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Publication numberUS3425414 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1969
Filing dateMay 28, 1965
Priority dateMay 28, 1965
Publication numberUS 3425414 A, US 3425414A, US-A-3425414, US3425414 A, US3425414A
InventorsRoche William J La
Original AssigneeRoche William J La
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inhalant dispenser
US 3425414 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 4, 1969 w. J. LA ROCHE 3,425,414

' INHALANT DISPENSER Filed May 28, 1965 Sheet 'of 2 FIG; 1

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Feb. 4, 1969 w, J, LA ROCHE 3,425,414

INHALANT DISPENSER Filed May 28, 1965 1 N VEN TOR.

United States Patent 3,425,414 INHALANT DISPENSER William J. La Roche, 222 Righters Mill Road, Penn Valley, Montgomery 'County, Pa.

Filed May 28, 1965, Ser. No. 459,722 US. Cl. 128-201 14 Claims Int. Cl. A61m 15/02, 15/06 ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A positive pressure inhalant device is shown and described having a capsule compartment and a separate inhalant cartridge compartment with an independently movable dividing means separating the compartments with at least one passageway in the dividing means providing communication from one compartment to the other. The dividing means is also provided with piercing means for puncturing a gas-containing capsule positioned in the first compartment and for piercing one end of an inhalant cartridge positioned in the second compartment. A mouthpiece is also provided having piercing means for puncturing the other end of the inhalant cartridge.

This invention relates to a multi-purpose inhalant dispenser and particularly to a dispenser operable under a positive pressure in which a gas under pressure is passed through an impregnated filler or liquid in order to deliver a stream in vapor or mist form to the user for inhaling.

The invention further relates to providing means externally resembling a cigarette or cigar for accomplishing the said positive pressure inhalant function.

Several attempts have been made in the prior art to provide positive pressure dispersion of an inhalant. One example of such a device is shown in the patent to Richard S. Johnson No. 2,651,303 in which a gas sealed in a cartridge under pressure is released through a valve for purposes of inhaling. In such devices the principal resistance to flow is a mechanical valve, and the principal inhalant is the gas itself. The disadvantage of such a systern is that it is entirely dependent on the action of the mechanical valve and also it is narrowly limited in the nature and purpose of the inhalant material.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide an apparatus for positive pressure dispersion of a variety of inhalant materials for a multiplicity of purposes.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus for positive pressure dispersion of an inhalant in which a preselected gas, such as oxygen, may be inserted into the apparatus by the user in the form of a cartridge and a preselected inhalant may be introduced by the user into the apparatus in a separate cartridge so positioned as to be in the path of a flow of gas from the first cartridge when the cartridges are pierced.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide positive pressure dispersion apparatus which is sufficiently compact to be in the general form of an elongated cigarette or cigar and at the same time be easily and safely operated by the user.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become evident from the following description of two examples of apparatus illustrating the present invention, reference being made to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an enlarged front elevational view partly broken away and partly in section showing the apparatus of the present invention in the form of a cigar;

FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1 depicting the various individual elements of the apparatus;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of one of the elements of the apparatus taken from a different angle than in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged view of the portion of FIG. 1 bounded by the dot and dash lines indicated generally at IV in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged front elevational view similar to FIG. 1 showing a modification of the apparatus in the form of a cigarette; and

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of one of the elements shown in FIG. 5.

Turning now to the embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, a tubular device generally designated 10 is shown having a lower outer casing member 11 and an upper outer casing member 12. Lower casing 11 is provided with lower internal threads 1141 and upper internal threads 11b. Vent opening is also provided in the wall of lower casing 11. Upper casing 12 is likewise provided with lower internal threads 12a and upper external threads 1212. An O-ring is internally positioned within upper casing 12 as shown in FIG. 2. Threaded opening 12d is provided for reception of check valve assembly 24 to be described later.

For ease of assembly two split rings are provided, namely, a lower split retaining ring 13 and an upper split retaining ring 14. These split rings are each provided with an external groove 13a and 14:: respectively and with external threads 13b and 1412 respectively. Positioned within each of the split rings 13 and 14 are snap retainer rings 15 and 16 respectively.

As shown in FIG. 2, there is also provided a rotatable sleeve 17 having ridges formed in its external surface and having a lower rim 17b and upper rim 170 as shown in FIG. 1. Also provided in sleeve 17 are internal threads 170. which are functionally operative in a way to be described later. At the lower end of the casing 10 there is provided a closure element 18 having external ridging 18a and external threads 18b. In the upper end of the structure shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, there is provided a mouthpiece 20 having an opening 20a and provided with a plurality of openings 20b in its lower end. There is also provided recess 200 within mouthpiece 20 and external ridges 20d which facilitate rotation of the mouthpiece 20. Also formed internally of mouthpiece 20 is a contact surface centrally positioned in the form of a ring 2lle and internal threads 20 formed in the lower portion of the inside wall of mouthpiece 20. A piercing pin 21 having a slit 21a is centrally mounted within a depression outlined by the pressure surface 20a.

Turning now to the apparatus to be mounted within the assembled tube shown generally at 10, there is shown in FIGS. 1 and -2 a cartridge 22 having a cap 22a. Cartridge 22 contains a gas, such as oxygen, under pressure and is adapted to be inserted into the lower end of the opening of lower outer casing 11. There is also shown a cylindrical cartridge 23 having a lower closure member 23a and upper closure member 23b as well as an outer wall 230. Cartridge 23 contains an impregnated filler 23d and is adapted to be inserted into the lower end of the opening of lower outer casing 11. Cartridge 23 has a lower closure member 23a and an upper closure member 23b as well as an outer wall 23c. Cartridge 23 is adapted to be inserted into the upper open end of upper outer casing 12 prior to afi'ixing threaded mouthpiece 20.

Mounted within threaded opening 12d is a check valve assembly 24 shown in greater detail in FIG. 4 in which there is shown outer opening 24a, a ball 24b as well as a spring 24c and an adjusting nut 24d having a delivery opening 24e which communicates with a delivery chamber 24 'in one direction and with internal chamber 25 in the other direction.

Returning now to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, there is shown a piercing sleeve 30 provided with external threads 30a and with an internally positioned O-ring 30b which serves to form an internal chamber 30c. As shown in FIG. 3, there is also provided a circular depression 30d in sleeve 30 which serves as a seat for the spring 34. Openings 30s are provided for passage of gas under pressure delivered from cartridge 22. Also formed integrally with threaded sleeve 30 is a lower piercing pin 32 and an upper piercing pin 33, the latter pin being provided with a slit 33a.

An alternate form of the present invention is shown in FIGS. and 6 of the drawings in which corresponding numbers starting with 110 have been used to designate the various parts. It should be noted that the overall external appearance of the device shown in FIG. 5 is in the general form of an elongated cigarette, whereas the external appearance of the device shown in FIG. 1 is in the general form of a cigar.

In FIG. 5 the device shown generally as 110 has a lower outer casing 111, provided with a vent 1110, and an upper outer casing 112. Within the casing there is shown a lower split retaining ring 113 and and an upper split retaining ring 114. An adjusting sleeve 117 is provided to carrying out a general function similar to the adjusting ring 17 of FIGS. 1 and 2. At the lower end of the body 110 there is provided a threaded closure member 118 and at the upper end there is shown a mouthpiece 120 having an opening 120a communicating with holes 12% and having external ridging as shown in FIG. 6. Also afiixed to mouthpiece 120 is a piercing pin 121 which is mounted within the depression defined by the pressure surface 120e. Internal threads 120i are provided as shown in FIG. 6. A gas pressure cartridge 122 is shown in position for use and an inhalant cartridge 123 is shown mounted in position for use in the upper portion of the body 110. A check valve 124 is shown having a structure and function comparable to check valve 24 of FIG. 1. Check valve 124 communicates with chamber 125 as shown in FIG. 5. Sleeve 130 terminates at its lower end in a chamber 130c and has a lower piercing pin 132 as well as an upper piercing pin 133. Spring 134 is mounted within the chamber 125 and has a function comparable to that of spring 34 of FIG. 1.

Having described the component parts of two preferred forms of my invention, I will now describe the assembly of these component parts into the final devices and the method of using these devices in their intended manner.

Taking first the form of the invention shown in FIGS. 1 to 4 inclusive, the component parts are assembled by first inserting threaded sleeve 30 within adjusting sleeve 17 with the piercing pins 32 and 33 positioned as shown in FIG. 2. The external threads 30a of sleeve 30 thus engage the internal threads 17d of sleeve 17, and this threaded engagement is continued so that sleeve 30 comes to a position approximately central along the longitudinal axis of sleeve 17. With snap ring removed from split retaining ring 13, there are four segments made available. These four segments are assembled inside sleeve 17 and snap ring 15 is forced into position, thus expanding split ring 13 to a tight fit against the inner wall of sleeve 17. In a similar fashion, split ring 14 is inserted into the other open end of sleeve 17 and expanded to a tight fit against the inner wall of sleeve 17 by snap ring 16. With split rings 13 and 14 firmly in place within sleeve 17, a cementing compound is applied to threads 13b and 14b after which lower casing member 11 is threaded to threads 13b sufficiently far to provide a working fit against sleeve 17, and upper casing member 12 is threaded to threads 14b likewise to a working fit against the other end of sleeve 17. The cementing compound is then allowed to harden, thus preventing further rotation of easing members 11 and 12 relative to retaining rings 13 and 14 respectively. Spring 34 is then inserted through the open end of upper casing member 12 and is seated in spring recess 30d.

Pressure capsule 22 is now inserted in the open lower end of easing element 11 and is forced into engagement with O-ring 30b by tightening closure element 18 which engages the lower rounded portion of capsule 22 and thus forces the neck portion of capsule 2 2 into a tight fit against O-ring 30b. Cartridge 23 is then inserted into the open end of upper casing element 12 in which position it rests against the upper end of spring 34. The threads 20f of mouthpiece 20 are then engaged with the threads 12b of casing member 12 and the mouthpiece 20 is rotated, thus forcing cartridge 23 downward against the spring 34 which is thereby compressed. Piercing pins 33 and 21 penetrate closing means 23a and 23b respectively. With cartridge 23 thus firmly fixed in position and pierced at both ends, sleeve 17 is rotated. During such rotation piercing sleeve 30 is prevented from rotating by the frictional fit between the O-ring 30b and neck of pressure cartridge 32. However, this fit permits longitudinal sliding movement of sleeve 30. Consequently piercing sleeve 30 is caused to move toward or away from pressure cartridge 22 depending upon the direction of rotation of sleeve 17. In placing the device in condition for operative use, sleeve 17 is rotated to the full extent of the downward travel of piercing sleeve 30. In this position very little gas under pressure will be released since the pin 32 and the surface around it will be blocking the exit from cartridge 22. At this point a slight rotation of sleeve 17 in the opposite direction will permit the flow of gas under pressure into the chamber 300 and through the openings 30e to the chamber 25. With positive pressure thus present in chamber 25, the check valve 24 will close and the gas under pressure will make its way through the opening in the closure member 23a. Backward flow of such gas is prevented by O-ring 30b and flow of such gas around the outside of cartridge 23 is prevented by O-ring 12c. The gas under pressure is now forced through the impregnated filler material 23d with a sweeping action which carries along vaporized material being released from the impregnated filler. The gas emerges from the opening formed in the upper closure member 23b of cartridge 23 and, therefore, consists of a mixture of the gas under pressure and the vapors released from the filler material. This gaseous mixture makes its way through the openings 20b in the mouthpiece 20 into the opening 20a at which point the mixture is readily available for inhaling by the user. Since there will normally be a slight negative pressure at the mouthpiece, the extent of pressure required can be minimized by proper manipulation of sleeve 17, and this will extend the time during which the mixed vapors will be presented under pressure for inhaling. When there is no longer gas under pressure flowing from cartridge 22, it is possible to continue use of the device in order to make use of the final vapors present in cartridge 23. This is accomplished by creating sufficient negative pressure to open the check valve 24, thereby admitting outside air into the casing 11 and drawing it through cartridge 23 to the mouthpiece. Vent hole is provided as a safey vent to relieve the pressure which might build up in the event all other openings become clogged. In such event, the pressure would be sutficient to force the gas under pressure to pass O-ring 30b into the chamber 13 from whence it would escape from vent hole 110. However, under normal operation, there will be no flow of air in either direction through vent hole 110.

In using the cigarette apparatus shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, the same procedure would be followed as in the case of the cigar embodiment of FIGS. 1 to 4. It will be noted that in both embodiments cartridges 23 and 123 are forced down against springs 34 and 134 respectively. Consequently when it is desire-d to replace the cartridge, the mouthpiece 20 or 120 is removed by rotating in the proper direction whereupon the spring ejects the cartridge by forcing it away from piercing pin 33 or 1 33, as the case may be.

In using the present invention, it is contemplated that the gas under pressure may contribute beneficial effects as Well as pressure effects. For example, oxygen or mixtures of oxygen and other gases may be employed for this purpose. Likewise, it is contemplated that the cartridge 23 or 123 may contain a wide variety of substances as, for instance, medicinal materials, such as menthol and the like, flavor materials or materials known to be helpful in the breaking of the cigarette habit. In this latter category, it is contemplated that the cartridge 23 or 123 could contain filler material impregnated with a substance containing Bantron which is the trade name for a product marketed by Purex Corporation, Ltd. of Wilmington, Calif.

The invention further allows for the inhalation of oxygen by persons affiicted with a variety of cardiac and ventilatory or pulmonary disorders in which administration of an enriched oxygen supply is ordinarily helpful. The portability of the device permits a greater facility of utilization by the ambulant patient. Athletes or other individuals under conditions of physical strain in which oxygen requirements are increased may apply the principles of the device of the present invention to advantage in the correction or reduction of oxygen deficits. The potential for use of combinations of inhaled gases and flavors or medicines generally effective in inhaled form is provided by the tandem arrangement of the gas-filled cylinder and the impregnated filler, particularly where the filler is made of a cylinder of cellulose or similar porous, absorbent material treated by various degrees of saturation with flavors, medicines or other useful substances. Oxygen, thus delivered to the user along a controlled course through a variety of flavored, interchangeable and replaceable fillers, allows for the inhalation of potentially therapeutic gas under more pleasant conditions than would normally be the case. Obversely, the pleasant experience of tasting, smalling and inhaling the various individually selected materials or flavors will have the added advantage of the concurrent potentially beneficial effects of the inhalation of pure oxygen.

An alternate use of this invention involves the delivery of a medicated or flavored mist from the body of the device by the nebulizing action of the gas under pressure through a liquid-filled cylinder placed in the position otherwise occupied by the impregnated (cellulose) filler. Certain medications, such as bronchodilators, are ordinarily effective in the treatment of asthma only in the form of inhaled mists. A suitable mist would be provided by the combined effect of puncturing the upper capsule and introducing gas under pressure.

In addition to the medicinal use of the device of the present invention, there is provided a further advantage for users who desire to continue in the usual motions of cigar or cigarette smoking without actually inhaling cigarette smoke. The device may, therefore, be used in place of cigar or cigarette smoking while at the same time providing the desired mixed vapors for inhaling.

While certain preferred forms of the present invention have been described and illustrated, it will be understood that no attempt has been made to illustrate or describe all possible equivalent forms or variations of the invention. Various modifications and changes, such as changes in shape, arrangement of parts and relative size, may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention herein disclosed. For example, the gas under pressure in the capsule may be pure oxygen or mixtures of suitable gases, or in certain cases air under pressure may be used. Likewise, in the cartridge element there may be contained an impregnated filler material, such as cellulose or methyl cellulose, or in some cases the cartridge may contain a liquid inhalant material.

Having thus described my invention, I claim as follows:

1. A positive pressure inhalant device comprising a casing, dividing means positioned within said casing forming therein a lower compartment and an upper compartment and independently movable axially within said casing, a capsule containing a gas under pressure positioned within said lower compartment, a cartridge containing an inhalant material positioned within said upper compartment, a mouthpiece open at one end and operatively attached to and in communication with said casing, at least one passageway in said dividing means for passage of gas under pressure from said lower compartment to said upper compartment, piercing means at each end of said dividing means for puncturing said capsule and one end of said cartridge on axial movement of said dividing means, means connected to said dividing means to provide said axial movement and additional piercing means adapted to pierce the other end of said cartridge, whereby an intermixture of gas and inhalant material is presented under positive pressure to the user at the open end of said mouthpiece when said capsule and said cartridge are pierced.

2. The inhalant device of claim 1 including spring means positioned within said upper compartment between said dividing means and the lower surface of said cartridge.

3. The inhalant device of claim 1 including a check valve positioned in the casing wall in the lower portion of the upper compartment whereby air may be drawn into said upper compartment and through said cartridge on application of negative pressure by the user in excess of the positive pressure exerted by the gas contained in said capsule at the locus of the check valve.

4. The inhalant device of claim 1 said additional piercing means is affixed to the lower portion of said mouthpiece and projects into the upper compartment for piercing engagement with said capsule.

5. A positive pressure inhalant device comprising a casing, independently movable dividing means positioned within said casing and in operative engagement therewith thereby forming therein a lower compartment and an upper compartment, outlet means communicating with said upper compartment, a capsule containing a gas under pressure positioned within said lower compartment, a cartridge containing an inhalant material positioned within said upper compartment, piercing means projecting into said lower compartment and movable into piercing engagement with said capsule on motion of said dividing means in a downward direction parallel to the longitudinal axis of said casing, and means operative by the user and connected to said dividing means for causing said dividing means to move relative to the casing in directions parallel to the longitudinal axis of the casing, means for piercing the upper and lower parts of said cartridge, and at least one passageway in said dividing means for passage of gas under pressure from said lower compartment to said upper compartment, whereby an intermixture of gas under pressure and inhalant material is delivered to the upper compartment on axial piercing movement of said dividing means.

6. The inhalant device of claim 5 in which a part of the casing is a manually rotatable sleeve, threads formed in at least a portion of the internal surface of said sleeve, threads formed in the surface of the dividing means, said sleeve threads being in operative engagement with said dividing means threads, and means restraining rotary motion of said dividing means whereby rotation of said sleeve causes motion of the dividing means in directions parallel to the longitudinal axis of the casing.

7. The inhalant device of claim 6 in which the means for restraining rotary motion of said dividing means includes a ring member positioned within the dividing means for frictional engagement with the capsule positioned in the lower compartment.

8. The inhalant device of claim 5 in which the dividing means is provided with said piercing means at its lower 5 and upper surfaces respectively for piercing the capsule and lower cartridge surfaces respectively.

9. The inhalant device of claim 1 in which the gas under pressure in the capsule is oxygen.

10. The inhalant device of claim 1 in which the gas under pressure consists of a mixture of gases.

11. The inhalant device of claim 1 in which the gas under pressure is air.

12. The inhalant device of claim 1 in which the cartridge contains a. filler material impregnated with an inhalant material.

13. The inhalant device of claim 1 in which the cartridge contains a liquid inhalant material.

14. The inhalant device of claim 1 in which piercing of the cartridge at both ends thereof is accomplished by pressure exerted through the mechanical attachment of the mouthpiece to the casing.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 809,662 1/1906 Barnes 128200 10 2,225,201 12/1940 Anderson 128203 X 2,705,007 3/1955 Gerber 128200 2,860,638 11/1958 Bartolomeo 128201 2,920,623 1/1960 Holt 128208 15 3,012,694 12/1961 Johnston 128-203 X WILLIAM E. KAMM, Primary Examiner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification128/203.21
International ClassificationA61M15/06, A61M15/00, A61M11/02, A61M11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2015/0041, A61M2202/0468, A61M15/06, A61M15/0028, A61M2202/0208, A61M2205/8225, A61M11/02
European ClassificationA61M15/00C, A61M15/06, A61M11/02