 1 for receiving tape 7.

As shown in FIG. 4, tape 7 has prepunched sprocket holes 65 and 65a spaced at equal intervals along its longitudinal center line. As illustrated, the spacing between the holes corresponds to one-half the spacing of bars 51. The tape is position-printed on its face which comes on the outside when the tape is folded on its longitudinal center line, having a series of recurrent groups of printing such as indicated at 67 on one side of its longitudinal center line and a similar but inverted series of recurrent groups of printing 67a on the other side of its longitudinal center line. As herein shown for illustration, each group comprises the lessers A, B and C. The groups recur at intervals corresponding to twice the spacing of the holes in the tape, hence recur at intervals corresponding to the spacing of bars 51 (i.e., the spacing of tubes 3 being conveyed forward by conveyor 1). The holes designated 65 in FIG. 4 are centered in respect to the indicia or printing 67, and those designated 65a alternate with holes 65. The groups in the two series are inverted relative to one another so that when tape 7 is folded around the tube ends the printing will be upright on both sides of the tubes. It will be understood that the printing in one series could be different from the other, e.g., letters A, B, C for each group in one series and letters D, E, F for each group in the other series.

Tape 7 is supplied in a roll as shown at 69 in FIG. 2 and is supported in horizontal position by a roll holder 71 with the holes in the tape generally at the level of the table top 33. Holder 71 is preferably braked in suitable manner to retard unwinding of the tape. As tape 7 is unwound from the roll 69' it passes around a guide roller 73. A spring-biased arm 75 pivoted on the axis of roller 73 at the bottom of roller 33 has an upwardly projecting pin 77 at its outer end which engages the tape 7 to tension it and hold it taut as it unwinds. Tape 7 then passes through a guide 79 and thence around a sprocket wheel 83 having a plurality of radially extending sprocket pins 85 which project through the holes 65 in the tape 7 as it travels around the wheel. Eight such pins 85 are shown in FIG. 2, spaced at 45 intervals. The spacing of pins 85 around the periphery of the wheel corresponds to one-half of the spacing of conveyor bars 51, hence to one-half of the spacing of the tubes being fed forward by the bars. Sprocket wheel 83 is positively driven in tape-forwarding direction at a speed corresponding to the speed at which the tubes are fed forward. The drive for wheel 83 is indicated in FIGS. 1 and 2 as comprising a chain and sprocket drive 87 taken off the rear conveyor sprocket shaft 49 and a bevel gear drive 88. Sprocket wheel 83 is phased with conveyor 1 for registration of the printed matter on the tape being fed forward by the sprocket wheel with the tubes being fed forward by the conveyor. This registration is positive, in view of positive interengagement of the tape with the sprocket wheel via entry of pins 85 in the holes in the tape, and the tensioning of the reach of the tape from the sprocket wheel to the draw rolls 17 and 19.

Tape 7 next enters the folder 9 at the rearward end of convyor 1. This folder 9, as shown in FIGS. 1, 2, 6 and 7, comprises an elongate channel member extending longitudinally along and straddling the edge of the table top 33, being mounted on a support 89 on platform 37. The channel member 9 tapers from a relatively wide generally U-shape cross section at its entrance end 91 (see FIG. 6) to a relatively narrow generally V-shape cross section at its exit end 93 (see FIG. 7) so that as the tape is pulled therethrough it is folded in half on its longitudinal center line to straddle the adjacent ends of the bag tubes 3 (and the edge of the table top). As the folded tape exits from the folder, its lower half lies under the edge of the table top 33. For passage of the lower half of the tape out from under the edge of the table top, the latter has a cut-out at 95, and as the tape and tube ends pass this cut-out, the lower half of the folded tape comes against the bottom face of the bag tubes for stitchmg of both halves of the folded tape to the tubes. A guide 96 is provided at this cut-out for the folded tape (see FIG. 8).

A main drive shaft 97 for the conveyor 1, the conveyor 5 and the sewing machine 13 extends transversely of the apparatus below platform 37. This drives the sewing machine via a belt and pulley drive 99. It drives the conveyor 1 via a speed-reducing drive 101 including a worm 103 driven via bevel gearing 105 in the sewing machine, meshmg with a gear 107 on a shaft 109, with a chain and sprocket drive 111 from shaft 109 to shaft 45 of the conveyor 1. As previously mentioned, sprocket wheel 83 1S driven from conveyor 1 via drives 87 and 88, and conveyor 5 is driven from conveyor 1 via chain 53. Thus, conveyors 5 and 1, the sewing machine and sprocket wheel 83 are all driven in synchronism from shaft 97, which is in turn driven from a suitable power source as indicated at 113 in FIG. 2. The tube ends with the tape 7 folded therearound travel over the forward end 115 of the bed of the sewing machine, which is located at the cut-out 95 of the table top 33.

Power source 113 also drives the aforementioned apparatus for segmenting the tubes so that this apparatus, conveyor 5, conveyor 1 and other units driven by power source 113 all operate in phase at various speeds for full automatic continuous operation.

Roll 19 of the pair of draw rolls 17 and 19 is positively driven in tape-forwarding direction by being mounted on shaft 109. The diameter of rolls 17 and 19 is such that the peripheral speed of these rolls is slightly in excess of the peripheral speed of the sprocket wheel 83 so that the reach of the tape extending from the sprocket wheel through the folder and through the sewing machine is tensioned. Thus, rolls 17 and 19 tend to draw the tape through the sewing machine under some tension. Roll 17 is supported in a clevis 119 on a rod 121. Arms 123 and 125 project from the sewing machine housing and have axially aligned holes at their outer ends in which the rod 121 is vertically slidable. A coil compression spring 127 surrounding rod 121 between the arms 123 and 125- reacts from arm 12.3 against a collar 129 attached to rod 121, biasing the rod and the roll 17 downwardly toward the drive roll 19. Thus, the tape 7 and the ends of the bag tubes 3 are firmly gripped between the rolls 17 and 19. The fold at the center of tape 7 is creased or flattened as it passes between rolls 17 and 19. Draw rolls 17 and 19 constitute means for pulling tape 7 from the roll 69 through the sewing machine 13. Once tape 7 is stitched to the tubes 3, rolls 17 and 19 feed them to the solvent applicator 23. An opening 130 is provided in table top 33 for the rolls 17 and 19.

The solvent applicator 23 comprises a reservoir 131 for holding a supply of solvent (such as acetone) received in an opening 132 in the table top 33. A perforated hollow applicator drum 133 is rotatable in the reservoir, having a shaft 135. The drum dips down into solvent in the reservoir and picks up solvent on its surface and in its perforations. The lower face of the folded tape 7 passes over the top of the drum, and the solvent is thereby applied to the looper thread of the stitching 15. The tape 7 is pressed down on the top of the drum by a leaf spring 139 fastened at one end to arm 125. Solvent is supplied to reservoir 131 by gravity from a bottle 141 (FIGS. 1 and 2) through a tube 143.

The bag tubes 3 with tape 7 folded around and stitched to their ends issuing from the solvent applicator 23 pass through the cutter 25 for severing of the tape and the stitching 15 between successive bag tubes. Cutter 25 is a conventional double-acting shear type cutter, shown in FIG. as basically comprising a cutting 'blade 145 pivoted at 146 and having upper and lower cutting edges 145a and 1451; working an conjunction with a fixed shear block 147 having a throat 148 for passage of the tape and tube ends. Blade 145 has arms 149 act-uable by two solenoids 150 and 151, the plungers of the latter being shown as having pin and slot connections 152 to the arms. The arrangement is such that when solenoid 150 is energized, blade 145 is swung up to make a cut on its upstroke, and when solenoid 151 is energized, blade 145 is swung down to make a cut on its downstroke.

The solenoids 150 and 151 are connected in a circuit with a rotary switch 153 which is actuated by the sprocket wheel 83 in timed relation to the travel of the tape to effect actuation of the blade 145 for cutting tape 7 and stitching between successive bag tubes. Switch 153 is of a conventional type having a rotary switch-actuating shaft 154. On this shaft are four radial arms 155 spaced at 90 intervals. These arms are engageable by pins 156 extending upward from sprocket wheel 83, four such pins being shown spaced at 90 intervals, and in the radial planes of alternate sprocket pins 85. The arrangement is such that, as sprocket wheel 83 rotates (clockwise as viewed in FIG. 2), pins 156 engage arms 155 to effect rotation of the switch-actuating shaft 154 in steps. The switch 153 includes contacts (not shown) which are made and broken on rotation of shaft 154 in such manner as to effect alternate action of solenoids and 151 on successive 90 steps of the shaft, with actuation of the solenoids timed to occur at the instant that a hole 65a reaches the cutting plane of the blade 145.

Switch 153 is mounted on the bottom of a plate 159 pivoted for angular adjustment on top of a post 161 extending up from platform 37, for adjustment of the position of the switch relative to the sprocket wheel 83. Adjustment of the angular position of plate 159 is by means of a pair of screws 163 threaded in the plate engaging a stop 165 carried by the post 161 reaching up through a hole 167 in the plate.

The table top 33 has a curved forward end 171, following the arc of the chains 41 around sprockets 43-, this curved end being slotted in continuation of slots 39. Each bag 3a (severed by cutter 25 from the string of tubes 3 interconnected by tape 7 and stitching 15) is pushed forward around this forward end of the table top, and slides down an inclined chute 173 in front of the fly sticks 29. Hold-down straps for the bags are indicated at 175. The fly sticks 29 are attached at their lower ends to a shaft 177 mounted below and forward of the forward end of conveyor 1 on a subframe 178. The fly sticks 29 move with the shaft 177 through an arcuate path from their FIG. 1 solid line position back against chute 173 toward the accumulator 31 to the FIG. 1 dotted-line position, thereby throwing bags 3a forward onto the accumulator 31.

Movement of the shaft 177 and the fly sticks 29 thereon is synchronized with operation of conveyor 1. The mechanism for achieving this synchronous movement is best illustrated in FIG. 1, where it is shown as including an arm 179 on one end of the shaft 177. A tension spring 181 connected between the end of arm 179 and a suitable stationary frame part diagrammatically shown at 183 biases the arm 179 in a counterclockwise direction for spring-returning the fly sticks 29 to their retracted position shown in solid lines in FIG. 1.

Pivotally attached to arm 179 is a rod 185 which adjustably mounts a sleeve 187. In sleeve 187 there is an elongate slot 189. A connecting rod 191 has one end slidable in the sleeve 187 and the other end connected to a crank disk 193 on conveyor shaft 45. The end of connecting rod 191 in the sleeve 187 carries a pin which projects through slot 189 providing a lost motion connection between rods 191 and 185. As the connecting rod 191 is moved up from its FIG. 1 position by rotation of disk 193 on shaft 45 through the first half of a revolution, pin 195 eventually engages the upper end of the slot 189 to pull arm 179 upwardly against the return bias of spring 181. Arm 179 in turn rotates the shaft 177 and the fly sticks 29 to their FIG. 1 dotted-line position. As crank disk 193 completes a revolution, the pin 195 moves further into the sleeve 187 and disengages itself from the upper end of slot 189, thereby releasing arm 179 to permit movement of fly sticks 29 back to their re tracted position by the biasing action of spring 181. Since pin 195 has a lost motion connection with the upper end of slot 189, fly sticks 29 have a dwell interval during which they are held in their FIG. 1 solid-line retracted position by spring 181. The bags are delivered to the fly sticks during such dwell intervals. In this manner each bag is individually thrown forward to the accumulator 31.

The accumulator 31 comprises a shaft 197 spaced forward of subframe 178 from shaft 177. Mounted on shaft 197 are spaced hubs 199 which carry radially extending spikes 201 equally spaced around the hubs (five such spikes being shown on each hub). Each spike of one hub is aligned and paired with a spike on the other hub in a set. Shaft 197 is rotatable in steps corresponding to the number of pairs or sets of spikes to bring each set into the loading or impaling position indicated at A in FIG. 1 for having impaled thereon bags thrown forward by the fly sticks 29. With five pairs of spikes as shown, the shaft 197 is rotatable in 72 steps. When a predetermined number of bags have been impaled on a pair of spikes at position A, the shaft is indexed 72 in clockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 1 to bring this pair to unloading position B, and to bring the next trailing pair of spikes to loading position A. The bags are then removed from the spikes at position B.

Means for indexing the shaft 197 is shown to comprise an electric motor 203 coupled by a drive 205 to the driving member of an electric clutch 207. The driven member of the clutch is connected by a drive 209 to the shaft 197. Motor 203 is continuously driven and clutch 207 is intermittently energized to index shaft 197 through a 72 indexing step (in the case of five sets of spikes 201 on the shaft) via a counter-controlled switch 211 (see FIG. 2). The counter of this switch is electrically pulsed once for each tube 3 fed forward (and once for each bag or bottomed tube 30 delivered) via a switch 212 actuated by a cam 213 on shaft 49. The electrical interconnections between the switch 212 and the counter 211 and between the counter and the electric clutch are indicated at 215 and 217. The arrangement is such that the counter of switch 211 is pulsed once each revolution of shaft 49, corresponding to delivery of a bag 3a, and when a predetermined count is reached (for example, fifty bags), switch 211 closes to energize clutch 207 to index shaft 197 through 72. Switch 211 then opens, and its counter is reset to zero to begin the next count. Indexing of the shaft 197 occurs during an interval between throwing forward of two successive bags by the fly sticks.

Operation of the above-described apparatus for bottoming the tubes 3, using the position-printed perforated tape 7 is as follows:

The conveyor 1, comprising endless chains 41 and crossbars 51, is continuously driven from shaft 97 via gearing 105, and drive 101. The sewing machine 11 is continuously driven synchronously with conveyor 1 from shaft 97. Conveyor 5 is continuously driven synchronously with conveyor 1 via drive 53. Draw roll 19 (on shaft 109) is continuously driven, its peripheral speed being greater than the speed of conveyor 1. Sprocket 83 is continuously driven in synchronism with the conveyor 1 via drive 87 and gearing 88.

Conveyor 5 delivers bag tubes 3 one after another to the conveyor 1. The bag tubes are positioned between the bars 51 of conveyor 1 and with their ends to be bottomed, viz. their right-hand ends as viewed facing forward of conveyor 1, substantially in alignment at the right side of the table top 33, by air issuing from the nozzles 61 and 63. The tubes are fed forward in succession one after another flatwise along the table top 33 by bars 51, with the tubes extending transversely to the direction of feed and spaced apart at equal intervals in the direction of feed corresponding to the difference between the Width of the tubes and the spacing of bars 51.

As the tubes 3 are fed forward along the table top 33, tape 7 is pulled from the roll 69 by sprocket wheel 83, and the length of tape extending from the sprocket wheel to the draw rolls 17 and 19 is tensioned by reason of the overspeed of the rolls 17 and 19. The tape is continuously fed forward from the sprocket wheel at a speed corresponding to the speed of the tubes 3, and, in passing through the folder 9, the tape is folded around the righthand ends of the tubes (see FIGS. 68). The tubes with tape folded around their ends then pass through the sewing machine 11 for stitching the tape to the tubes as indicated at 15 in FIG. 3. As the tape 7 (now folded around and stitched to the ends of the tubes) exits from rolls 17 and 19, it passes over the solvent applicator drum 133 for application of solvent to the looper thread 21 of the stitching. The soluble fiber 21s of the looper thread is thereby dissolved or partially dissolved in the solvent and, upon evaporation of the Solvent (which occurs rapidly by reason of use of a fast-evaporating solvent such as acetone), the looper thread is adhered to the needle thread to prevent raveling of the stitching and firmly to secue the folded tape to the tubes.

As noted above, the tape is fed forward at a speed corresponding to the speed of tubes 3 fed forward by bars 51 of conveyor 1. This occurs because the speed of the tape is positively controlled by the sprocket wheel 83, which is driven in synchronism with conveyor 1. Sprocket wheel 83 also functions positively to maintain the tape in register or plase with the tubes 3 fed forward by the conveyor so that the tape is folded around the ends of the tubes with holes in the tape (and hence groups 67 of printed matter) centered with respect to the tubes and with holes 65a midway between the tubes. Sprocket wheel 83 further functions to effect operation of cutter 25 in timed relation to the feed of the tape 7 and tubes 3, pins 156 on wheel 83 actuating switch 153 to effect alternate actuation of the blade-operating solenoids and 151 on successive quarter-revolutions of the wheel 83, with the actuation of the solenoids timed to occur at the instant that a hole 65a reaches the cutting plane of the blade 145. The latter thus acts to cut the tape 7 and stitching 15 midway between the tubes (i.e., at hole 65 a) as they are fed forward past the solvent applicator 23 and approach the forward end of conveyor 1.

Each successive bag 3n (comprising a tube 3 bottom d at its right end by a length of tape 7 folded around and stitched thereto), segmented from the trailing string of tubes 3 interconnected by tape 7 and stitching 15, upon reaching the forward end of the conveyor 1, slides down the chute 173 at the forward end of conveyor 1 to a position such as represented in phantom in FIG. 1 in front of the retracted fly sticks 29. The latter have feet 219 upon which the lower edge of the bag rests. Immediately upon delivery of a bag 3a to the fly sticks, the latter are rapidly swung forward via upward movement of rod 191 by crank disk 193 to swing arm 179 and fly stick shaft 177 clockwise. The fly sticks thereupon throw the bag forward and impale it on the set of spikes 201 of the accumulator 31 in the loading position A. Since the bags are made of open-mesh material, they readily slide down the spikes and accumulate on the spikes in a stack as indicated as S in FIG. 1. The fly sticks are then quickly returned to their retracted position by the action of return spring 181 to be ready to receive the next completed bag delivered by conveyor 1.

A bag is completed and delivered to the fly sticks 29 on each revolution of shaft 49 of the conveyor 1. Cam 213 on this shaft 49 actuates switch 212 once each revolution of shaft 49, hence once for each bag delivered, and transmits a pulse of current to the counter-controlled switch 211 for each bag delivered. When a predetermined count is reached (fifty, for example) switch 211 is actuated to energize clutch 207 to effect indexing of accumulator 31 to move the set of spikes 201 at loading position A having fifty bags (or other predetermined count of bags) impaled thereon to position B for unloading, and to move the set of spikes which trailed position A into position A to receive the next fifty bags (or other predetermined count of bags). Cam 213 is phased to effect this indexing during an interval between the throwing forward of the last bag of the predetermined count of bags and the next bag.

While as above described the tape is stitched to the tubes, it is within the scope of this invention to secure the tape to the tubes otherwise than by stitching. For example, the tape may be adhered to the tubes by a hot melt adhesive, applied by means of an applicator substituted for the sewing machine, or by using a tape having a heat-scalable coating on that face of the tape which is on the inside when the tape is folded, and activated by a heating means substituted for the sewing machine. The coating may be ultransonically activated.

In the case of operations on solid-wall bags (e.g., paper or plastic bags) instead of open-mesh bags, accumulator 31 is not used (being moved off to one side).

In view of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

As various changes could be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope of the in vention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for bottoming bag tubes comprising a table, an endless chain conveyor carrying means for pushing bag tubes forward one after another along the table with the tubes extending transversely of the table, spaced apart at equal intervals in the direction of feed, with substantial space between the tubes, and with their ends to be bottomed substantially in alignment at one side of the table, a folder at said side of the table for folding a tape around said ends of the tubes, means at said side of the table forward of the folder for securing the tape folded around said ends of the tubes to the tubes, a pair of rolls forward of said securing means at said side of the table for pulling the tape, a cutter forward of said rolls at said side of the table for cutting the tape between the tubes, a holder for a roll of tape having printed matter thereon recurring at intervals corresponding to the spacing of the tubes being fed forward along the table, the tape having holes spaced at intervals along its length, a sprocket wheel around which the tape passes between the roll holder and the folder having pins receivable in the holes in the tape for effecting registration of the printed matter on the tape with the tubes, and means for continuously driving the conveyor, the securing means and the sprocket wheel in synchronism and for continuously driving said rolls at a peripheral speed slightly in excess of the peripheral speed of the sprocket wheel to maintain the portion of the tape extending from the sprocket wheel through the folder and the securing means under tension.

2. Apparatus as set forth in claim 1 wherein said securing means comprises a sewing machine for stitching the tape folded around said ends of the tubes to the tubes, the cutting means acting to cut the stitching as well as the tape between tubes.

3. Apparatus as set forth in claim 2 wherein the thread used in stitching the tape to the tubes includes a soluble, fiber, and wherein means is provided between the rolls and the cutter for applying a solvent for said fiber to the stitching.

4. Apparatus for bottoming bag tubes, such as tubes of open-mesh plastic material, comprising means for feeding forward a succession of tubes flatwise one after another with the tubes extending transversely to the direction of feed, spaced apart in the direction of feed, and with their ends to be bottomed substantially in alignment at one side of said feeding means, means for folding a continuous tape around said ends of the tubes as they are fed forward, a sewing machine for stitiching the tape folded around said ends of the tubes to the tubes utilizing a thread including a soluble fiber, means for cutting the tape between tubes as they are fed forward, and means between the sewing machine and cutting means for applying a solvent for said fiber to the stitching issuing from the sewing machine.

5. Apparatus as set forth in claim 4 wherein the sewing stitches the tape to the tubes with a needle thread and a looper thread, and wherein the looper thread includes the soluble fiber, said solvent applying means being located to apply the solvent to the looper thread.

6. In a bag apparatus wherein bags of open-mesh material are formed and delivered one after another, means for stacking the bags comprising a carrier carrying a plurality of spike means successively movable into a loading position, and means for receiving bags from said apparatus and impaling them one after another on the spike means in loading position, said carrier being movable to move the latter spike means out of loading position after a number of bags have been impaled thereon and to move another spike means into loading position, said impaling means comprising means for throwing each bag received thereby onto the spike means which is in loading position, said throwing means comprising fly sticks mounted for swinging movement away from and back to a retracted position, said fly sticks being spaced from said spike means in both positions and receiving a bag when in retracted position, and means for rapidly swinging the fly sticks forward away from retracted position toward the spike means which is in loading position to throw the bag thereon and then swinging the fly sticks back to retracted position to receive the next bag.

7. In a bag apparatus as set forth in claim 6, means responsive to delivery of a predetermined number of bags for moving the carrier to move the spike means which was in loading position out of loading position and to move another spike means into loading position.

8. In a bag apparatus wherein bags of open-mesh material are formed and delivered one after another, means for collecting and bearing off the bags comprising a shaft, a plurality of sets of spikes extending generally radially outward from the shaft spaced at equal intervals around the shaft, means for indexing the shaft to bring successive sets of spikes into a loading position, fly sticks mounted for swinging movement away from and back to a retracted position, said fly sticks when in retracted position receiving a bag delivered by said apparatus, means for rapidly swinging the fly sticks forward away from retracted position toward the set of spikes which is in loading position to throw the bag thereon and then swinging the fly sticks back. to retracted position to receive the next bag, said fly sticks and spikes being spaced apart in both positions of said fly sticks, and means responsive to delivery of a predetermined number of bags for actuating said indexing means during the interval between impalement of the last of said number of bags and the next bag.

9. Apparatus for bottoming bag tubes comprising means for feeding forward a succession of tubes flatwise one after another with the tubes extending transversely to the direction of feed, spaced apart at equal intervals in the direction of feed, and with their ends to be bottomed substantially in alignment at one side of said feeding means, a holder for a roll of tape having printed matter thereon recurring at intervals cor-responding to the spacing of the tubes being fed forward, and having holes spaced at equal intervals along its length, means for folding the tape unwinding from the roll around said ends of the tubes as they are fed forward, a sprocket wheel around which the tape passes between the roll holder and the folding means having pins receivable in the holes in the tape for effecting registration of the printed matter on the tape with the tubes, means for driving said wheel in synchronism and in phase with said tube feeding means, means for securing the tape folded around said ends of the tubes to the tubes, means operable in timed relation to the feeding means for cutting the tape between tubes as they are fed forward by said feeding means past said securing means, said apparatus being particularly for bottoming bag tubes of open-mesh material and further comprising means for stacking the bottomed tubes delivered by the feeding means, said stacking means comprising spikes on which said bottomed tubes may be impaled, and fly sticks for throwing the bottomed tubes on the spikes.

10. Apparatus as set forth in claim 9 wherein a plurality of sets of spikes are provided successively movable into a loading position, and wherein means is provided for moving each set out of loading position and for moving another set into impaling position in response to accumulation of a predetermined number of bottomed tubes on the set in loading position.

11. Apparatus for bottoming bag tubes comprising means for feeding forward a succession of tubes fiatwise one after another with the tubes extending transversely to the direction of feed, spaced apart at equal intervals in the direction of feed, and with their ends to be bottomed substantially in alignment at one side of said feeding means, means for folding a continuous tape around said ends of the tubes as they are fed forward, said tape having printed matter thereon recurring at intervals corresponding to the spacing of the tubes being fed forward, means for effecting registration of the printed matter on the tape with the tubes, means for securing the tape folded around said ends of the tubes to the tubes, means operable in timed relation to the feeding means for cutting the tape between tubes as they are fed forward by said feeding means past said securing means, said apparatus being particularly for bottoming bag tubes of open-mesh material and further comprising means for stacking the bottomed tubes delivered by the feeding means, said stacking means comprising spikes on which said bottomed tubes may be impaled, and fly sticks for throwing the bottomed tubes on the spikes.

12. Apparatus as set forth in claim 11 wherein a plurality of sets of spikes are provided successively movable into a loading position, and wherein means is provided for moving each set out of loading position and for moving another set into impaling position in response to accumulation of a predetermined number of bottomed tubes on the set in loading position.

13. Apparatus for bottoming bag tubes comprising a support, means on said support for continuously feeding forward a succession of tubes fiatwise one after another with the tubes extending transversely to the direction of feed, spaced apart at equal intervals in the direction of feed, with substantial space between the tubes, and with their ends to be bottomed substantially in alignment at one side of said feeding means, means for folding a continuous tape around said ends of the tubes as they are fed forward, said tape having printed matter thereon recurring at intervals corresponding to the spacing of the tubes being fed forward, means for effecting registration of the :printed matter on the tape with the tubes, means on said support operable continuously with said feeding means for securing the tape folded around said ends of the tubes to the tubes as the tubes are continuously fed forward by said feeding means, and means on said support operable in timed relation to the feeding means for cutting the tape between tubes as they are continuously fed forward by said feeding means past said securing means, said means for effecting registration of the printed matter on the tape with the tubes comprising means in positive engagement with the tape for continuously feeding the tape toward the tubes at the speed at which they are fed forward with the printed matter on the tape in phase with the tubes, and means between the securing means and cutter for tensioning the portion of tape extending from said tape feeding means to said tensioning means.

14. Apparatus for bottoming bag tubes comprising a support, means on said support for continuously feeding forward a succession of tubes fiatwise one after another with the tubes extending transversely to the direction of feed, spaced apart at equal intervals in the direction of feed, with substantial space between the tubes, and with their ends to be bottomed substantially in alignment at one side of said feeding means, means for folding a continuous tape around said ends of the tubes as they are fed forward, said tape having printed matter thereon recurring at intervals corresponding to the spacing of the tubes being fed forward, means for effecting registration of the printed matter on the tape with the tube, means on said support operable continuously with said feeding means for securing the tape folded around said ends of the tubes to the tubes as the tubes are continuously fed forward by said feeding means, and means on said support operable in timed relation to the feeding means for cutting the tape between tubes as they are continuously fed forward by said feeding means past said securing means, said means for effecting registration of the printed matter on the tape with the tubes comprising means in positive engagement with the tape for continuously feeding the tape toward the tubes at the speed at which they are fed forward with the printed matter on the tape in phase with the tubes, said securing means comprising a sewing machine for stitching the tape folded around'said ends of the tubes to the tubes, the cutting means acting to cut the stitching as well as the tape between tubes, the thread used in stitching the tape to the tubes including a soluble fiber, and means on said support for applying a solvent for said fiber to the stitching issuing from the sewing machine.

15. Apparatus for bottoming bag tubes comprising means for continuously feeding forward a succession of tubes fiatwise one after another with the tubes extending transversely to the direction of feed, spaced apart at equal intervals in the direction of feed, with substantial space between the tubes, and with their ends to be bottomed substantially in alignment at one side of said feeding means, a holder for a roll of tape having printed matter therein recurring at intervals corresponding to the spacing of the tubes being fed forward, and having holes spaced at equal intervals along its length, means for folding the tape unwinding from the roll around said ends of the tubes as they are fed forward, a sprocket wheel around which the tape passes between the roll holder and the folding means having pins receivable in the holes in the tape for effecting registration of the printed matter on the tape with the tubes, means for continuously driving said wheel in synchronism and in phase with said tube feeding means, means operable continuously with said feeding means for securing the tape folded around said ends of the tubes to the tubes as the tubes are continuously fed forward by said feeding means, means operable in timed relation to the feding means for cutting the tape between tubes as they are continuously fed forward by said feeding means past said securing means, and means controlled by the sprocket wheel for actuating the cutting means.

16. Apparatus for bottoming bag tubes comprising means for continuously feeding forward a succession of tubes fiatwise one after another with the tubes extending transversely to the direction of feed, spaced apart at equal intervals in the direction of feed, with substantial space between the tubes, and with their ends to be bottomed substantially in alignment at one side of said feeding means, a holder for a roll of tape having printed matter thereon recurring at intervals corresponding to the spacing of the tubes being fed forward, and having holes spaced at equal intervals along its length, means for folding the tape unwinding from the roll around said ends of the tubes as they are fed forward, a sprocket wheel around which the tape passes between the roll holder and the folding means having pins receivable in the holes in the tape for effecting registration of the printed matter on the tape with the tubes, means for continuously driving said wheel in synchronism and in phase with said tube feeding means, means operable continuously with said feeding means for securing the tape folded around said ends of the tubes to the tubes as the tubes are continuously fed forward by said feeding means, means operable in timed relation to the feeding means for cutting the tape between tubes as they are continuously fed forward by said feeding means past said securing means, said securing means comprising a sewing machine for stitching the tape folded around said ends of the tubes to the tubes, the cutting means acting to cut the stitching as well as the tape between tubes, the sewing machine stitching the tape and the tube with a needle thread and a looper thread, at least one of said threads including a soluble fiber, and means between said sewing machine and cutting means for applying a solvent for said first fiber to said one thread.

13 14 17. Apparatus as set forth in claim 16 wherein the 3,097,618 7/1963 Davis 112-262 X looper thread includes the soluble fiber, and said solvent 3,125,916 3/ 1964 Hayes et a1 271-72 X applying means is located to apply the solvent to the 2,435,543 2/ 1948 Johnson et al 28-76 looper thread. 2,714,758 8/1955 Woodson 28-76 2,850,993 9/1958 Palm 112-11 References Cited 3,156,206 11/1958 Hall et a1. 112-10 X UNITED STATES PATENTS FOREIGN PATENTS 1,857,949 5/1932 Freydberg 112-11 X 617 039 1/1949 Great i i 1,901,062 3/1933 Sharkey 93 93.3 1 923 322 1933 Mendel 15 305 X 10 TRAVIS S. MCGEHEE, Primary Examiner. 2,558,503 6/1951 g- NEIL ABRAMS, Assistant Examiner. 2,740,244 4/1956 Belli 53-137 Us Cl XR 2,874,659 2/1959 Kehrer 271-70 X 2,962,082 11/1960 Lenney .156-93 112-130, 262; 271-69; 214-6; 28-76; 93-8, 93; 2,994,631 8/1961 O ttinger 112-262X 15 156-93, 305

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3613529 *Feb 24, 1970Oct 19, 1971Windmoeller & HoelscherApparatus for automatically charging a stack magazine of a bag-making machine with tube section stacks
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Classifications
U.S. Classification112/10, 156/93, 156/305, 28/107, 493/210, 112/130, 414/792.7, 414/27, 271/69
International ClassificationD02G3/02, D05B13/00, D05B35/02, D05B35/04
Cooperative ClassificationD05B13/00, D05D2305/04, D05D2305/12, D02G3/02, D05B35/04
European ClassificationD05B35/04, D02G3/02, D05B13/00