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Publication numberUS3425479 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1969
Filing dateAug 29, 1966
Priority dateAug 29, 1966
Publication numberUS 3425479 A, US 3425479A, US-A-3425479, US3425479 A, US3425479A
InventorsAbate Leo, Anderle Joseph A, Lorentzen Hans K
Original AssigneeLevolor Lorentzen Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Venetian blind construction suitable for low heads and narrow slats
US 3425479 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 4, 1969 kH. K.LoREN1zEN ETAL VENETIA BLIND CONSTRUCTION SUITABLE FOR LOW l HEADS AND NARROW SLATS Filed Aug. 29, 1966 Sheet. of 2 FIG.3

INVENTORS HANS K- URE/V 7' ZEN JOSEPH A, ANDERL E TTORNEY Feb. 4,196.9 H:K.LoREN1-2EN ETAL Y 3,425,479

VENETIAN BLIND CONSTRUCTIOHSUITABLE FOR LOW v HEADS AND NARROW SLATS Filed Aug. 29, 196e Sheetv 2 0f 2 FIG.|24

INVENTORS Y HANS /6 ORE/772 JOSEP/1' AERL 5 l 0 ABATE ATTORNEY United States Patent O1 ice 12 Claims ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE The height of the worm-and-gear tilter is reduced by placing the worm of the tilter between the gear and the front wall of the head channel of the blind. The worm A shaft extends through an opening in the head channel that is spread over an area which includes the juncture of the front and bottom walls of the head channel. The projecting end of the worm shaft is provided with a quick-detachable hook on `which a baton or wand of hexagonal cross section is swingably hung, the baton or Wand being rotatable to tilt the slats of the blind. The diameter of the rockers which transmit the tilting motion to the ladders of the blind is reduced; and the rockers are rendered effective through an increased angle of oscillation by t-he sidepieces of the ladders extending across the tops of the rockers when the slats are untilted, the front sidepieces of the ladders being secured to the rear of the rockers, and the rear sidepieces of the ladders being secured to the front of the rockers.

Background of the invention In most present-day Venetian blinds, t-he ladder-andslat assembly is suspended beneath an enclosed metal head. The head consists primarily of a sheet-metal channel and the mechanism contained therein, including means for supporting the ladder-and-slat assembly and manipulating the ladders to tilt the slats of the blind. Such means may include a tilt rod, cradles on which the tilt rod is mounted for tilting movement, a worm-andgear tilter for oscillating the tilt rod, and rockers mounted on the tilt rod and to which the upper ends of the sidepieces of the ladders are attached.

Most Venetian blinds have been made with so-called wide slats, which are approximately 2" `wide and wider. Blinds made with wide slats normally have had a head channel which is approximately 2 wide and often approximately 2 high. Such a head channel provides amp-le room for the tilter, cradles and rockers. Because of space limitations and also because of appearance, itis sometimes desired to make blinds with narrow slats, for example only 1578" wide or even as litle as 1" wide. Because of space limitations and also because of appearance, a head channel may be desired which is low and sometimes narrow as well. Also, less metal is required to make a low channel, particularly if it is narrow as well.

The present invention provides a Venetian blind construction which is suitable for blinds in which, if desired, the slats may be only 1 wide or even narrower and the head channel may be as little as 1% inwidth and may have a height of somewhat less than l".

Description of the preferred embodiment The side or face of the blind which is toward the room will be considered to be the front of the blind, and the other side or face will be considered to be the rear of the blind.

The blind includes a ladder-and-slat assembly, the slats being vertically spaced when the blind is extended and 3,425,479 Patented Feb. 4, 1969 the slats are untilted. The slats rests on the rungs of ladderlike elements, and tilting of the slats is effected by manipulating the upper ends of the ladderlike elements in known manner. In the trade different nomenclatures, and even conflicting nomenclatures, are applied to the ladderlike element and the parts thereof, The term ladder is used herein to designate the entire ladderlike element. The longitudinal members of the ladder, one of which extends vertically in front of the series of slats and the other of which extends vertically in the rear of the series of slats, are designated herein as sidepieces The members of the ladder which interconnect the sidepieces and on which the slats rest are referred to herein as either crosspieces or rungs In addition to the above specific names, other specic names may at times be used in the description and claims to conveniently identify other parts, but all such nomenclature is to be understood as having the broadest meaning consistent with the context and with the concept of the invention as distinguished from the pertinent prior art. Except as otherwise indicated, the description hereinafter refers to the particular form or forms of the invention shown in the drawings; it does not'necessarily refer to any other form in which the invention may be embodied. The claims, however, do embrace other forms in which the invention may be embodied.

The best modes thus far contemplated of carrying out the invention are herein disclosed. Nevertheless the disclosure is -by way of illustration and example, since other specific modes are possible, and in some instances it may be sufficient to realize only some of the advantages of the invention.

FIGURE 1 is a top plan View of the blind, the ladderand-slat assembly being concealed by the head bar. Portions of the blind are broken out to t the view to the sheet.

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary front elevation of the blind, showing a portion of the ladder-and-slat assembly and showing the portion of the head that lies to the left of the left-hand break line in FIGURE l.

FIGURE 3 is a detail View showing an end portion of a sidepiece of a ladder, equipped with a barb that is used to attach the sidepieces to the rocker or bottom bar of the blind as the case may be.

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary vertical section on the line 4 4 of FIGURE l. No parts are shown which lie wholly to the left of the cradle through which the line 4 4 passes.

FIGURE 5 is a 4fragmentary vertical section on the line 5 5 of FIGURE 1. No parts are shown `which lie wholly to the left of the cradle through which the line 5 5 passes.

yFIGURE 6 is a fragmentary vertical section on the line 6 6 of FIGURE l. This view shows the :portion of the tilter worm-shaft which projects outside `of the head channel and shows the connection of that shaft to the 'baton or wand but, within the head channel, no parts are shown which lie wholly to the left of the cradle that is on the left -of the line 6 6.

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary view in sectional elevation, taken generally on the line 7 7 of FIGURE 2. The ladder, slats and Ibaton are shown in elevation, and the tilter including the worm shaft thereof is also shown in elevation.

FIGURE 8 is a detail elevational view showing in full lines the lower end-portion of the worm shaft with the baton and connector removed. To show the relationship to the head, the head is indicated in phantom lines and the end-portion of the worm-shaft is extended to the head in phantom lines.

FIGURE 9 is a detail elevational view showing a modification of the lower end-portion of the worm shaft.

FIGURE is a view of the end-portion of the worm shaft shown in FIGURE 9 with the shaft rotated 90 with respect to FIGURE 9.

FIGURE 1l is a largely diagrammatic view showing the manner of attaching the baton to an S-shaped member which, with a connecter sleeve, connects the baton to the lower end of the worm shaft.

FIGURE 12 is the same type of view as FIGURE 7 but showing the connector sleeve in full lines in elevated position for attachment or detachment of the baton. The dotted-line showing of the worm and gear that appears in FIGURE 7 is omitted in FIGURE 12.

FIGURE 13 is a fragmentary elevation showing a joint that is introduced into the baton in some instances where the blind is very tall and the baton is correspondingly long.

FIGURE 14 is a fragmentary elevation, partially in section, corresponding to FIGURE 13 but with the baton rotated through 90 as compared to FIGURE 13.

A ladder-and-slat assembly designated as a whole by 15 is positioned beneath a head which is designated as a whole by 16. The ladder-and-slat assembly includes a series of slats 17 that are supported and articulated together in known manner by two or more ladders 18. Each ladder 18 has a front sidepiece 18a and a rear sidepiece 18b, the two sidepieces being interconnected by vertically spaced crosspieces or rungs 18C on which the slats 17 rest. The ladder shown is of the string type, the sidepieces 18a and 18b being braided cords and each crosspiece 18C being a plurality of filaments which may be braided or twisted into one or more strands.

The head 16 consists primarily of a sheet-metal channel 20 and the mechanism that is contained therein. The channel 20 has a front wall 20a, a rear wall 2011 and a bottom wall 20c. Along the upper edges of each of the front and rear walls 20a and 201) there is a longitudinally-extending ange 20d which is folded inwardly and downwardly. The bottom wall 20c `is pierced in customary manner for the passage into the channel 20 of each sidepiece 18a or 18b of the ladders and each lift cord 22 and 22.

A steel tilt-rod 24 of D-shaped cross section is journalled in two or more cradles 26, the bearings of the cradles being low so as to position the tilt rod abnormally close to the bottom 20c of the head channel. Each cradle is a l-piece sheet-metal stamping a base 26a and spaced vertical legs 26b and 26e. Each leg is formed with a semicylindrical bearing at b (FIGURES 6, 4 and 1) in which the tilt rod 24 is journalled. The vertical leg 26e is provided with an arm 26d (FIGURES 6 and 1) which has two fingers 26e and 26j. As is shown in connection with the left-hand cradle 26 in FIGURE 1, the arm 26d initially projects perpendicularly to the tilt rod 24 and the fingers 26e and 26j initially project parallel to the tilt rod 24. Viewed as in FIGURE 1, the finger 26e can 'be bent 90 counterclockwise from its left-hand-cradle position to its right-hand-cradle position. In its right-handcradle position the finger 26e is disposed over the tilt rod 24 and thereby holds the tilt rod in the upwardly-opening semicylindrical cradle-bearings b. If the cradle 26 be adjacent to the right-hand end of the tilt rod, as is the right-hand cradle 26 in FIGURE 1, the arm 26d may be bent as a whole 90 counterclockwise from the left-hand-cradle position; this disposes the finger 26e above the tilt rod 24 to hold it in the bearings b and disposes the finger 26)c across the end of the tilt rod to act as a stop which limits longitudinal movement of the tilt rod to the right in FIGURE 1. For a better understanding of the arm 26d, see FIGURE 6 which shows the arm in elevation before itis bent.

To obviate too many reference characters on the drawing in connection with the cradle and associated parts, certain reference characters hereafter are omitted in a number of instances in some of FIGURES l, 2, 4, 5 and 6. Parenthetical notes will help the reader find each such 4 reference character where it does appear on the drawing.

The base 26a of each cradle (see FIGURES 4 and l) rests against the bottom 20c of the head channel (see FIGURES l, 2 and 5) and is secured thereto in any suitable manner, e.g., by sheet-metal fingers 20e (see FIG- URE 2 and left-hand cradle of FIGURE 1). The fingers 20e, which are struck up from the bottom 20c of the head Channel, interlock with edge notches 26g in the base of the cradle (see left-hand cradle in FIGURE 1) and are clinched against the top surface of the base of the cradle as is shown in FIGURES 2 and 1.

The base 26a of the cradle is provided with a central hole 26h (see left-hand cradle in FIGURE l) which registers with a hole (not shown) in the bottom 20c of thc head channel to afford vertical passage of the lift cord 22. The metal surrounding the hole 26h in the base of the cradle is embossed at 261' (see FIGURES l and 4) in the manner shown at 27 in Lorentzen U.S. Patent 2,872,- 976; this provides a smooth bearing surface for the lift cord 22, which comes up through the hole 2011 and then proceeds horizontally toward the end of the head channel. Midway between the legs 2Gb and 26C the base 26a of the cradle is provided with front and rear holes 26j and 26k (see right-hand cradle in FIGURE 1) which register with holes (not shown) in the bottom 20c of the head channel and provide passage for the front and rear side pieces 18a and 18b, respectively, of the ladder 18. In forming each hole 26j and 26k the metal is drawn upwardly into a short thimble and flared outwardly in the manner of an eyelet as shown at 26m to provide a smooth bearing surface for the sidepiece of the ladder (see FIG- URES 1 and 5).

At each cradle 26 the tilt rod 24 is provided with a rocker 27, which is a one-piece sheet-metal stamping that substantially spans the space between the legs 261) and 26e of the cradle. The rocker 27 has a generally drumshaped body 27a (see FIGURE 5 and right-hand drum 27 in FIGURE 1) which is coaxial with the cradle bearings b. At each end of the drum-shaped body 27a there is an integral washer-shaped piece 27b (see FIGURES 4 and 5) which is folded into the end of the drum formation. These washer-shaped pieces 27b have D-shaped holes which mate with the D-shaped tilt rod 24 and cause the rocker to follow the oscillating movement of the tilt rod without objectionable lost motion.

One or more lift cords of the blind extend longitudinally in the head channel beneath each rocker 27. With space allowed for such passage of the lift cord or cords, and with the tilt rod 24 positioned abnormally close to the bottom 20c of the head channel, the diameter of the rocker 27 is considerably reduced, being-in actual practice approximately A rocker 5/8 in diameter, if conventionally connected to the ladder, would not impart a desirably large amount of vertical movement to the sidepieces of the ladder. In accordance with the present invention the rockers are rendered effective through an increased angle of oscillation to thereby impart desirably large vertical movement to the sidepieces of the ladder.

The drawings show the rocker 27 in mid position, i.e., in the position corresponding to the slats of the blind having no tilt. Considering the rocker to be in mid position as shown, the rocker-hole 27d is in the front of the rocker and the rocker-hole 27e is in the rear of the rocker. The front sidepiece 18a of the ladder comes up through hole 26j in the base of the cradle, extends across the top of the rocker, thence into the hole 27e in the rear of the rocker, and is secured to the rocker on the inside thereof. Conversely the rear sidepiece 18b of the ladder comes up through the hole 26k in the base of the cradle, extends across the top of the rocker, thence into the hole 27d in the front of the rocker, and is secured to the rocker on the inside thereof.

When the rocker 27 is in mid position, as shown in the drawing, the center of the rear rocker-hole 27e (see right-hand cradle in FIGURE l) lies substantially in a plane which includes both the common axis of the rocker and tilt rod and the center of front hole 26]' in the base 26a of the cradle. Likewise, the center of front rockerhole 27d lies substantially in a plane which includes both the common axis of the rocker and tilt rod and the center of rear hole 26k in the base 26a of the cradle. The net result is that with the rocker 27 in mid position the ladder-sidepieces 18a and 18b extend halfway around the rocker in passing from the holes 26j and 26k in the base of the cradle to the rocker-holes 27e and 27d, respectively.

lIf the tilt rod is oscillated forwardly from the mid position to tilt the slats of the blind forwardly by winding up the rear sidepiece 18b of each ladder and paying out the front sidepiece 18a, such movement can continue until the rocker has made substantially one-half turn. With a drum-,shaped rocker SAS in diameter, one-half turn will pay out nearly l" of the front sidepiece 18a. Meanwhile the rear sidepieces 18b has been wound up substantially l". Thus with a rocker only in diameter, nearly 2 of relative movement between the front and rear sidepieces 18a and 18b of the ladder is available to tilt the slats forwardly from the no-tilt position. If the slats are to be tilted rearwardly from the no-tilt position substantially 2" of relative movement is also available, the front sidepiece 18a being wound up and the rear sidepiece 18b being paid out.

The end of each sidepiece 18a and 18b of the ladder is provided with a sheet-metal fitting 28 (FIGURE 3) which will be called a barb. Viewed as in FIGURE 3 the left-hand half 28a of the barb is tubular and the righthand half 28b is channel-shaped. The tubular half 28a is crimped around the end portion of the cordlike sidepiece 18a or 18b of the of the ladder, and is also provided with a pair of sharp indentations as at 23e` which augment the attachment of the barb to the sidepiece 18a or 18b. To attach the end of the sidepiece to the rocker, the barb 28 is inserted lengthwise through the hole 27e or 27d, the sidepiece 18a or 18b moving into prolongation of the barb and lying in the channel-shaped half 28b of the barb. Once the barb is on the inside of the drum-shaped body 27a of the rocker, pull on the sidepiece 18a or 18b restores the barb to the crosswise position shown in FIG- URE 3 and thereby secures the sidepiece of the ladder to the body 27a of the rocker.

'The holes 27d and 27e are off center with respect to the axial length of the drum. The center of each of these holes is at a distance from one end of the drum that is substantially equal to the length of the barb 28, and at a distance from the opposite end of the drum that is substantially equal to one-half the length of the barb 28. This shortens the axial length of the dr-um 27 to 11/2 times lthe length of the barb 28. With the drum 27 in place in the head 16, the full length of the barb 28 can be inserted through the hole 27d or 27e when the barb is pointed toward the far end of the drum. Once the barb 28 is within the drum, the half-length 2817 of the barb (see FIGURE 3) can occupy the space between the center of the hole 27d or 27e and the near end of the drum; see the dottedlline showing of barb 28 within the left-hand drum 27 of FIGURE 1.

' Being nested in the cylindrical coneavity within the drum, the barb 28 doesnt spin and twist the ladder sidepiece 18a or 18b as the blind is opened and closed. In connection with the off-center arrangement of holes 27d and 27e the placing of hole 27d closer to one end of the drum and hole 27e closer to t-he opposite endof the drum keeps the sidepieces 18a and 18b separated as they are reeled in and paid o-ut by the drum.

The tilter, which is designated as a whole by 30 (FIG- URE 1) is composed of six pieces. Four of the pieces are body members 31, 32, 33 and 34 (see FIGURES 1, 2, 7 and 12), each of which is a sheet-metal stamping. l'The fth piece 35 is a Worm and worm-shaft molded in one piece from suitable plastic such as hard nylon. The sixth piece is a cast-metal gear 36.

The body members 31 and 32 are alike except for being of opposite hand. These are angle-shaped stampings having horizontal feet 31a and 32a and vertical walls 31b and 32h. The feet, which are positioned against the bottom 20c of the head channel, are notched at 31c and 32C to receive sheet-metal fingers 20j, 20f which are struck up from the bottom 20c of the head-channel and clinched over the feet 31a and 32a as is seen in FIGURE 1 to secure the tilter to the bottom of the head channel. The walls 31b and 32b of the body members 31 and 3-2 of the tilter are pierced and formed with integral short thimbles 31d and 32d which are coaxial with the cradle bearings b and which constitute bearings for the projecting hubs 36a and 3612 of the gear 36.

'The space between the hou-sing walls 3'1b and 3213 of the tilter is bridged by the upper housing member 33 and t-he lower housing member 34, each of which has two two-pronged projections p extending from each of its opposite edges. These projections mate with and pass through slots in the walls 31b and 32b, and one or both prongs of each projection are suitably bent or swaged into holding connection with the walls 31b and 32b.

The body of the gear 36 is provided with teeth which extend for 360 around its circumference, a portion of the teeth being shown in dotted lines in FIGURE 7 and being designated by the reference character 36C. The hubs 36a and 36b of the gear, which have already been referred to, project axially from the body of the gear and extend slightly beyond the ends of the bearing thimbles 31d and 32d as is seen in FIGURE 1. Because the gear is cast, the D-shaped tilt-rod hole in the center of the ge'ar is tapered, being largest at the outer end of each hub of the gear and being smallest in a zone that lies midway between. Where it is the smallest, this D-shaped hole in the gear 36 makes a sliding fit with the tilt rod 24, whereby the rod 24 will be oscillated in response to -oscillation of the gear 36 without objectionable lost motion.

-The molded plastic piece 35 includes a double-thread worm 35a (FIGURES 2 and 7). A short boss 35b projects axially `from the upper end of the worm, and a wormshaft 35e projects axially from the lower end of the worm. The upper housing member 33 is formed with an opening 33d (FIGURE 1) on one side of which the metal is drawn to form a short half-thimble 33]" which receives the boss 35h and acts as a bearing at one end of the worm. The bottom housing member 34 is pierced and formed with a short thimble 34)c (FIGURES 2 and 12) which is pierced by the shaft 35e and which acts as a bearing at the other end of the worm. The worm 35a is confined, axially, between the housing members 33 and 34, being provided with a collar 35h (FIGURES 2 and 7) which bears against housing member 34.

As seen in FIGURES 2 and 7, for example, the worm shaft 35e projects through an opening 20g in the head channel which is spread over an area that includes the juncture of the front wall 20a and the bottom wall 20c of the head channel 20. At its end the worm shaft 35C is provided with a diametrical slot 35d (FIGURE 8); this slot is the same as the slot 135d shown in FIGURE l0 but extends parallel to the plane of the paper, instead of perpendicularly to the plane of the paper as does slot d. At a distance above the slot 35d the shaft 35e is diametrically pierced by a hole 35e, which parallels the slot 35d. This hole is the same as the hole 135e that is seen in FIGURE l0, but extends parallel to the plane of the paper. A longitudinal groove at 3-'5f connects the slot 35d with the hole 35e, the groove 35j being the same as the groove 135)c seen in FIGURES 9 and 10. The diametrical slot 35d, the diametrical hole 35e an-d the longitudinal groove 351 intertit with a connecter las hereinafter explained for attachment of a baton or wand to the end of the worm shaft 35C.

FIGURES 9 and 10 show a modification of the end of the worm shaft, and in each of these figures the worm shaft is designated by 135C. The only difference between the end of the shaft 35C shown in FIGURE 8 and the 7 end of the shaft 135C shown in FIGURES 9 and 10 is that the end of shaft 135@` has, diametrically opposite the longitudinally groove 135], a duplicate longitudinal groove at 135g which connects the end slot 135d with the transverse hole 135e.

To provide ample `clearance for the entry of the tilter 30 into the head channel, the longitudinal flanges 20d (FIGURES 1 and 6) at the -upper edges of the head channel are locally collapsed and flattened at 20h as is best seen in FIGURE 1 and as is also seen in FIGURES 7 .and 12. When the tilter 30 is installed in the head channel, the gear 36 is low to the bottom of the channel, being coaxial with the bearings b of the cradles. In addition the height of the tilter is reduced by the worm 35 being located between the gear 36 and the front wall 20a of the head channel, the worm shaft 35C depending from the worm 35 as is seen in FIGURES 2 and 7. Since the rocker 27 is of small diameter, an increment of angular movement of the rocker elfects only small longitudinal movement of the sidepieces 18a and 18b of the ladder. By providing the tilter with a double-thread worm 35a, the gear 36 is advanced two teeth for each complete turn of the worm shaft 35C and correspondingly greater movement is imparted to the rockers.

The worm shaft 35e is adapted to be rotated by a baton or wand 38 which is attached thereto by a quickdetachable connection. This connection serves as a universal joint whereby the operator can rotate the baton when it is swung to various convenient positions. The baton is of hexagonal cross section which facilitates effective grasping of the baton by the operator. The baton has been made of clear cellulose acetate, and a brand thereof that has `been used is on the market under the name of Butyrate The quick-detachable connection of the baton to the worm shaft 35C includes a generally S-shaped piece of wire 39 (FIGURE ll), the lower portion of which is formed as a hook 39a and the upper portion of which includes a longitudinal portion 39h and a transverse portion 39C. The upper end of the baton 38 is thinned at 38a and provided with a hole 3811, whereby the baton is adapted to be hung on the hook 39a in the manner indicated in FIGURE 11 and then be allowed to hand down as in FIGURES 2, 6, 7 and l2.

With the `baton in the hook 39a and ready for attachment to the shaft 35a, a sleeve 40 of soft nylon is telescoped onto the shaft 35C and brought to the position shown in full lines in FIGURE 12. Then the S-shaped piece of wire 39 is applied to the shaft 35e, the transverse portion 39C being inserted into the transverse shaft hole 35e (FIGURE 8). The longitudinal portion 39h of the wire lies in the longitudinal groove 351C. Below the groove the wire swings into and across the end-slot 35d, as is seen in FIGURES 7 and 12. The sleeve 40 is then brought downwardly from the full-line position of FIG- URE 12 to the phantom-line position of that figure, which is the same as the position shown in FIGURES 1, 2, 6 and 7. The longitudinal portion 39k of the wire bulges somewhat from the groove 35jc and the sleeve 40 makes frictional engagement with this bulging portion of the wire member 39.

It will be seen that the weight of the baton 38 is carried by the transverse wire-portion 39e which is in the hole 35e in the worm shaft; also that a rotative driving connection `between the wire member 39 and the Worm shaft 35C is established by the portion of the wire member which lies in and angles across the end-slot 35d in worm shaft 35C. To detach the baton 38 it is merely necessary to slide the sleeve 40 upwardly so that the wire member 39 can be disengaged from its interitting relationship with the worm shaft.

Since the end of the worm shaft 35e has only a single longitudinal groove 35f, the transverse portion 39C of the wire 39 must be inserted into the hole 35e from the end thereof to which the groove 35j leads. In the modifi- 8 cation shown in FIGURES 9 and 10 there is a second longitudinal groove g which leads to the outer end of the hole 135e. Thus the transverse portion 39C of wire 39 can be inserted into the hole 135e from either end of the hole, and the longitudinal portion 39h of the wire will be alternatively in groove A135f or 135g.

When the baton 38 is connected to the worm shaft longitudinal groove 135g which leads to the other end of the shaft as is seen in FIGURES 2, 6 and 7, thereby preventing accidental unhooking of the baton. In packing a blind for shipment the baton may be swung parallel to the head channel 20 as is indicated in phantom lines in FIGURE 2. In the case of a blind in which the baton would project beyond the end of the head channel if folded to the phantom-line position shown in FIGURE 2, the baton 38 may be replaced by a jointed baton 138 shown in FIGURES 13 and 14. Baton 138 is made in two or more sections connected together as. shown by links 138a and 138b that are pivotally connected as shown to the adjacent sections of the baton by rivets 138e` and 13861'. When the blind is packed for shipment, the links 138:1 and 13811 permit the adjacent section of baton 138 to be folded alongside one another.

The blind will be considered to have only the two cradles 26 that are shown in FIGURE 1. Referring to FIGURE 2, the lift cord 22 extends upwardly through the central hole 26h in the cradle immediately above and then extends horizontally within the head channel 20 as shown in dotted lines. In its horizontal run in the head channel, the lift cord 22 passes through an opening in the leg 26e of the cradle 26 (left-hand cradle in FIGURE 1), thence through aligned openings in the legs 26b and 26e of the right-hand cradle 26 in FIGURE 1, land continues to the right as is indicated at the very right-hand edge of FIGURE 1. A second lift cord 22 comes up through the central hole in the bottom 0f the right-hand cradle 26 in FIGURE l (see FIGURE 5), thence horizontally through an opening in the leg 26C of that cradle, and continues on to the right as is indicated at the righthand edge of FIGURE 1.

The lift-cord opening in cradle-leg 26b is designated 26p (FIGURES 4 and 5) and the lift-cord opening in leg 26C is designated 26p (FIGURE 6). These openings are alike, each being substantially semicircular. The edge of each opening 26p and 26p' extends from the cradle-bottom 26a toward the front of the cradle to a nose 261' that is spaced somewhat from the cradle-bottom at a point toward the rear of the cradle. To obviate chafing of the lift cords, each hole 26p and 26p is formed with a welt edge 26q. This welt edge is an integral bead that is formed from the metal of the cradle-leg and which extends around the edge of the opening in the cradle-leg.

Each cradle-leg 26b and 26e` merges with the bottom 26a of the cradle on the left side of the leg as the leg is viewed in FIGURES 4, 5 and 6, but not on the .right side of the leg. The right side of each leg 26b and 26e ends at the nose 261', which is somewhat above the cradlebase 26a but which is at a level somewhat below the embossment 261' that surrounds the central lift-cord hole 26h in the cradle-base. Extending inwardly from the rear edge of each cradle-leg 26b and 26e` there is a funnelshaped cutout at 26t. With the cradles 26 in place in the head 16, and before the rear sidepieces 18b of the ladders are brought up into the head, the horizontal-extending branches of lift cords 22 and 22 can be inserted sidewise into the openings 26p and 26p' in the cradle-legs by being shifted through the cutouts at 26t and under the noses 261'. As will be understood from the top view of the cradles in FIGURE 1, each nose 261' is spaced longitudinally of the head from the embossment 26i, since the nose 26r is on a cradle-leg 26h or 26e. By reason of the lift cords passing on top of the embossments 26 and the noses 26r extending below these embossments, the horizontal runs of the lift cords are effectively confined in the openings 26p and 26p once the cords have been inserted in the openings as above outlined.

Referring to FIGURE l, the lift cords 22 and 22 continue to the right to a suitable cord lock (not shown). After passing through the cord lock the lift cords hang down in front of the blind for grasping to raise and lower the blind, all as is well-known in the art. Since the head channel is low, a low cord lock is needed; and one that can be used is the cord-lock portion of the tting shown in Lorentzen U.S. Patent 2,872,976. The cord-lock portion may be cut from that fitting by severing the base of the fitting on a line extending approximately from the reference character 2-4 to the reference character 45 in FIGURE 2 of Patent 2,872,976. The base of the cordlock may then be pierced, near the line of cut, for Iriveting of the cord lock to the bottom of the head channel. To brace the cord lock in our head channel 20 the front flange 25 of the cord lock `(in Patent 2,872,976) may be made of proper height to nest fully and snugly between our front flange 20d and the front wall 20a of our head channel. The cord lock will then be secured in our channel by the cord-lock flange 25 of Patent 2,872,976 being held against the front wall 20a of our head channel and the base of the cord-lock fitting being riveted to the bottom 20c of our head channel.

We claim:

1. A Venetian blind comprising a ladder-and-slat assembly positioned beneath a head channel having front, rear and bottom walls with a tilt rod, rockers and a wormand-gear tilter within the head channel, the tilter affording but a single oriented position for the worm and gear, the tilter including a stationary housing secured to the bottom wall of the head channel and within which the worm and the gear are rotatably mounted, and the upper ends of the sidepieces of the ladders being attached to the rockers for supporting and tilting the slats; wherein the improvement comprises:

(a) the gear of the tilter being lower to the bottom of the head channel, (b) the height of the tilter be. ing reduced by the worm thereof being located between the gear thereof and the front wall of the head channel, (c) the tilter housing including upper and lower members having portions which are tixedly aligned with the space between the gear and the front wall of the channel, (d) the worm being on a wormshaft which is journalled in said portions which are fixedly aligned with the space between the gear and the front wall of the head channel, and (e) the wormshaft extending beyond and depending from the lower of said portions which are xedly aligned with the space between the gear and the front wall of the head channel.

2. A Venetian blind as in claim 1 in which the sidepieces of the ladders are front and rear vertical cords; and the rockers are rendered effective through an increased angle of oscillation by such vertical cords of the ladders extending across the tops of the rockers when the slats are untilted, the front vertical cords of the ladders extending to the rear of the rockers and being secured to the rear of the rockers and the rear vertical cords of the ladders extending to the front of the rockers and being secured to the front of the rockers.

3. A Venetian blind as in claim 2 in which each rocker is drum-shaped and has t-wo holes in the cylindrical wall thereof, the holes extending radially to the interior of the rocker, the holes being off-center in opposite directions with respect to the axial length of the rocker; and the front and rear vertical cords of the associated ladder being secured to the rocker by elongated barbs which are attached to the ends of these cords and are inserted radially through said holes and then tipped to extend each barb lengthwise of the rocker in opposite directions from its associated hole.

4. A Venetian blind as in claim 1 in which:

the worm-shaft projects through an opening in the head channel that is spread over an area which includes the juncture of the front and bottom walls of the head channel,

and operating means is connected to the projecting end of the worm-shaft for rotation of the shaft and worm.

5. A Venetian blind as in claim 4 in which the worm of the tilter is a plural-thread worm and the operating means is a baton that is hexagonal in cross section.

6. A Venetian blind as in claim 1 in which the wormshaft projects through an opening at the bottom of the head channel, and a baton is connected to the projecting end of the worm shaft for rotation of the shaft and worm.

7. A Venetian blind as in claim 6 in which:

the lower end of the worm-shaft is provided with a hook,

a baton is swingably hung on the hook and is rotatable to tilt the slats of the blind,

and shiftable means associated with the hook is operative to retain the baton on the hook and is shiftable to afford detachment of the baton.

8. A Venetian blind as in claim 7 in which:

the hook is the lower portion of a generally S-shaped piece of wire,

the S-shaped piece of wire is adapted to intert complementarily with the lower portion of the wormshaft and, when interfitted, to make driving connection therewith,

and a sleeve is slidable longitudinally of the worm shaft and in one position retains the S-shaped piece of wire in intertting relation with the worm shaft and in another position releases the piece of wire for quick detachment of the baton from the worm shaft.

9. A Venetian blind as in claim 7 in which:

the hook is the lower portion of a generally S-shaped piece of wire,

the worm-shaft has a hole extending into it from the side of the shaft, the upper end of the generally S-shaped piece of wire extends into said hole,

and means is selectively operable to either hold the end of the wire in said hole or release the wire for detachment of the baton.

10. A Venetian blind as in claim 7 in which:

the lower end of the worm-shaft has a transverse slot,

the hook is the lower portion of a generally S-shaped piece of wire,

a portion of the wire lies in said transverse slot and makes driving connection to the worm-shaft,

and quick detachment means is operable to either hold the wire in driving relation to the worm-shaft or release it for disconnection of the baton from the shaft.

11. A Venetian blind as in claim 10 in which the worm-shaft has a longitudinal groove extending upwardly from the slot and leading to a hole which extends sidewise into the worm shaft,

and, above the hook, the generally S-shaped piece of wire extends along said groove and into said hole.

12. A Venetian blind comprising a ladder-andslat assembly positioned beneath a head channel having front, rear and bottom walls with a tilt rod, rockers and a wormand-gear tilter within the head channel, the upper ends of the sidepieces of the ladders being attached to the rockers for supporting and tilting the slats; wherein the improvement comprises:

the sidepieces of the ladders being front and rear vertical cords; and

the rockers being rendered effective through an increased angle of movement by such vertical cords of the ladders extending across the tops of the rockers when the slats are untilted, the front vertical cords of the ladders extending to the rear of the rockers and being secured to the rear of the rockers, and the rear vertical cords of the ladders extending to the front of the rockers and being secured to the front of the rockers; each rocker being drum-shaped and having front and rear holes in the cylindrical Wall thereof, the holes extending radially to the interior of the rockers, the holes being ofi-center in opposite directions with respect to the axial length of the rocker; and the front and rear vertical cords of the associated ladder being secured to the rocker by elongated barbs which are attached to the ends of, these cords and are inserted radially through said of the rocker in opposite directions from its associated hole.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS holes and then tipped to extend each barb lengthwise 10 PETER M, CAUN, Primmy Examiner.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE 0F CORRECTION Patent No. 3,425,479 February 4, 1969 Hans K. Lorentzen et al.

It is certified that error appears in the above identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 3, line 46, after "stamping" insert having 2, "outer" should read other line 8, "longitudinal groove 135g which should read 35C the end of the hook 39a is Column 8, line leads to the other end of" close against the end of Signed and sealed this 24th day of March 1970.

(SEAL) Attest:

WILLIAM E. SCHUYLER, JR.

Edward M. Fletcher, Jr.

Commissioner of Patents Attesting Officer

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3630264 *Nov 24, 1969Dec 28, 1971Levolor Lorentzen IncVenetian blind tilting apparatus
US3818969 *Nov 22, 1971Jun 25, 1974Levolor Lorentzen IncInclined-plane venetian-blind installation
US3918513 *Apr 30, 1974Nov 11, 1975Alcan Aluminum CorpVenetian blind with worm gear tilting assembly
US3921695 *Sep 30, 1974Nov 25, 1975Debs VictorWand operated venetian blind
US4141402 *Nov 7, 1977Feb 27, 1979Marathon Manufacturing CompanyVenetian blind tilter operating mechanism with snap-on wand connection
US4237957 *Mar 7, 1979Dec 9, 1980Hunter Douglas International N.V.Venetian blind and tape roll support for a venetian blind
US4386644 *Apr 16, 1981Jun 7, 1983Levolor Lorentzen, Inc.Vertical blind tilt control
US4484612 *Jun 30, 1983Nov 27, 1984Hunter Douglas International N.V.Tilting roll and tilting roll assembly for the ladder means of a venetian blind
US4487243 *May 21, 1982Dec 11, 1984Levolor Lorentzen, Inc.Venetian blind
US4507831 *Nov 22, 1982Apr 2, 1985Marathon Manufacturing CompanySpring clip for tilter worm shaft
US4607974 *Feb 27, 1984Aug 26, 1986Cooper Industries, Inc.Wand and wand extension
US4739816 *Aug 30, 1985Apr 26, 1988Levolor Lorentzen, Inc.Venetian blind system for greenhouses
US4759398 *May 17, 1985Jul 26, 1988Renee William COperator for venetian blinds combination operator and venetian blind, and method of operating venetian blinds
US4875516 *Jul 28, 1988Oct 24, 1989Norbert MaroccoVenetian blind control
US5002113 *Sep 22, 1989Mar 26, 1991Levolor CorporationTilt wand attachment for window blinds
US5139072 *Jul 22, 1991Aug 18, 1992Norbert MaroccoCoupling and transmission mechanism for drape or blind assembly
US5267598 *Jul 10, 1992Dec 7, 1993Norbert MaroccoWindow covering control apparatus and window covering assembly
US5293921 *Jul 10, 1992Mar 15, 1994Norbert MaroccoCoupling and transmission mechanism for window covering assembly
US6253823 *Dec 9, 1999Jul 3, 2001Springs Window Fashions Division, Inc.Headrail for cut down venetian type blinds
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/176.10R
International ClassificationE06B9/305, E06B9/28
Cooperative ClassificationE06B9/305
European ClassificationE06B9/305