Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3426751 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 11, 1969
Filing dateJan 3, 1967
Priority dateJan 3, 1967
Publication numberUS 3426751 A, US 3426751A, US-A-3426751, US3426751 A, US3426751A
InventorsRadewan Milton G
Original AssigneeRadewan Milton G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Post-operative nose stent
US 3426751 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 11, 1969 M. G. RADEWAN 3,426,751

POST-OPERATIVE NOSE STENT Filed Jan. 5/ 1967 INVENTOR EHg-A MILTON Ci. EADEWAN ma n gmwiak um wmb AITORNEYS United States Patent 3 Claims This invention pertains in general to surgical splints, and more particularly to a stent to be utilized post-operatively on rhinoplasty patient.

The currently utilized dressing for post-operative rhinoplasty patients is generally considered inferior due to the numerous difiiculties encountered in properly utilizing these dressings. For example, the dental mold compound appears to have a weight which is excessively heavy for a newly operated upon nose, and because of this, the dental compound applies excessive pressure to the nose. If the compound is applied very thinly to the nose, it tends to buckle away and to be ineffective. And if, in fact, the compound is applied of sufficient thickness to form a proper stent, it applies too much pressure upon the nose. The commonly used aluminum stent has always been difficult to shape properly without putting undue pressure upon certain areas of the nose and it is also difficult to get a proper fit utilizing the aluminum stent.

Therefore, it is a provision of the present invention to provide a stent to be utilized post-operatively on rhinoplasty patients which is extremely easy to use and which permits the application of varying pressures upon the nose to correspond with the needs of the patient.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a stent to be utilized post-operatively on rhinoplasty patients which not only holds the nasal structure in position, but also applies pressure against the nasal packing to reduce post-operative edema and post-operative hemorrhaging.

A still further object of the present invention is the provision of a stent which eliminates the need for extensive narrowing stitches in the nose by pulling the cheek tissues toward the nose with the help of a securing member which engages the present stent and holds it aifixed to the cheek tissues.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a stent which is easily manufactured and which may be marketed at a comparatively low price for use with rhinoplastypatients.

Other objects, advantages and capabilities of the invention will become apparent from the following descrip tion, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings showing only a preferred embodiment of the invention.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a front elevation view of a rhinoplasty patient whose nose is shown taped and bandaged after rhinoplasty, but before applying the invention;

FIGURE 2 discloses a front elevation view of a rhinoplasty patient with the splints held in place upon the nose;

FIGURE 3 shows a front elevation view of a rhinoplasty patient having the stent placed in operative position upon the nose;

FIGURE 4 is a horizontal section view taken along lines 4-4 of FIGURE 3; and

FIGURE 5 discloses the stent of the present invention and the necessary paraphernalia which is utilized with the invention to hold the nose in proper condition.

Referring to the drawings wherein like reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several figures, the nose stent to be utilized with rhinoplasty patients is indicated generally by the numeral 11. It is anticipated that the stent 11 will generally be made in standard shapes and sizes; however, because of varying nose structures, it should be apparent that the stent will at times be either enlarged, or made smaller to more adequately form the nose to the desired configuration. In any even, the stent will conform to the overall configuration herein shown.

Generally, the stent 11 will be manufactured of resilient spring steel and formed in a stylized U shaped configuration wherein the legs 12 of the stent bend outwardly in relation to the interior of the U and then subsequently terminate in a sharply bent outwardly disposed curl hook 13. It is within the intermediate leg 14 wherein the legs of the U shaped stent bend outwardly that normally engage the nose of the patient to form the operating surfaces of the stent which hold the nose in its proper shape.

In utilizing the present invention the rhinoplasty patient generally has his nose bandaged with adhesive tape 15 after the surgery and such bandaging is shown in FIG- URE 1. Once the nose has been taped, a pair of splints 16 are placed on opposing sides of the nose to help maintain the nose in its fixed position. It is anticipated that the splints 16 may be of any common thin construction such as a tongue depressor cut to the desired length. It is relatively unimportant how the splints 16 are made so long as they are rigid and of suflicient length to accomplish the intended purpose. To hold the splints 16 in proper position until the stent 11 is placed upon the nose, there is provided a suitable strip 15a of adhesive tape which encompasses the splints 16 and continues on to adhesively secure to the facial tissues of the patient.

At this point a pair of adhesive members 15b are pro vided with an aperture 17 in one end thereof which is adapted to be inserted over the curl hook 13. The free ends of the tape member 15b are then secured to the facial tissues of the patient in such a manner that the stent is suitably spread a suflicient distance to fit over the splints 16 so that the stent will exert a return pressure upon the tape members 15b to pull the cheek tissues toward the nose thus eliminating the need for extensive narrowing stitches. In addition, the tape members 15b are positioned that if there is a tendency for the nose to lean to one side of the face or the other, this can be relieved by exerting more pressure upon one side of the stent than upon the other side by proper positioning of the tape members 15b. In addition, the complete composite pressure of the stent upon the nose may be varied to provide a very comfortable apparatus for the patient.

As can be seen from the present invention, a postoperative nose stent is shown which may be used upon a variety of patients, and yet may be maintained within the very limited number of standard sizes which are suitably aflixed to the patients nose to give a form fit which has not been available with the prior art devices.

While I have particularly shown and described one particular embodiment of the invention, it is distinctly understood that the invention is not limited thereto but that modifications may be made within the scope of the invention and such variations as are covered by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A post-operative stent for rhinoplasty patients adapted to be mounted upon the patients nose comprising a substantially U shaped leaf spring member having two legs interconnected by an arcuate member to thereby form the U shaped spring member, each leg having one freely disposed end, an intermediate portion on each leg disposed between the arcuate member and the freely disposed end, the intermediate portions having a concave curvature that flares the freely disposed ends outwardly from one another, the intermediate portions normally being positioned immediately adjacent the patients nose in flanking relation thereto, means integral with the freely disposed ends to secure the spring member to the patient.

2. A post-operative stent for rhinoplasty patients adapted to be mounted upon the patients nose as set forth in claim 1, wherein the means integral with the freely disposed ends to secure the spring member to the patient comprises a curl hook on each end to which securing means are adapted to be attached for holding the spring member in operative position, the curl hook being an extension of the leg which bends sharply outwardly and rearwardly to form the book.

3. A post-operative cast for rhinoplasty patients adapted to be mounted upon the patients nose comprising in combination an elongated splint means mounted in flanking relation upon the patients nose, a substantially U shaped leaf spring member having two legs interconnected by an arcuate member to thereby form the U shaped spring member, each leg having one freely disposed end, an intermediate portion on each leg disposed References Cited FOREIGN PATENTS 1899 Great Britain. 3/1947 France.

L. W. TRAPP, Primary Examiner.

US. Cl. X.R. 128325

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
FR924289A * Title not available
GB189912987A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3742943 *Jan 3, 1972Jul 3, 1973O MalminRhinoplasty treatment, method, and apparatus
US4274402 *May 3, 1979Jun 23, 1981The Denver Splint CompanyNose splint
US4340040 *Jan 2, 1981Jul 20, 1982Straith Richard ENose splint
US4465066 *Feb 9, 1982Aug 14, 1984Carpel Emmett FSurgical drape support
US5022389 *May 25, 1990Jun 11, 1991Cornucopia Medical Products, Inc.Nasal splint device
US5515872 *Oct 11, 1994May 14, 1996Bloom & KretenClamp for nasolacrimal sac occlusion during administration of ocular medication
US5533499 *Jan 19, 1994Jul 9, 1996Creative Integration & Design, Inc.Nasal dilator
US5533503 *Sep 28, 1994Jul 9, 1996Creative Integration & Design, Inc.Nasal dilator
US5546929 *Jul 7, 1995Aug 20, 1996Muchin Jerome DNasal dilator
US5549103 *Sep 30, 1994Aug 27, 1996Creative Integration & Design, Inc.Nasal dilator having an adhesive void to allow relative movement
US5553605 *Aug 31, 1995Sep 10, 1996Muchin Jerome DTransparent external nasal dilator
US5611333 *Dec 15, 1995Mar 18, 1997Creative Integration & Design, Inc.Dilator with peel force reducing structure
US5653224 *Jun 6, 1996Aug 5, 1997Creative Integration & Design, Inc.Nasal dilator with areas of adhesive engagement of varying strength
US5718224 *Aug 16, 1996Feb 17, 1998Muchin; Jerome D.Transparent nasal dilator
US5769089 *Sep 8, 1995Jun 23, 1998Hanover CorporationExternal nasal splint
US5806525 *Sep 16, 1996Sep 15, 1998Pope, Jr.; Thaddeus HarrisApparatus and method for improving nasal breathing
US5810749 *May 21, 1996Sep 22, 1998Maas; Corey S.Nasal fixation with water-hardening fiber-mesh resin
US6058931 *Dec 22, 1997May 9, 2000Acutek InternationalNasal dilator
US6065470 *Oct 9, 1997May 23, 2000Van Cromvoirt; Lambertus AdrianusNostril dilator
US6080179 *Dec 29, 1998Jun 27, 2000Gould; David L.Resiliently retracting external nasal dilator
US6098616 *Mar 13, 1998Aug 8, 2000Acutek InternationalNon-linear nasal dilator
US6318362Jun 13, 1997Nov 20, 2001Creative Integration & Design, Inc.Nasal dilator
US6570051Jul 14, 2000May 27, 2003Wallace J. BeaudryMethod for using a dressing mechanism
US6603051Jul 14, 2000Aug 5, 2003Wallace J. BeaudryNasal epidermal lifting mechanism
US6768039Jul 14, 2000Jul 27, 2004Wallace J. BeaudryNasal epidermal lifting mechanism
US6860263 *Jul 15, 2003Mar 1, 2005Al ScogginsBand nasal dilator
US6982359Jul 14, 2000Jan 3, 2006Beaudry Wallace JNasal epidermal lifting mechanism
US7022891Apr 26, 2002Apr 4, 2006Wallace J BeaudryDressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
US7067710Jul 14, 2000Jun 27, 2006Beaudry Wallace JNasal epidermal lifting mechanism
US7186878Jan 22, 2004Mar 6, 2007Beaudry Wallace JMethod of positioning the epidermis
US7456332Dec 29, 2004Nov 25, 2008Wallace J BeaudryDressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
US7541510Jun 4, 2004Jun 2, 2009Beaudry Wallace JNasal epidermal lifting mechanism
US8026405Dec 29, 2004Sep 27, 2011Wallace J BeaudryDressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
US8115049Oct 14, 2008Feb 14, 2012Wallace J BeaudryDressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
US8188330Aug 14, 2007May 29, 2012Wallace J BeaudryDressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
US8360198Jan 19, 2012Jan 29, 2013Jo Ann LedermanHearing assistance device
US8371418Jan 19, 2012Feb 12, 2013Jo Ann LedermanHearing assistance device
US8424634Jan 19, 2012Apr 23, 2013Jo Ann LedermanHearing assistance device
US8624076May 17, 2012Jan 7, 2014Wallace J BeaudryDressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
US8657063Oct 18, 2012Feb 25, 2014Jo Ann LedermanHearing assistance device
US9027698Feb 25, 2014May 12, 2015Jag Hearing, Llc.Hearing assistance device and method
US20030000521 *Apr 26, 2002Jan 2, 2003Sohn Manufacturing, Inc.Dressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
US20040153019 *Jan 22, 2004Aug 5, 2004Beaudry Wallace J.Method of positioning the epidermis
US20040159320 *Feb 14, 2004Aug 19, 2004Thomas SpinelliAdhesive strip for opening nasal passages
US20050027230 *Jun 4, 2004Feb 3, 2005Beaudry Wallace J.Nasal epidermal lifting mechanism
US20050131329 *Dec 29, 2004Jun 16, 2005Beaudry Wallace J.Dressing and an epidermal positioning mechanism and method for using same
US20070282235 *Aug 14, 2007Dec 6, 2007Beaudry Wallace JDressing and an epidermal positioning machanism and method for using same
US20100042139 *Oct 1, 2007Feb 18, 2010Norina HoneggerDevice for reshaping bones
US20110023330 *Aug 3, 2007Feb 3, 2011Shoo Sticks Pty LimitedSubstrate to releasably adhere to a region of apparel
WO1991018567A1 *May 17, 1991Dec 12, 1991Cornucopia Medical Products InNasal splint device
WO1997046275A1 *Apr 15, 1997Dec 11, 1997Creative Integration & DesignNasal dilator with areas of adhesive engagement of varying strength
WO1998015242A1 *Oct 9, 1997Apr 16, 1998Beurden Josephus W CNostril dilator
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/204.45, 606/215
International ClassificationA61F5/08, A61F5/01
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/08
European ClassificationA61F5/08