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Publication numberUS3424695 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1969
Filing dateSep 28, 1965
Priority dateSep 28, 1965
Publication numberUS 3424695 A, US 3424695A, US-A-3424695, US3424695 A, US3424695A
InventorsPeter Von Wiesenthal
Original AssigneePeter Von Wiesenthal
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Improving reformer-furnace performance by using gas-turbine exhaust
US 3424695 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. `28. 1969 P. VON wlEsrsN-rr-wu.v 3,424,695

, IMPROVING REFORMER'FURNACE PERFORMANCE BY USING GAS-TURBINE EXHA F'lled Sept.. 28. 1965 UST Hg! er;

@As runslus sxMAusT Sheet 'of 5 PETER von WIESENTHAL ATTORNEY Jan. 28, 1969 P voN WIESENTHAI.

IMPROVING REFORMER-FURNACE PERFORMANCE I BY USING GAS-TURBINE EXHAUST Filed Sept. 28, 1965 Sheet lllv INVENTOR.

PETER von WlESENTHAL ATTORNEY Isheet R O T N E V m ATTORNEY Jan. 28, 1969 P. voN WIESENTHAL. IMPROVING REFORMER'FURNACE PERFORMANCE BY USING GASTURBINE EXHAUST mnd sem. 28. 196,5

L. A ,H T N E s F. W n O V R E T E P United States Patent O 3,424,695 lMPROVlNG REFORMER-FURNACE PERFORM- ANCE BY USING GAS-TURBINE EXHAUST Peter von Wiesenthal, 17 E. 89th St., New York, N.Y. 10028 Filed Sept. 28, 1965, Ser. No. 490,920 U.S. Cl. 252-373 Int. Cl. C07c 1/02 4 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This disclosure relates to hydrogen production by hightemperature reforming of hydrocarbons. More particularly the invention resides in such a hydrogen plant associated with gas turbines, as for example an ammonia synthesis plant wherein gas turbines are used to drive pumps, refrigeration compressors and the like. A process and a system are taught whereby fuel economy is stepped up.

Mechanical properties of metals limit the temperatures at which gas turbines may be operated to from 700 F. to 1000 F. Generally, large volumes of excess air are necessary in order to keep turbine-blade temperatures down. Accordingly turbine exhaust contains from 16` to 19 percent of oxygen at from 700 F. to 1000 F. Basically this teaching takes advantage of high temperature, oxygen-rich turbine exhaust to promote combustion in reformer furnaces. By this expedient furnace chambers in ammonia synthesis plants (for example) can be reduced in size by from ten to thirty percent. Further, the fuel required to maintain furnace chambers at reforming temperatures is vastly reduced. Utilizing the exhaust of gas turbines improves their competitive postion vis-a-vis steam-turbine or electric-motor drives. This approach is especially facile in wall-tired reformer furnace designs with elongated burners where ductwork for the gas turbine exhaust can be conveniently positioned to support platforms for access to the burners.

These and other advantages will appear more fully from the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE I is a sketch illustrating the relationship of gas turbine and reformer furnace according to this invention.

FIGURE II is an elevation view in section of a reformer furnace arranged for using gas turbine exhaust to support combustion.

FIGURE III is an elevation view in section and taken along line 3 3 of FIGURE II.

FIGURE IV is an enlarged section through a linear burner adapted to receive gas turbine exhaust.

FIGURE V is a section taken along line 5 of FIG- URE lV.

As best seen in FIGURE I, exhaust from gas turbine 1 is delivered via ducts 2 to burners 3 where it supports combustion of a suitable fuel (generally gaseous) introduced via fuel lines 4. To produce a mixture of H2 and CO, a hydrocarbon (such as methane or propane) along 3,424,695 Patented Jan. 28, 1969 ICC with a suitable oxidant such as H2O and/or CO2, is coursed from inlet manifolds l6 through furnace tubes 7 which are filled with a suitable catalyst such as granular nickel oxide to outlet manifolds 8 all in a manner well known to those familiar with this art.

Temperatures in excess of 2000 F. are desirable in furnace chamber 9 for hydrocarbon reforming. Toward this objective elongated settings 11 include side walls 12 which are relatively close to tubes 7. Burners 3 are arranged in elongated tile troughs 13 along side walls 12 so that heat from these burners washes side walls 12 to heat them to uniform incandescence so that substantially the entire surfaces of these side walls act as heating elements. It is important that impingement of llames on catalyst lilled tubes 7 be avoided. So combustion of the gaseous fuel is contained from burner tips 14 to the exits 1-6 of troughs 13 so that tubes 7 do not see ame.

Delivery ducts 2 are internally lined with insulation. Dampers 17 and reach rods 18 offer control of turbine exhaust flow.

Combustion products are vented, with the aid of induced draft fans 19 by way of convection section 21 and stacks 22.

It will be understood by those skilled in furnace design that wide deviations may be made from the shown embodirnent without departing from the spirit of invention as set forth in the claims.

What is claimed is: 1. A process for manufacturing H2 and CO and comprising the steps of delining a furnace chamber, providing at least one burner operatively associated with the furnace chamber for maintaining the temperature therein in excess of 2000",

delivering a suitable duid fuel to the burner,

providing a supply of gas-turbine exhaust at a temperature in the range of from 700 F. to 1000 F. and with an O2 content in the range of from 16% to 19% by volume,

delivering the gas-turbine exhaust to the burner in a suicient supply to support substantially complete combustion of the fuel,

coursing a hydrocarbon stream and a suitable oxidant through at least one granular-catalyst-lled tube-1n the furnace chamber for reforming the hydrocarbon to produce H2 and CO.

2. The combination of a gas turbine having a gasturbine exhaust outlet and a furnace for producing a mixture of H2 and CO wherein the furnace includes an elongated setting having side walls and enclosing a furnace chamber,

at least one linear burner arranged along each of the side walls for heating that side wall to incandescence, means for introducing a suitable fluid fuel to each of the burners, at least one granular-catalyst-lilled tube mounted in the chamber approximately midway between the side Walls, means for coursing a hydrocarbon stream along with a suitable oxidant through the tube for reforming the hydrocarbon to produce H2 and CO,

means for venting combustion products from the cornbustion chamber,

delivery means connecting the gas-turbine exhaust outlet with each of the burners whereby the gas-turbine 3 4 exhaust serves as combustion-supporting gas for the References Cited fuel- UNITED STATES PATENTS 3. The combination of claim 2 with the burners mounted at more than one level on each of the side Walls.

4. The combination of claim 3 with the delivery means including a plurality of ducts 5 E' C' THOMAS Prlmary Examiner' arranged along both of the side walls and below H. S. MILLER, Assistant Examiner. the burner levels,

a platform arranged for burner access and supported US' C1' XR' on at least one of the ducts. lo 23-288g 48-212 3,334,971 8/1967 James et al 23-204

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3334971 *Aug 18, 1964Aug 8, 1967Chemical Construction CorpCatalytically reforming hydrocarbon and steam mixtures
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3899420 *Mar 24, 1972Aug 12, 1975Japan Atomic Energy Res InstSteam reformer for hydrocarbons
US4101376 *Sep 17, 1976Jul 18, 1978Metallgesellschaft AktiengesellschaftTubular heater for cracking hydrocarbons
US4332546 *May 7, 1980Jun 1, 1982Exxon Research & Engineering Co.Process and apparatus for furnace operation with gas seal
US4681701 *Jul 14, 1986Jul 21, 1987Shell Oil CompanyProcess for producing synthesis gas
US5247907 *May 5, 1992Sep 28, 1993The M. W. Kellogg CompanyProcess furnace with a split flue convection section
US7874760 *Feb 19, 2004Jan 25, 2011Ernst Grob AgTooth profile of a spline shaft
WO2007034107A2 *Sep 15, 2006Mar 29, 2007Air LiquideMethod for producing synthetic gas using an oxygen-containing gas produced by at least one gas turbine
Classifications
U.S. Classification48/127.9, 48/198.7, 48/212, 48/198.8, 422/211, 48/214.00A
International ClassificationF02C6/18, C01B3/38, B01J8/06, C10G9/20
Cooperative ClassificationC01B3/384, F02C6/18, B01J8/062, C10G9/20, C01B3/38
European ClassificationC01B3/38, C01B3/38B, F02C6/18, B01J8/06B, C10G9/20
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 18, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: LINDE AKTIENGESELLSCAFT WIESBADEN, GERMANY A CORP.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:SELAS CORPORATON OF AMERICA A CORP. OF PA;REEL/FRAME:004156/0552
Effective date: 19830523
Owner name: LINDE AKTIENGESELLSCAFT A CORP. OF GERMANY,GERMANY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SELAS CORPORATON OF AMERICA A CORP. OF PA;REEL/FRAME:004156/0552
Jan 28, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: SELAS CORPORATION OF AMERICA A CORP. OF PA
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:FIRST PENNSYLVANIA BANK N.V., FOR ITSELF AND AS AGENT FOR THE PHILADELPHIA NATIONAL BANK;REEL/FRAME:004096/0520
Effective date: 19821231